Women were only just granted permission to drive in Saudi Arabia, a kingdom with an atrocious human rights record. Canada can and should leverage its ongoing spat with the country to advocate for human rights across the Middle East. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

Canada-Saudi quarrel could help Middle East

United States’ Simone Manuel who won the Olympic gold medal for the U.S. in the 100-meter freestyle at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, said she hopes for a day when there are more Black swimmers. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Swimming while Black

A statue of John A. Macdonald in Montreal has been repeatedly vandalized with red paint to symbolize blood. As the debate continues about removing statues, what specific actions are needed to promote reconciliation? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Reconciliation requires more than symbolic gestures

Removing statues of historical figures may be important symbolic statements when it comes to reconciliation, but action on important Indigenous issues like land claims and education are needed more.
Montreal Alouettes quarterback Johnny Manziel is tackled by the Ottawa Redblacks in Ottawa on Aug. 11, 2018. Manziel was subsequently placed under the CFL concussion protocol. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

How concussions can stress the heart

Recent research shows that the heart is affected when the head takes a blow, in sports-related concussion.
Aretha Franklin performs at New York’s Radio City Music Hall in 1989. AP Photo/Mario Suriani

How Aretha Franklin found her voice

When record executives tried to mold Franklin's sound to their liking, her career sputtered. Then legendary producer Jerry Wexler came along. His approach? Stay out of her way.
Scientific pursuits need to be coupled with a humanist tradition — to highlight not just how psychedelics work, but why that matters. (Shutterstock)

Psychedelic drugs could treat mental illness

Once associated with mind-control experiments and counter-cultural defiance, psychedelics now show great promise for mental health treatments and may prompt a re-evaluation of the scientific method.
New research suggests that midlife Canadians struggle with a variety of sexual problems, with low desire reported as most common for both men and women. (Shutterstock)

Midlife sex problems? You’re not alone

Low libido, problems ejaculating, vaginal pain -- these problems are common for midlife Canadians, and some of them are way more likely if you're married.
Actors Laura Harrier and John David Washington humorously and believably drive home the film’s strong racial irony. Universal Pictures

‘BlacKkKlansman’ – a deadly serious comedy

BlacKkKlansman is more than a good story: it expertly weaves together comedy with serious drama to bring the story of past racism to illuminate our present day issues.
Crazy Rich Asians depicts cosmopolitan rich Asians with complex humanities. Warner Bros.

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ – a movie and a movement

Crazy Rich Asians is an entertaining film, but also has been a long time coming. The struggle for Asian representation in Hollywood and Broadway started more than 55 years ago.
The decision by the city of Victoria to take down a statue of John A. Macdonald has renewed debate about how historical figures should be remembered. This photo from 2015, taken at Wilfrid Laurier University, shows people protesting Macdonald’s treatment of Métis and First Nations during his time as Canada’s first prime minister. Denia Anderson

John A. Macdonald should not be celebrated

Should statues of historical figures be removed or replaced? That debate has been rekindled in Canada after Victoria took down a statue of John A. Macdonald, the country's first prime minister.
Demonstrators rally in support of women’s rights at the Women’s March on Jan. 20, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Shutterstock)

Sexist barriers block women’s sterilization

Women face extraordinary difficulty in seeking the birth control method of sterilization due to sexist reproductive norms.
U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence speaks about the creation of a United States Space Force on Aug. 9, 2018 at the Pentagon. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

How Canadian tech could protect Space Force troops

Could Canadian technology play a part in the newly announced U.S. Space Force? A team at McMaster University has developed an instrument that could keep Space Force troops safe from radiation.
The leaders of the 18 Asia-Pacific economies pose for a family photo in Vancouver in 1997. Indonesia’s Suharto is sixth from the left. Protests against human rights violations were kept hidden from Suharto during the summit. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

When Canada did & didn’t stand up for human rights

Canada's clashes with Indonesia in the 1990s over human rights abuses contain lessons for the current Canadian-Saudi Arabian diplomatic dispute.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford arrives for the buck-a-beer plan announcement at Barley Days brewery in Picton, Ont., on Aug. 7, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

Why Doug Ford should think twice about changing booze and weed laws

Ontario Premier Doug Ford is loosening the province's liquor laws. Before dismantling a system, it's a good idea to know why it was established in the first place.
Cambodia’s Prime Minister Hun Sen weaves a traditional cotton scarf In Phnom Penh in June. He won the recent Cambodia election in a landslide after literally rigging the vote by banning the main opposition party, among other tricks. (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)

How Hun Sen rigged Cambodia’s election

The re-election of Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen contributes to the growing global democratic crisis. Here's why.
Kids teething? Back in 1885, Mrs. Winslow’s Soothing Syrup, containing morphine, was close at hand and earned the nickname the “baby killer.” Concerns about the dangers of readily available medications played a big role in how Canada’s drug laws evolved. The U.S. National Library of Medicine

The influence of opium panic on drug policy

Canadian drug policy began to take shape well before anti-immigration attacks on Chinese establishments in 1908. Drugs like opium and coke were causing grave public health concerns.
Ensaf Haidar stands next to a poster of her husband, jailed blogger Raif Badawi, in Montreal in June 2015. The arrest of Badawi’s sister, Samar, is at the centre of a bitter spat between Canada and Saudi Arabia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

The Saudi-Canada spat: Both countries are wrong

The ongoing diplomatic spat between Canada and Saudi Arabia will hurt Canada if the kingdom intensifies its aggressive retaliation measures.
In this 2015 photo, Ensaf Haidar, wife of the jailed Saudi Arabian blogger Raif Badawi, shows a portrait of her husband in France. The arrest of Badawi’s sister is at the heart of a diplomatic spat between Canada and Saudi Arabia that will significantly affect trade between the two countries. (AP Photo/Christian Lutz)

The trade implications of the Canada-Saudi spat

The diplomatic spat between Canada and Saudi Arabia could have serious economic ramifications as well. When diplomatic ties are cut, research shows trade suffers significantly.
Small business owners provide a service by offering goods not found elsewhere and employing local community members. Here, a sari shop window in Toronto’s ‘India Bazaar.’ Ian Muttoo/https://www.flickr.com/photos/imuttoo/

Mom & Pop Shops are really social ventures

We may celebrate the contributions of newcomers of the past; however, we make the integration process difficult. Some immigrants turn to business to fill the gaps for themselves and their community.
There’s a hue and cry about Doug Ford’s scrapping of Ontario’s basic income project. But the project was a failing experiment with a dearth of high-quality data. Flickr

The flaws of Ontario’s basic income project

Ontario's basic income project was deeply flawed and cursed by a lack of quality data. It needs a major overhaul.

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