Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg announces the launch of Oculus Go virtual reality headset in October. (Handout)

Oculus and our troubles with (virtual) reality

Will the arrival and popularity of Oculus Go and other VR systems make us think differently about alternative realities and so-called alternative facts?
Turtles can’t head south for the winter, so they hibernate in rivers, lakes and ponds. (Pexels)

Turtle hibernation secret: Butt-breathing

Crisp temperatures, ice-capped ponds and frozen landscapes send animals scurrying for cover. But just what do turtles do when winter takes hold?
While most Canadian nurses still use some paper charting systems, robots are being developed to complete intimate nursing tasks. Nurses need to embrace technological change, to direct their own future. (Shutterstock)

Nurses of the future must embrace high-tech

Will nurses eventually be replaced by robots? Nurses themselves need to engage with the ongoing technological revolution in healthcare - to shape the future of the profession.
The act of spending money to impress others is a signal of resources to potential mates. Having resources is a valued trait by females. (Shamim Nakhai/Unsplash)

What your photo says about you in Tinder age

Dating apps have changed the way people present themselves. Visual cues and short 100 word bios are the new currency of dating.
Right now there are more than 20,000 objects in space. NASA

Why we need a traffic cop in space

By taking on the role as leader in space traffic management, Australia can gain international power and exploit commercial opportunities.
An artist’s impression of the exoplanet in close orbit to a star. ESA, NASA, G. Tinetti (University College London, UK & ESA) and M. Kornmesser (ESA/Hubble)

Eccentric exoplanet orbit extraordinary: scientists

A solitary planet in an eccentric orbit around an ancient star may help astronomers understand exactly how such planetary systems are formed.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg initially dismissed as “crazy” the warnings that Russia had been using Facebook to spread propaganda in the 2016 U.S. election. He has since apologized and introduced plans and tools aimed at fighting false information on the platform. In this file photo, he delivers the commencement address at Harvard University in May. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

The case for regulating social media firms

In a fight for the global flow of information, social media firms must be regulated. Their billions of dollars in revenue put their financial interests in conflict with truth and democracy.
A leading Twitch streamer was disciplined for gender bias. Screenshot of Trainwreckstv on Twitch

Can online gaming ditch its sexist ways?

Many online communities have developed toxic social norms, including sexist tendencies, that they will need to address as more members join in.
Earthquake survivors are living in tents in western Iran. AP Photo/Vahid Salemi

Iran-Iraq earthquake spurs work on fault map

The Nov. 12 earthquake wasn't centered on any known major faults in the Earth's crust. In its wake, scientists will collect data to add detail to what they know about seismic activity in the area.
Research shows that when parents engage in simple science projects with their kids at home, it boosts their learning in school. (Shutterstock)

Science at home boosts kids’ academic success

From collecting bugs to using math apps, there are many ways parents can engage in STEM activities with their kids to support their learning.
African Americans are being misdiagnosed with the heart condition (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) that caused the sudden death of basketball player Hank Gathers (pictured left with teammate Bo Kimble) in 1990. Lack of ethnic diversity in genomic databases is a big part of the reason for these misdiagnoses. (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac, File)

How the genomics health revolution fails ethnic minorities

Genome sequencing is transforming the way we diagnose disease. But lack of diversity in genomic data means only some Canadians will benefit from this revolutionary technology.
Somaliland’s shift to use iris recognition in a presidential election stems from distrust in the voting system. Shutterstock

Somaliland’s voting tech shows Africa can lead

In a remarkable extension of technological leapfrogging, Somaliland will become the first country in the world to use iris recognition in a presidential election.

Editor's picks

More

How we are different

10 reasons

Most Read past week

  1. Myth of the genius solitary scientist is dangerous
  2. Beyond Bitcoin: The power struggle over trust-based technology
  3. Science in the home boosts children’s academic success
  4. Oculus and our troubles with (virtual) reality
  5. How to grow cannabis? With modern science and technology

Pitch an idea

Got a news tip or article idea for The Conversation?

Tell us

Our Audience

The Conversation has a monthly audience of 5 million users, and reach of 35 million through Creative Commons republication.

Want to Write?

Write an article and join a growing community of more than 59,200 academics and researchers from 2,222 institutions.

Register now