Nearly one-third of tropical animal species face extinction if humans do not curb our growing appetites for beef, pork and other land-intensive meats. The Panamanian golden frog bred by the Vancouver Aquarium in this 2014 file photo may be extinct in its natural habitat. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Bacon for brunch? Your meal choices could kill hundreds of species

Technology, like this tea-picking machine in Kenya, can harness agriculture’s power to change lives. Reuters/Thomas Mukoya

How science could lift farming in Africa

Governments on the African continent must increase their investment in research and development so that science can yield self-sufficiency.
Ethiopian girls carrying water. Waterdotorg

Women still carry most of the world’s water

According to a new UN report, more than two billion people around the world do not have access to clean, safe water in their homes. Most of the work of getting water falls to women and girls.
The same beach on Henderson Island, in 1992 and 2015.

Your garbage is pollutes island paradise

After making worldwide headlines with the story of the Pacific "garbage island", researchers were sent a photo of the same beach, white sand free of litter, as recently as 1992.
Selling these new bags at 15 cents each, effectively creates another revenue stream with nearly A$71 million in gross profit. Paul Miller/AAP

Getting rid of plastic bags won’t help environment

Moves by major to supermarkets to only offer plastic bags for a charge could make these businesses more than a million dollars a year, but it may only have a small impact on the environment.
Green is the new Black. Smart is the new sexy. From the Peggy Sue Collection produced in Canada using organic materials and ethical techniques.

Fashion designers answer environmental crisis

The fashion industry is facing an environmental crisis: Canadian designers have an opportunity to be leaders in a new sustainable fashion movement.
Tesla CEO Elon Musk has announced plans to build the world’s biggest lithium-ion battery in South Australia. AAP Image/Ben Macmahon

Tesla’s giant South Australian battery

Tesla's new battery will be big enough to power thousands of homes, but it's likely to be just the first of many such installations.
This wood tower on Bikeman islet, in the central Pacific island nation of Kiribati, used to be on the sand. Now it’s in the water. Further out, locals fish. David Gray/Reuters

Rising sea temperatures will hit fisheries and communities in poor countries the hardest

A new study finds that even in best-case scenarios, the fishing communities most hurt by climate change are on small island nations such as Kiribati, the Solomon Islands and the Maldives.
Birdwatchers are keeping the location of the newly rediscovered night parrot a closely guarded secret. Adventure Australia

How to keep rare species’ data away from poachers

With the right approach to data security, scientists' discoveries of the locations of rare and sought-after species needn't leave a trail for poachers to follow.
Miners in several countries have suffered the side-effects of the gold bonanza. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)

Silicosis’s toxic legacy offers lessons today

Canada rushed to counter a deadly lung disease afflicting gold miners in the early 20th century. The "quick fix" cure that was invented is a symbol of the lurch towards global industrialization.
Dancing sunlight patterns reflected onto an interior ceiling from a wind-disturbed external water surface. Kevin Nute

Bringing the weather indoors

Research shows that bringing nature indoors, in the form of movement created by light, wind and water, makes occupants calmer and more productive. It also could promote interest in sustainable design.
The crack along the Larsen C ice has grown significantly over the past few weeks. EPA/NASA/John Sonntag

Don’t fear the huge Antarctic iceberg – just the glaciers behind it

A huge iceberg is set to break free from Antarctica. While the iceberg isn't hugely concerning, it could herald the breakup of the entire Larsen C ice shelf, which could trigger more sea-level rise.

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