Students walk on campus at the University of Guelph in Guelph, Ont., in March 2017. An Ontario court recently ruled in favour of student associations and struck down an Ontario government directive that threatened their survival. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Hannah Yoon

Ontario student groups not in the clear yet

Health justice funds could be used to support Black and Indigenous health initiatives and provide mental and physical health services to deal with the impact of transgenerational trauma. (Shutterstock)

Truth and Reconciliation in Canada

Use reparations to address health inequities

The new sign commemorating the anniversary of the 1989 École Polytechnique shooting now recognizes that it was an attack against women and feminists. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Montréal Massacre: Finally recognized as an anti-feminist attack

Thirty years after the Montreal Massacre that killed 14 women, new threats such as the incel movement pose dangers to the feminist movement.
Canadian statistics reveal that a woman is killed every five days by an intimate partner or a family member. This picture represents women killed from Jan. 1 to Nov 30, 2019. Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice and Accountability

Remembering violence against women and girls on Dec. 6

While we remember the women murdered 30 years ago, we shouldn't ignore those short, terse paragraphs in the news that describe the everyday, routine violence inflicted upon women.
Engineering programs can learn about recruitment, inclusion and retention from different fields. (Shutterstock)

Women in engineering: Barriers remain 30 years after attack

On Dec. 6, 1989, 14 women were murdered at École Polytechnique. Women in a mechanical engineering class were targeted, and 30 years later the ratio of women to men in engineering hasn't improved much.
A 19-year-old first-year student from Promoting Opportunities for Women in Engineering at McGill addresses Grade 11 students in 2017 in Montréal. Progress has been made to encourage more women to study STEM since the Montréal Massacre in 1989. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Experiences of a woman engineer since Montreal Massacre

Engineering is in a better place than in 1989. More women are studying the field, and academic administrators and managers want to hire female engineers. But more work is still needed.
Canada’s mission in Afghanistan under former prime minister Stephen Harper is an example of how a minority situation for a government can influence foreign policy. Harper is seen here in Kandahar in May 2011, shortly after winning a majority government. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

How minority governments can influence foreign policy

Minority parliaments create a political environment that discourages cabinet from bold acts. That means Justin Trudeau's foreign policy will like be more risk-averse that it was before.
A picture taken in the late 1970s shows a group of refugees (162 persons) who arrived on a small boat which sank a few meters from the shore in Malaysia. UNHCR/K. Gaugler

The world’s first private refugee sponsorship program

Forty years ago, the Canadian government applied its new program for private sponsorship of refugees allowing Canada to welcome the largest number of Southeast Asian refugees in the world.
A Palestinian protester throws a Molotov cocktail during clashes with Israeli troops during demonstrations against the Israeli offensive on Gaza in November 2019. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)

What constitutes fair and unfair criticism of Israel?

There's little hope as we head into 2020 that Israel will negotiate in good faith with Palestinian leaders. Yet Israel will never be safe from attack until it does so.
Historically, the body and movement have been widely disregarded within psychotherapy. But times are changing, as a growing movement of somatic and dance therapies are gaining scientific credibility. (Shutterstock)

The healing power of dance

Dance therapy is effective in treating depression, improving memory and neuroplasticity in older adults and improving executive function in those with Parkinson's disease.
There is little evidence that vaping is an effective way to quit smoking or reduce health risks. (Shutterstock)

B.C.’s vaping crackdown: A roadmap for the world?

As new vaping-related lung diseases continue to be identified, jurisdictions around the world might want to take a look at new vaping regulations in British Columbia, Canada.
A sign and stuffed animal lay at the entrance to Sir Winston Churchill Secondary School ahead of a vigil for murdered 14-year-old Devan Bracci-Selvey, at his high school in Hamilton, Ont., in October 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Cole Burston

The need to figure out what fuels bullying

A truly new approach to combating bullying would investigate the factors that make bullying attractive, rewarding and legitimized in the first place, both in schools and beyond.
A woman takes a selfie with three others while attending the Vaisakhi Parade in Surrey, B.C., on April 22, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Punjabi ideas of honour may lead to sex selection

Studies suggest a significant proportion of Indian-origin families in Canada are practising female feticide. It is crucial to understand how gender inequality may lead to sex selection.
Who is responsible for protecting consumer data? Data breaches are now a regular occurrence, and governments are stepping in. (Shutterstock)

Governments must step in to stem data breaches

Failure of corporations to protect data means that government regulation is required to ensure corporation compliance.
Following a negotiation impasse, Ontario public secondary teachers walked off the job on a one-day strike. Here, striking teachers are seen outside the Toronto District School Board office on Yonge Street in Toronto, Dec. 4, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston

Ontario’s e-learning must address special needs

Ontario high school labour negotiations broke down over student quality of learning — including mandatory e-learning. Ontario has yet to explain how this will work for students with special needs.
This image captures the hope felt by many Canadians four years ago as Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, centre, posing for selfies with airport workers, greeted refugees from Syria arriving on a government-sponsored airplane in Toronto, on Dec. 10, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Syrian refugees in Canada four years later

The overall outcomes of Syrian refugees’ resettlement experiences are positive, but challenges remain.
Mosquitoes play an important role as pollinators. (Shutterstock)

The bizarre and hidden lives of mosquitoes

Mosquitoes have intricate and essential relationships with plants. Understanding their important work as pollinators would help to understand their role in different ecosystems.
Tesla CEO Elon Musk introduces the Cybertruck – with shattered windows – at Tesla’s design studio in November 2019 in Hawthorne, Calif. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

Tesla’s Cybertruck is revolutionary

There's no question Tesla's Cybertruck will face stiff competition in the electric pickup truck market. Here's why it has the edge.
‘Frozen II’ sees Elsa move towards being herself without fear of harming others. Here, Elsa, voiced by Idina Menzel, sprinkling snowflakes on Bruni, a salamander. (Disney via AP)

‘Frozen II’ helps children weather risk and accept change

Frozen II teaches children that venturing into the enchanted forest — stepping outside of comfort zones while looking to trusted guides or companions — can be a place of positive transformation.
The practise of smearing microbes from mom’s vagina to the mouth, nose or skin of a baby born from Caesarean section is called ‘vaginal seeding.’ It aims to boost the child’s immune system. (Shutterstock)

Can ‘vaginal seeding’ help your C-section baby?

A recent study of the newborn microbiome revealed that babies delivered via C-section were missing friendly bacteria and had picked up harmful microbes usually found in hospital environments.

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