The UK’s Online Harms White Paper provides a starting point to consider what internet regulation can look like. Shutterstock

Lessons from the U.K.’s Online Harms white paper

Britain's Online Harms white paper was developed through public consultations and open, democratic processes. It suggests developing regulations that would be implemented by an arms-length entity.
Canadian medical students graduate with up to $200,000 in debt, and burnout rates are high. (Shutterstock)

Five strategies to improve medical training

A 'learn local' strategy, along with increased residency positions and the return of a rotating internship could go a long way towards improving Canada's system of medical training.
Leggings on women challenge all kinds of conventions about how they take up space with their strong and active bodies. Shutterstock

Don’t ban leggings – they let women move like superheroes

A feminist philosopher and fitness writer challenges a mother who recently asked Notre Dame University to ban leggings on campus. Leggings allow women to move like superheroes, she says.
April 15, 2019, 7:34 p.m.: Notre-Dame de Paris in flames. Leighton Kille

The future of Notre-Dame de Paris

The fire that devastated the Notre-Dame de Paris cathedral on April 15 is a historic event that reminds us of the symbolic power of national monuments.
In a political dispute with Ottawa, Doug Ford’s Ontario government has stopped funding legal aid for refugee claimants. This 2017 photo shows a young asylum seeker being held by an RCMP officer and her father after crossing the border into Canada from the United States. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Ontario’s cuts to legal aid harm refugees

The recent decision by the Ontario government to drastically cut funds for legal aid will cause hardship for many low-income residents of Ontario and for refugees claimants.
Filmmaker Agnes Varda holds the Honorary Palme d'Or award at the 68th international film festival, Cannes, France. Varda, a central figure of the French New Wave who later won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, has died. She was 90. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

Agnès Varda, a pioneering artist who saw the extraordinary in the ordinary

Beloved film director Agnès Varda died at age 90, on March 29th. She was a pioneer of French New Wave cinema and admired for her ability to understand time and see beauty outside of mechanical norms.
Smartphones make great citizen research tools. We take them everywhere and they have the functions (GPS, accelerometers, camera, audio, video) to sense, share and mobilize data between consenting citizens. (Shutterstock)

How smartphones can encourage active living

We blame electronic devices for our increasingly sedentary behaviours. So why not harness them to study our movement patterns and tackle urgent health crises?
Policy-makers must remember that the social consequences of a test are just as important as the test’s content. (Shutterstock)

The impact of new global testing standards

The stakes could be highest for students around the world as education systems decide how to respond to the changing shape of global standardized testing.
Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda is seen in the courtroom of the International Criminal Court in 2018. (Bas Czerwinski/AP)

International court’s refusal to investigate U.S. means colonialism still exists in law

International law has deep connections to structures of power and inequality. Thankfully, committed jurists like Fatou Bensouda are fighting oppression through their unapologetic acts of resistance.
A U.S.-backed Syrian soldier reacts as an airstrike hits territory held by Islamic State militants outside Baghouz, Syria, in February 2019. The Islamic State group has been reduced from its self-proclaimed caliphate that once spread across much of Syria and Iraq at its height in 2014 to a speck of land on the countries’ shared border. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

The rout of ISIS could help defeat its ideology

Only by prosecuting extremists will the world be able to marginalize those who carry out violent acts and those who give credence to their ideas.
A man walks in a back alley in Vancouver’s downtown eastside, February 2019. More people fatally overdosed in British Columbia last year compared with 2017 despite efforts to combat the province’s public health emergency. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

The opioid crisis is not about pain

A policy response focused on reducing prescription opioids will not resolve North America's opioid crisis. And it is hurting many adults who live with otherwise unbearable chronic pain.
Faith Goldy is shown outside Wilfrid Laurier University in March 2018. Facebook may have banned Goldy and other ‘alt-right’ figures, but their influence is greater than social media. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Hannah Yoon

Starving online trolls won’t stop far-right ideas

It's all well and good for Facebook to shut down people like Faith Goldy, but it's critical we recognize that the far right’s culture war is diffusing more broadly within Canadian politics.
As machine learning progresses, its applications include faster, more accurate medical diagnoses. Shutterstock

AI offers more accurate health-care diagnoses

A research lab at the University of Saskatchewan is pursuing the applications of artificial intelligence and machine learning to healthcare diagnoses.
Over the last hundred years, there have been at least three major waves of ‘progressive’ education in Ontario. Here, Premier Doug Ford with Finance Minister Vic Fedeli after presenting the 2019 budget at the legislature on April 11, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Latest ‘progressive’ school reforms

The Progressive Conservative government's call to modernize education invokes long-standing rhetoric about progressive education in paradoxical ways.
Fatima, a nine-year-old Syrian refugee to Sweden, is featured in photojournalist Magnus Wennman’s documentary film Fatima’s Drawings. Magnus Wennman

Children educate teachers with war stories

As 'tiny historians of their age,' children with testimonies of war provide teachers with both historical insight and critical instruction.
A grizzly bear eats ripe buffaloberry fruit in the Bow Valley of Alberta. Shifts in the timing of buffaloberry development in the Rocky Mountains will change the behaviour of grizzly bears, and could threaten reproductive rates in this vulnerable population. Alex P. Taylor

Alberta grizzly bears will feel climate change

As warming temperatures shift the availability of key food sources, Alberta's grizzly bears will be forced to adjust.
Voice-enabled searches are becoming increasingly popular when it comes to web browsing, and that’s a problem for the food industry. (Shutterstock)

Why food retailers are slow to adopt technology

According to a recent report, 30 per cent of web-browsing sessions will soon be done without a screen. Voice-enabled searches are becoming the norm, and that's a problem for the food industry.
As automated technologies are increasingly incorporated into car design, consumers need to educate themselves on these features for safety reasons. Shutterstock

A user’s guide to self-driving cars

More manufactured cars are integrating assisted-driving technologies such as parking support and networked dashboards. But what should a consumer look for?

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