An immigrant child from Guatemala is seen at a facility in Texas on June 21, 2018. President Donald Trump’s policy to separate children from their parents at the U.S. border is an example of an incident that could result in toxic socialization. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

The damage we’re doing to our children and ourselves

The recent crop of so-called free speech warriors. From left to right: Gad Saad, Ben Shapiro, Lindsay Shepherd and Jordan Peterson. From left to right: (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz/AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli/Lindsay Shepherd, still from YouTube video/THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson)

The strange origins of the free speech warriors

U.S. President Donald Trump, seen here in a February 2018 photo, has a beef with trade deficits. Yet running trade deficits with Asian countries has long spurred American spending and consumption. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump’s odd aversion to trade deficits

In this 2005 photo, Rattan Singh Kalsi shows a photograph of his daughter, Indira, at a meeting with families of the victims of the 1985 Air India bombing. (CP PHOTO/Aaron Harris)

Air India anniversary

Canada’s indifference to the Air India bombing

When preparing for a course, a McMaster University professor found an alarming lack of knowledge among Canadians about the Air India bombing of 1985. Why the startling indifference from Canadians?
Child survivors of Auschwitz are seen in this 1945 photograph. (Creative Commons)

The history of children in concentration camps

The more notorious concentration camps of the 20th century must serve as a stark reminder of the depravity of tearing children away from their parents and putting them in camps.
Almost 1,500 immigrant boys, aged 10 to 17, were separated from their parents and brought to stay at Casa Padre in Brownsville, Texas. Department of Health and Human Services

America looks like a Dickens novel

There are strong parallels between the Trump administration’s policy on immigrant families and the 19th century's 'New' Poor Laws of England, whose cruelty was illuminated by writer Charles Dickens.
A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in McAllen, Texas. AP Photo/Eric Gay

Sudden separation can alter brain development

The traumatic separations of children and parents initiated at the border can cause permanent changes in the structure of the infants' and children's brains and the activity of their genes.
There are now many gender categorizations, from the traditional ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ to ‘gender fluid’ and ‘undifferentiatied.’ Health researchers can work with these to gain a more accurate understanding of disease susceptibilities. (Shutterstock)

Sex and gender both shape your health, in different ways

Bigender, gender fluid, cisgender? Emerging gender categorizations are important -- for your health.
Protesters demonstrate against the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in May 2018 in Vancouver. Building infrastructure is a tricky business for the private and public sector alike. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

The risky business of government-run pipelines

When the Canadian government announced its pending ownership in the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, it entered the complex business of pipeline infrastructure.
Ontario Premier-designate Doug Ford pledged to repeal the provincial sex-ed curriculum. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

Sex-ed isn’t going to turn you gay

With Doug Ford Nation taking over Ontario, our school curriculum, especially sexual education, is at risk of being censored and being thrown back to a time when diverse sexualities was a mystery.
Has Pride been coopted? This year’s Pride parade spectators have been asked to wear black in honour of the victims of serial killers. A drag queen at the Toronto 2016 gay pride parade. Shutterstock

Pride Month

Is queer culture losing its radical roots?

Spectators at Toronto's Pride parade this year are being asked to wear black to honour victims of serial killers. While it's right to mourn, it's not the biggest issue facing gay communities today.
A recent analysis of profile pictures on Grindr show that most people using the site emphasize their physical fitness and bodies indicating that they using it as the Uber of casual sex. (Shutterstock)

Pride Month

Grindr profile pics are all about the hookup

Grindr, the largest queer dating app worldwide, is all about the short term hookup; the currency used to attract your date is physical fitness versus wealth symbols, used by straight men on Tinder.
Executive pay is an issue that often causes public uproar. But it’s not as greed-driven as we might think. Razvan Chisu/Unsplash

Uproar over executive pay isn’t entirely warranted

High CEO compensation angers the public, particularly when it doesn't seemed tied to performance. But as a whole, trends in executive compensation are consistent with fundamental economic forces.
Math Catcher volunteer, Janelle Dobson-Kocsis from the Kwanlin Dun Band, works with a student to build an object called “tensegrity.” This is one of Math Cather’s hands-on activities developed by volunteer and former PhD student, Alejandro Erickson. Math Catcher Program

National Indigenous Peoples Day

Math talent abounds in Indigenous communities

The Math Catcher Program aims to encourage youth - with an emphasis on Indigenous students - to consider mathematics as a field of study but also to have them appreciate mathematics in everyday life.
Management academics often face students in their classrooms with more practical experience in the business world than they have. But management is an important inter-disciplinary field that has a lot to offer business executives. (Shutterstock)

Why management academics matter

Those who study, research and teach management are often viewed skeptically, even by their students, who might have more experience than they do in the business world. Here's why that's wrong.
Research shows that students who engage in inquiry-based learning perform better on standardised tests than students in more traditional learning environments. (Shutterstock)

Why your child will benefit from inquiry-based learning

Research shows that 'discovery learning' does have limited educational value; many other forms of inquiry-based learning, however, have excellent results.
Plans for a new bridge between Detroit and Windsor, Ont., named after hockey great Gordie Howe, will increase the flow of goods between Canada and the U.S. But Canada’s current trade war with the United States means the country should diversify its economy by relying less on its southern neighbour. HE CANADIAN PRESS/Dave Chidley

Beyond NAFTA: Canada must find new markets

Is Canada ready for a scenario where the North American Free Trade Agreement is scrapped? The tense negotiations with the United States are a chance for Canada to diversify its trade partnerships.
Refugee Journeys is a board game designed to help front-line workers and educators confront their bias towards refugees. Michelle Lam

A board game challenges ideas about refugees

Many Canadians have volunteered to help newcomers adjust to society. This board game was developed to help these volunteers understand what it feels like to enter a new country and build a new life.
Cattle that are grass-fed, antibiotic- and growth hormone-free gather at a farm in Oregon in 2015. There’s a debate over whether antibiotic use in livestock makes germs more resistant to the drugs, and results in infections being passed on to humans who consume the meat. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

Reducing antibiotics in farm animals isn’t easy

The use of antibiotics in raising livestock is complex. We could be moving towards a less-than-ideal result due to poor understanding, over-simplistic messaging and a rush for competitive advantage.
Millennials dream of home ownership. In expensive cities like Toronto and Vancouver, they’re saving up to buy homes by living with their parents or taking on tenants once they save up enough to buy. (Shutterstock)

Canada’s millennials still make home ownership happen

Canada's millennials want to own homes in the country's most expensive cities, Toronto and Vancouver. Here's how they're managing to do so, but is it sustainable?

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