Developmental psychology suggests that fantastical beliefs in children are associated with positive developmental outcomes. And parents need not worry, children will bust the Santa myth themselves, when the time is right. (Shutterstock)

Lies about Santa could be good for your child

It’s exam time. Research suggests that while some students will be pleasantly surprised by how they did on exams, a larger group will falsely believe they did much better on their exams than they did. (Shutterstock)

Grades: How confidence can hinder success

Research shows that many students are excessively optimistic about course grades. Those with a stronger sense of personal control are also less likely to receive the grades they expect.
How can you maximize reading’s rewards for baby? aijiro/Shutterstock.com

The best books for a baby’s brain

Psychology researchers bring infants into the lab to learn more about how shared book reading influences brain and behavioral development.
Children must be taught to read for comprehension, not just to parrot what they hear. Shutterstock

Why South Africa has a reading crisis

The problem in learners' reading performance lies in how reading is taught in most South African schools. Learners are not taught to understand the written word and make sense of it for themselves.
Internet safety in early childhood is a new area of research because, until now, children as young as four weren’t able to easily access the internet. Shutterstock

Teach your preschooler about internet safety

Touchscreen technologies have made it easy for children as young as four to go online. Here are some things to teach them about how to be safe on the internet.
The framing of Motion 103, combatting Islamophobia, may seem like a distant concern to the free speech debate in universities, but it is in fact related in the way the so-called “alt-right” uses free speech as a rhetorical prop in their campaigns of ideological intimidation. Here: Protesters rally over motion M-103, the Liberal anti-Islamophobia motion, on Parliament Hill in Ottawa in March. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

Transphobia, Islamophobia and the free speech alibi

Right-wing ideologues use free speech as an alibi for their transphobic and Islamophobic rhetoric.
People demonstrate in Toronto in August 2017 in solidarity with those at a University of Virginia rally against white supremacy. That demonstration ended in tragedy after a woman was killed by a white supremacist. Universities in both the U.S. and Canada are at the centre of fierce debates about free speech and the right of those on the far right to be heard. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Why universities must ditch the dogma

In such a polarized age, universities and colleges should uphold the core values of liberal education by asserting, through their policies and practices, the reasonable, rational middle ground.
Christmas lists usually suggest the latest and greatest technology, but blocks are still the best toy you can buy your child. Shutterstock

Blocks are still the best holiday gift

Blocks probably won't top Christmas wish lists, but they have many benefits including developing fine motor skills, social, cognitive and language skills, and spatial reasoning and language.
file ubn. Marin Dacos/VisualHunt

Understanding children’s mirror writing

Spontaneous mirror writing by both left- and right-handed children has long remained a mystery. Recent studies of brain processing and writing have led to an unexpected explanation.
Career changers are intrinsically motivated and tend to be more committed to teaching, having changed careers later in life. Shutterstock

Want to solve our STEM skills problem? Bring in the professionals

STEM professionals who change careers to become teachers are often intrinsically motivated, and can help engage kids in STEM subjects with their real-world experience.
Academic research and coursework on giving and volunteering are growing more popular. Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock.com

How students can become philanthropists

After taking a class in which they give money away, students get more interested in donating to and volunteering at local nonprofits.
For a student who is blind, the obvious test adjustment is providing a braille test if they are proficient in braille. Shutterstock

Standardised tests limit students with disability

Standardised tests restrict how well students with disability can do, which reinforces the idea that there are things they can't do that children without disability can.
In school makerspaces, students problem-solve with traditional craft materials alongside. digital technologies such as 3D printing, virtual reality, programmable robots and video work.

How to help kids innovate from an early age

Creative makerspaces in Ontario schools weave passion with digital technologies to teach 21st century skills.
The Ottoman empire facilitated the movement of ideas and people across Europe and Asia. Wikimedia

Why the idea of ‘western civilization’ is outmoded

The new Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation aims to 'revive' liberal arts and the humanities. Yet the 'civilisation' model of history is now viewed as deeply flawed.

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  1. Lies about Santa? They could be good for your child
  2. Five great reads to help teens become critical thinkers
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  5. Transphobia, Islamophobia and the free speech alibi

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