A sign of how historical #MeToo felt in 2017 is this appearance by #MeToo founder Tarana Burke with TV personality Allison Hagendorf on stage at the New Year’s Eve celebration in Times Square on Dec. 31, 2017, in New York. (Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP)

#MeToo

Must sex assault always be denounced in public?

An Indian paramilitary soldier checks the bag of a Kashmiri man during curfew in Srinagar, Indian-controlled Kashmir. The lives of millions in India’s only Muslim-majority region have been upended recently. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

Call the crime in Kashmir what it is: Genocide

Paramilitary soldiers walk past Rapid Action Force (RAF) soldiers standing guard during security lockdown in Jammu, India, Aug. 9, 2019. The restrictions on public movement throughout Kashmir have forced people to stay indoors. All communications and the internet have been cut off. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)

Modi ushers in a new, intolerant India

Memories and the experiences gained through play are foundational to one’s lifelong learning. (Shutterstock)

A day at the beach: Deep learning for a child

Through a play day filled with choices at the beach with supportive adults, unexpected challenges and social experiences all help children to build far more than sand castles.
Boredom has historically been an emotion both viewed as an enemy and embraced for its possibilities. (Shutterstock)

The fascinating history of boredom

Scholars link the emergence of the term boredom to European industrial modernity, and the standardization of time, repetitive labour and development of leisure time associated with it.
It took Thomas Edison countless failures before he succeeded in developing a marketable lightbulb. Shutterstock

Technology start-ups that fail fast succeed faster

Canadian technology start-ups that incorporate an approach that learns from failure tend to perform and innovate with greater success than start-ups that seek to assign blame.
Hundreds of clinical trials have been conducted over the past 10 years to find a cure for Alzheimer’s disease. They all failed. Shutterstock

Rethinking the fight against Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. Despite all efforts, no treatments have been found yet. To increase the odds, we need to rethink our approach and try to better understand it.
Segments of PVC pipe washed up on shore in Denman Sound, B.C. Paul Nicklen/Sea Legacy

Demand for luxury shellfish pollutes oceans

Growing demand for large salt-water clams is leaving parts of the B.C. coast littered with plastic debris.
Betty Osceola, a Miccosukee educator and water activist who runs her own airboat business, is one narrative guide into the Everglades in SwampScapes. (Grant Bemis)

A virtual reality field trip through the Everglades

A filmmaker, her students and community partners create a multi-platform documentary and study guide to teach swamp literacy and care through a trip into the Everglades.
In this May 2013 photo, residents walk past a cordon of soldiers standing guard at a checkpoint in San Rafael Las Flores, Guatemala, near a mine owned by Tahoe Resources Inc. (AP Photo/Luis Soto)

Corporations & human rights abuses abroad

Despite a recent Tahoe Resources settlement and apology to Guatemalan protesters, Canadian companies can still get away with crimes committed abroad — even in the face of insurmountable evidence.
Reports suggest there are more than 100 tobacco-sponsored schools in China, a country with more than 300 million smokers. (Shutterstock)

China’s tobacco industry is building schools

The Chinese National Tobacco Corporation is expanding its international markets through subsidiaries. Is the world ready for tobacco companies sponsoring or supporting schools?
Canada’s Christian right is largely isolated, and has little of the clout of evangelicals south of the border. (Shutterstock)

Canada’s marginal ‘Christian right’

While they're not going away, evangelicals and social conservatives in Canada are distinctly different from the American Christian right.
Canadian leaders face high-stakes decisions about 5G technology. In this June 26, 2019, photo, visitors tour the Huawei pavilion at the Mobile World Congress in Shanghai, China. (Chinatopix via AP)

Huawei decision will antagonize U.S. or China

The place of Huawei in Canada's 5G network, and the associated national security implications, will be a key issue for the next federal government.
When drug companies and drug regulators, such as Health Canada, sit down together at “pre-submission meetings” this may have a negative impact on public health. (Shutterstock)

Health Canada & Big Pharma: Too close

Drug companies have a job to do and so does Health Canada. When the relationship becomes murky, the public are at risk.
Whose responsibility is it to manage technology-related distractions in class? (Shutterstock)

Professors long for eye contact with students

Some students who participated in a study of technology in the classroom believed instructors are at fault if students turn to technology when they are bored.
Demand for midwifery services across Canada is now much greater than midwives can currently provide. (Shutterstock)

25 years of midwifery in Canada: What’s next?

The benefits of midwifery for women and babies globally are clear. In Canada, innovations in midwifery centres and services are tempered by low pay and high rates of burnout.
Members of the National Council of Canadian Muslims Mustafa Farooq, left, and Bochra Manaï, right, speak during a news conference in Montréal, June 17, 2019, where plans were outlined to lawfully challenge Québec’s Bill 21. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Will Québec’s Bill 21 embolden bullying?

Québec schools must consider Bill 21's potential impact on students. Bullying researchers have found links between publicly permitted behaviour and personal expression.
Law enforcement officers walking to the scene of a shooting at a shopping mall in El Paso, Texas, on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. AP/Rudy Gutierrez

Changes in language of far-right explain violence

Major changes in the language of white supremacists have happened in the last decade that provide a window into how the groups mobilize support, shape political perceptions and advance their cause.
It’s important to help children understand that death is part of life. Here, the father, Mufasa, voiced by James Earl Jones, and his son, Simba, voiced by JD McCrary, in a scene from ‘The Lion King.’ (Disney via AP)

What ‘The Lion King’ teaches us about children’s grief

'The Lion King' illustrates how a child moves through five stages of grief with the support of loving friends, family and community.

C'est ici : La Conversation Canada

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