Tribal members in a jirga, or circle – one traditional avenue for justice in Afghanistan. Lizette Potgieter/Shutterstock

Afghanistan: how to widen access to justice

In countries where people access different justice providers, a hybrid model could pull them together and ensure better oversight and human rights.
To perform a sequence of actions, our brains need to prepare and queue them in the correct order. AYAakovlev/Shutterstock

How the brain prepares for movement and actions

Knowing how the brain prepares for sequences of movements can help us better understand disorders such as stuttering and dyspraxia.

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