Artist Albert Robida imagined in 1882 how air travel might look in future. Everett Historical/Shutterstock

How will we travel the world in 2050?

More than a century since humans learned to fly, we need to revolutionise how we stay up there.
Environmentalists and activists with posters “peace in the forest and an end to indigenous genocide” in protest of the rights of indigenous people, in São Paulo, Brazil, January, 2019. PARALAXIS /Shutterstock

Defending the environment now more lethal than soldiering in some war zones – and indigenous peoples are suffering most

Indigenous peoples safeguard biodiversity better than any other group. But in 2018, 164 were killed defending the environment. It's time for us to heed their knowledge, and protect their future.

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