Print magazines are as popular as ever – but why? Shutterstock

Publishing

From pig hunting to quilting – why magazines still matter

Newspapers may be in crisis but magazines are thriving. The growth is in specialist titles - indeed the glossy offerings of Coles and Woolworths now have almost double the readership of the Australian Women's Weekly,
Gumtree Brutalism: the Eddie Koiki Mabo Library (1968), designed by Queensland architect James Birrell, on the James Cook University campus.

Architecture

Brutalism, a campus love story – or how I learned to love concrete

Academics are often in the vanguard of the fight to preserve heritage buildings but they are losing the battle on home turf as universities shed their 1960s and 1970s concrete skins.
Clementine Ford: one of the younger voices more visible now in mainstream media. Allen and Unwin/AAP

Culture

Young people, the media and Gangland 20 years on

It is 20 years since author Mark Davis wrote his influential book Gangland exploring the domination of baby boomers in public life. Is it time for a fresh exploration of 'generationalism' today?
(Eternal Sunshine of Spotless Mind) says to me…true love is still possible and you can put your faith in it.

Close Up

The great movie scenes: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

Bruce Isaacs analyses the deceptively complex closing scene of Charlie Kaufman’s Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004), starring Jim Carey and Kate Winslet.
Detail of a production still from Baden Pailthorpe ‘s MQ-9 Reaper III (Skyquest) 2015 Courtesy of the artist and Sullivan+Strumpf, Sydney

Friday essay

Friday essay: video games, military culture and new narratives of war

Video games such as Battlefield I encourage players to find purpose and meaning in war. But a new generation of artists and gamers is starting to question the messages they propagate.
Detail of Brook Andrew, Sexy and dangerous 1996. courtesy National Gallery of Victoria

Art

Here’s Looking at: Brook Andrew’s Sexy and dangerous

A 20th-century image of an anonymous 'Aboriginal Chief' becomes an investigation of power, colonialism and queer sexuality in the hands of Brook Andrew.

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