Romantic love is an increasingly popular topic of study within the academy, exploring issues ranging from how technology is changing relationships to masculinity as depicted in the Twilight books and films. Summit Entertainment, Temple Hill Entertainment, Maverick Films

The L-word

Love, Academically. Why scholarly hearts are beating for Love Studies

Love Studies, a relatively new academic field, looks at topics ranging from popular romance novels to issues of consent in the bedroom.
A still from Dennis O'Rourke’s 1988 documentary Cannibal Tours. O'Rourke was part of a surge in Australian documentary making during the 1980s and 90s. Institute of Papua New Guinea Studios

Screen culture

Where are the in-depth documentaries calling to account the institutions that are failing us?

At a time when formulaic factual 'content' reigns on our TV screens, a new essay on Australian documentary making is a rallying call for those who believe the genre can effect social change.
Lower Snug looking across North West Bay to Mt Wellington, Tasmania. Cassandra Pybus

Friday essay

Friday essay: lost and found in the Tasmanian bush

Alone and adrift in Melbourne, Cassandra Pybus returned on a whim to her childhood home of Tasmania. There, she rediscovered nature's power, encountering the island's difficult history as well as her own.
Behrouz Boochani won the $100,000 Victorian Prize for Literature, and the Prize for Non-Fiction, at the 2019 Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards. Amnesty International/AAP

Victorian Premier's Literary Awards

Behrouz Boochani’s literary prize cements his status as an Australian writer

Behrouz Boochani, an asylum seeker currently detained on Manus Island, has won Australia's richest literary prize. The win commands the question, 'what makes an Australian writer?'
An 1808 painting by Marie-Gabrielle Capet titled Atelier of Madame Vincent, showing Labille-Guiard at work (centre) as Capet fills her palette. Wikimedia Commons

Hidden women

Hidden women of history: Adélaïde Labille-Guiard, prodigiously talented painter

Adélaïde Labille-Guiard was a supremely skilled artist. But like so many talented women before and since, she suffered from snide allegations that she could not be capable of such brilliance.
SBS is continuing to tap into the slow TV trend, with its suite of ‘Slow Summer’ programming, including one exploring the Kimberley. SBS

Slow TV

Why slow TV deserves our (divided) attention

Slow TV is perfect viewing for our binge-watching, multi-tasking population.
Kathleen McArthur (left) and Judith Wright (right) wildflowering at Currimundi in 1961. Photo by Alex Jelinek. Courtesy Alexandra Moreno

Hidden women

Hidden women of history: Kathleen McArthur, the wildflower woman who took on Joh Bjelke-Petersen

Wildflower artist Kathleen McArthur led one of Australia's first major conservation battles, over Queensland's Cooloola region. Yet this canny activist is rarely mentioned in most accounts of the campaign.
To imagine is to form a mental image, to think, believe, dream, picture. Shutterstock

Creativity

How creativity can help us cultivate moral imagination

The poet Percy Bysshe Shelley believed that we can exercise our moral imagination 'in the same manner as exercise strengthens a limb'. Here, then, are some tips for fostering empathy through art.
Mary Jane Cain (centre) with granddaughters Miley Barker and Molly Chatfield and her great niece Josephine. The sun dancin' : people and place Coonabarabran (Aboriginal Studies Press, 1994)

Hidden women

Hidden women of history: Mary Jane Cain, land rights activist, matriarch and community builder

In the late 1880s, Gomeroi woman Mary Jane Cain began petitioning Britain for land rights. A matriarch and Queen to her people, she recovered 600 acres that became home to displaced Aboriginal families.
Angurugu mission school children in the 1940s on Groote Eylandt, NT. Missions helped both erode and preserve Indigenous languages. Groote Eylandt Linguistics

Year of Indigenous Languages

Why do so few Aussies speak an Australian language?

Australia was one of the most linguistically diverse places in the world but today, few people speak an Australian language.
November 2016 (left to right) Seraine Namundja, Donna Nadjamerrek, Julie Narndal and Cheryl Nadjalaburnburn preparing a new course in Bininj Kunwok, an Indigenous language in the Northern Territory. Provided by Cathy Bow

Our culture

The state of Australia’s Indigenous languages – and how we can help people speak them more often

In 60 years' time, only 13 of Australia's Indigenous languages will be left, unless something is done to encourage children to keep speaking their language.

More Analysis and Comment

Research and Expert Database

Job Board

Where experts find jobs

More Jobs

Events

More Events

How we are different

10 reasons

Most Read past week

  1. Hidden women of history: Maria Sibylla Merian, 17th-century entomologist and scientific adventurer
  2. From refugees to social media to pill testing, church signs are getting political
  3. Sailors’ journals shed new light on Bennelong, a man misunderstood by history
  4. Hidden women of history: Enheduanna, princess, priestess and the world’s first known author
  5. Best Picture at the Oscars? Why it has to be The Favourite out of a weak bunch

Pitch an idea

Got a news tip or article idea for The Conversation?

Tell us

Our Audience

The Conversation has a monthly audience of 10.7 million users, and reach of 38.2 million through Creative Commons republication.

Want to Write?

Write an article and join a growing community of more than 80,000 academics and researchers from 2,731 institutions.

Register now

Make a Donation

The Conversation relies on sector, government and reader support. If you would like to help us have even better conversations, then you may like to make a one-off or on-going donation.

Donate