Science is one thread of culture – and entertainment, including graphic books, can reflect that. 'The Dialogues,' by Clifford V. Johnson (MIT Press 2017)

New ways scientists can help put science back into popular culture

You might not think much about science topics as part of your everyday life. But science – like art, music, religion – is part of our culture, and scientists can help it reclaim its rightful place.
The fear and distress caused by a false missile alarm last week on Jan. 13 in Hawaii is part of the 125 year legacy of American occupation. Here, cars drive past a highway sign: “Missile alert in error. There is no threat” on the H-1 Freeway in Honolulu. (Cory Lum/Civil Beat via AP)

Life, death and politics in Hawaii: 125 years of colonial rule

The fear and distress caused by a false missile alarm last week in Hawaii is part of the 125- year legacy of American occupation.
A liquid biopsy is far less invasive than a standard biopsy, where a needle is put into a solid tumour to confirm a cancer diagnosis. from shutterstock.com

A new blood test can detect eight different cancers in their early stages

There are currently few effective and non-invasive methods to screen for early stages of cancer. But scientists have now developed a new blood test that promises to detect eight different cancers.
Transport Minister Andrew Constance and the Coalition government are under pressure to fix long-standing problems with Sydney’s train system which have now come to a head. Daniel Munoz/AAP

This is how Sydney’s transport system has gone off the rails

The real challenge is finding appropriate ways to invest in public transport that will not only take pressure off the system but also support improved travel on all modes, including cars.
An illustration from a 1914 edition of Anna Karenina. Zahar Pichugin/Shutterstock.com

Guide to the Classics: Anna Karenina

Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina is often acclaimed as the best novel ever written. The enthralling narrative explores love and family through intertwining plot lines, with Anna and her desire at the centre.
At present, 15% of Australians experience food insecurity while 40% of food is discarded before it reaches the market. reuters

Hunger in the lucky country – charities step in where government fails

Despite Australia being considered the 'lucky country', 15% of us still experience food insecurity. Meanwhile, 40% of edible food is thrown away before it even reaches the market.
The painting Group of Natives of Tasmania, 1859, by Robert Dowling. Wikimedia

Explainer: the evidence for the Tasmanian genocide

That colonial wars were fought in Tasmania is irrefutable. More controversially, surviving evidence suggests the British enacted genocidal policies against the Tasmanian Aboriginal people.
Waking up to this every morning would surely give you more will to live. Unsplash/jonathan daniels

Four ways having a pet increases your lifespan

Pet owners will often swear their beloved pooch or moggie does wonders for their wellbeing, and now we have empirical proof.
Many of the challenges faced by social media companies come down to failures of design. shutterstock.com

Ethical design is the answer to some of social media’s problems

Tech companies are beginning to recognise that there is an ethical dimension to their work, and that they have some responsibility for the well-being of their users.
The surveyors start out with almost 100,000 graduate contacts, of whom less than 10% provide their supervisor’s details and of those supervisors, less than half participate in the survey. Shutterstock

Surveys are not the best way to measure the performance of Australian universities

An administrative link between a graduate's education and taxation records already exists, and it could be used to give us more accurate and detailed longitudinal analyses of graduate outcomes.

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