Jim Carr, Canada’s minister of Natural Resources, delivers a statement on TransCanada’s decision to cancel the Energy East Pipeline project on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

Regulations alone didn’t sink the Energy East pipeline

With TransCanada's decision to cancel the Energy East pipeline project Canada's energy policies are under attack.
Wildfire creates an orange glow in a view from a hilltop Oct. 13, 2017, in Geyserville, California. AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Wildfire smoke & health: 5 questions answered

Wildfires in California have triggered a public health emergency. One threat is smoke inhalation: Some air readings have registered pollution levels comparable to bad air days in Beijing or Mumbai.
Sulawesi, part of the biogeographical region of Wallacea, is home to tarsiers – tiny, goggle-eyed creatures look more like mammalian tree frogs than monkeys. Ondrej Prosicky/www.shutterstock.com

Wallacea: a living laboratory of evolution

The central islands of Indonesia, also known as Wallacea, is a place of wonder, a living laboratory for the study of evolution.
An aerial view of the Datong Panda Power Plant, Shanxi Province of China, 25 July 2017. The plant aims for a total capacity of 100MW upon completion. EPA/HOW HWEE YOUNG

China’s green planning starts with infrastructure

China has become a commanding authority in infrastructure and has the opportunity to shape global development in ways that may define the rest of the 21st century.
Fire crews douse derailed tanker cars carrying crude oil in downtown Lac-Mégantic, Que., in this July 6, 2013, file photo. A trial is now underway for three former railway employees charged in connection with the fatal train derailment. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson)

Technology to prevent rail disasters is in our hands

As the Lac Mégantic rail disaster trial begins, here’s how technology can help prevent a repeat of the tragedy that killed 47 people.
Leadbeater’s possum sightings are up – but that doesn’t mean the critically endangered species is recovering. David Lindenmeyer

More endangered species sightings is not recovery

Increased sightings of endangered species doesn't mean it's recovering – but that's the argument being made by the native forest logging industry.
Grid operators set the prices for energy markets and are structured to take the lowest prices – a disadvantage for coal and nuclear power.

EPA carbon rules won’t change overnight

Two moves by the Trump administration signal a dramatic shift in energy policy to favor coal and nuclear, but markets forces and legal challenges mean changes could take years.
A U.S. agency has warned the public about the dangers of flame retardants known as organohalogens that are found in baby toys, mattresses, furniture and electronics. (Pexels)

Why Canada must ban these harmful chemicals

The U.S. Consumer Protection Safety Commission has recommended a wide-spread ban on an entire class of flame retardants. Here's how Canada could follow suit.
Climate change could severely impact the world’s coffee-producing nations and turn a cup of decent java into a luxury in the years to come. (Shutterstock)

Climate change will roast the coffee industry

By 2100, more than 50 per cent of the land now used to grow coffee will no longer be arable. Climate change is changing the game to such an extent that Canada could one day become a coffee producer.
North Korea is no doubt watching closely as the region moves forward on energy cooperation. House Committee on Foreign Affairs/Flickr

Climate change fixes on the Korean peninsula

Green détente options could help South Korea ease the diplomatic tensions in the region.
Is there such a thing as a victim-less steak? Matthew Dillon/Flickr

Lab-grown meat won’t solve meat’s problems

Based on a seductive story of providing food with zero consequences, cellular agriculture promises to get rid of the ethical, environmental and health costs of animal husbandry. But is that realistic?
EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is an unabashed ally of the fossil fuels – industry his agency is supposed to regulate. AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar

Repeal of environmental rules favours robber barons

The Trump administration is committed to deregulating industry, as it's done with the EPA Clean Power Plan. But a historian shows how regulations have actually benefited both industry and consumers.
TVA Kingston Fossil Plant in Tennessee, site of a 1.1 billion gallon spill of coal ash slurry in 2008, photographed on March 28, 2012. Appalachian Voices

Trump’s policies will harm coal communities

Rural development experts say the best way to help coal communities by is investing in people, infrastructure and a clean environment. Instead, President Trump's budget cuts programs in these areas.
Mountain ash in the Victorian Central Highlands. Takver/Flickr

Putting a price on a tree

How do you determine the financial benefit of cutting a tree down, versus leaving it standing? Environmental accounting offers some insight.

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