The South Korean government has decided to dim its office lights at 7 p.m. and shorten its work week hoping to encourage young people to date again. A favourite lover’s activity is to put a lock on Namsan mountain’s Seoul Tower to declare love. Shutterstock

Valentine's Day

Why young South Koreans stay single

Around the world, government officials fail often at implementing policy and public sector projects. Here’s why. (Shutterstock)

Why governments fail at implementing projects

Research around the world shows a consistent pattern of failures in public sector policy and project implementation. Yet we continue to embark upon implementation built on bias and faulty logic.
Three sisters (winter squash, maize and climbing beans) summer garden at the University of Guelph. (Hannah Tait Neufeld)

Indigenous researchers plant seeds of hope

Indigenous food and medicine gardens, and traditional manikin (wild rice) harvesting offer hope -- for the future health of humanity and the earth that sustains us.
Dogs are more sensitive than humans to the psychotropic (mind-altering) effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in cannabis products. (Unsplash/Ana Martin)

How to keep your pets safe from pot poisoning

Pets are vulnerable to cannabis toxicity - by ingesting cannabis products and also by inhaling second hand smoke. In some cases this can be lethal.
The West Moberly First Nation would like to see biodiversity-rich riparian areas in the Peace River Valley, in northeastern British Columbia protected. They will be destroyed by the Site C hydro dam, currently under construction. Garth Lenz

Protecting not-so-wild places helps biodiversity

Countries can protect biodiversity and recognize Indigenous peoples as conservation partners.
In 2016, parents protested the previous Ontario Liberal government’s decision to cut therapy for autistic children aged five and older. Moves by Ontario’s Conservative government have also raised concerns. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Ontario Autism Program changes will hurt kids

An autism policy researcher and the mother of an affected child weighs in on the recent changes announced to the Ontario Autism Program.
Wiarton Willie, pictured with Premier Doug Ford on Groundhog Day, cannot yet predict what Ontario may do to full-day kindergarten. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Doug Ball

Ontario needs full-day kindergarten

Nine years in from its start date, full-day kindergarten is doing its job laying foundational learning for the future of individual children and the province at large.
Biafran refugees flee federal Nigerian troops on a road near Ogbaku, Nigeria in this 1968 photo. Between one and three million people are estimated to have died. (AP Photo/Kurt Strumpf)

Nigerian writers on the Igbos genocide

Nigerian poets and novelists have compared the Igbo massacres in the 60s to the Holocaust as a way to drive international attention to the atrocities.
Toronto school board data reveals that Black, racialized and lower-income students face significant gaps in student outcomes. Nik Shuliahin /Unsplash

Red alert: Racialized opportunity gaps

In examining and addressing opportunity gaps for racialized students in schools, school boards must learn to account for present-day and historical inequities.
In this October 2015 photo, German federal police officers guide a group of migrants on their way after crossing the border between Austria and Germany. Once granted citizenship, newcomers face near-impossible hurdles to reunite their families. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Bad immigration policy hurts citizens too

It's important to unearth how discriminatory immigration policy, largely invisible to the general public, undermines citizens’ rights and position.
In 2016, drug company salespeople gave out almost 10 million pills to doctors. (Unsplash)

Big Pharma’s free samples = costlier drugs

It takes about three years for safety problems to be identified in new drugs, newer drugs are almost always more expensive, and yet Canadian doctors still hand out hundreds of thousands of samples.
Unavoidable crises will upend the world we live in. Shutterstock

Red pill or blue: Our sustainable future

Unavoidable crises will upend the world we live in but a shift from addictive accumulation to sustainable living may improve our quality of life.
Blackouts are common in Haiti. In this February 2006 photo, Haitian electoral workers count ballots by candlelight during a routine blackout in Port-au-Prince. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

Haiti blackouts symbolize loss of political power

For many Haitians, blackouts do not just signal a political crisis; they also symbolize feelings of their loss of political power.
The benefits of beans, lentils and other pulses go beyond the belly. (Shutterstock)

Benefits of pulses: Good for you and the planet

Today’s production of more, better food from the same amount land means that tomorrow’s population may not go hungry.
Tax breaks or exemptions for those working in pharmacy, health insurance and pharmaceutical industries could help bolster support for a national pharmacare plan. (Shutterstock)

Tax breaks could soften the blow of pharmacare

Two community pharmacists suggest a way for improving the palatability of evidence-based universal pharmacare -- for those working in health insurance, pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry.
Before going to the polls later this year, the current NDP government in Alberta should consider changes to a controversial law on sex education THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Sex ed in Alberta is not just an LGBTQ issue

Alberta's Bill 44 requiring schools to alert parents when they're teaching sex ed should be amended in order to protect both youth health and education towards democracy.

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