Plans for a new bridge between Detroit and Windsor, Ont., named after hockey great Gordie Howe, will increase the flow of goods between Canada and the U.S. But Canada’s current trade war with the United States means the country should diversify its economy by relying less on its southern neighbour. HE CANADIAN PRESS/Dave Chidley

Canada must find new global markets

Management academics often face students in their classrooms with more practical experience in the business world than they have. But management is an important inter-disciplinary field that has a lot to offer business executives. (Shutterstock)

Why management academics matter

Millennials dream of home ownership. In expensive cities like Toronto and Vancouver, they’re saving up to buy homes by living with their parents or taking on tenants once they save up enough to buy. (Shutterstock)

How millennials are managing to buy homes

Canadians are spending more of their money on restaurants. In turn, restaurants have an impact on what we eat at home. (Shutterstock)

Restaurants shape our food preferences

Restaurants are playing an increasingly influential role in how we live. We not only patronize them more often, they also influence our choices at the grocery store.
Cattle that are grass-fed, antibiotic- and growth hormone-free gather at a farm in Oregon in 2015. There’s a debate over whether antibiotic use in livestock makes germs more resistant to the drugs, and results in infections being passed on to humans who consume the meat. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

Reducing antibiotics in farm animals isn’t easy

The use of antibiotics in raising livestock is complex. We could be moving towards a less-than-ideal result due to poor understanding, over-simplistic messaging and a rush for competitive advantage.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with U.S. President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C. in October 2017. Trump’s tariffs on Canadian aluminum and steel simply reflect a broader U.S. philosophy on international trade, and that doesn’t bode well for Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Trade war

How Trump’s tariffs are much bigger than Trump

The underlying problem with Donald Trump's tariffs on steel and aluminum isn't Trump. It's the increasing willingness by the U.S. to impose its will on its neighbours amid rising economic nationalism.
The Trudeau government is punching back with tariffs on American goods. But is it really a good strategy? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Trade war

Canada punches back against U.S. tariffs

From a public relations perspective, the Canadian government's retaliatory tariffs against the U.S. are a win. But the tariffs on everything from mayo to orange juice will hurt Canadian consumers.
Snowshoe hares near the now closed Giant Mine outside of Yellowknife, N.W.T show signs of arsenic contamination. (Denali NPS/flickr)

Toxic leftovers from mine found in snowshoe hares

Historical gold mining at the Giant Mine near Yellowknife, N.W.T. released toxic arsenic into the environment. Snowshoe hares are showing signs of poisoning.
Demonstrators protest the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion – and compare Justin Trudeau to Donald Trump – at a gathering in Vancouver on May 29, 2018. The controversy over the pipeline requires a national compromise. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canadians deserve a real pipeline compromise

The Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion is fast becoming one of the most divisive issues in Canadian politics in years. Here's how a compromise can be reached.
A aerial view of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain marine terminal, in Burnaby, B.C., is shown on Tues., May 29, 2018. (Jonathan Hayward/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Canada’s Paris-pipeline paradox

Canada wants to move towards a green economy and meet its Paris Agreement targets, but it has also just taken ownership of a pipeline. How can the federal government deal with this paradox?
A negative performance review along with the knowledge that one is not considered to be ‘highly sought after talent,’ can be demotivating to your staff. Štefan Štefančík/ Unsplash

Should your boss raise your incompetence?

Don't tell your employee they are not doing well, according to new research. "White lies" coming form managers to staff about how well they are doing can help with their motivation.
A For Sale sign is shown outside a house under construction in a new subdivision in Beckwith, Ont., in January 2018. Conventional wisdom suggests urban-dwelling millennials don’t want to live in the suburbs and don’t want to raise children in a two-bedroom downtown condo. Is it really true? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

The myths about millennials & housing

If it's true millennials are being squeezed out of the housing market in some of Canada's biggest cities, here's what we can, and should, do about it.
Unpaid interns protests in Geneva in 2016. Activism has played a big part in how unpaid internships are now being regarded with disdain. (Global Intern Coalition)

How unpaid internships were vanquished

Global activism has played a big role in outlawing unpaid internships. Here's how protests and social media shaming spurred negative media coverage of unpaid internships.
President Donald Trump makes a comment at the White House in March 2018, when he signed proclamations on steel and aluminum imports. Watching as Trump leaves are, from left, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Trade war

It’s time to call the bluff on the ‘Bluffer-in-Chief’

Donald Trump's 'Art of the Deal' may be all about talking tough, bluffing and bullying, but as any poker player knows, there comes a time to call a bluff. If there ever was such a time, this is it.
People listen during a protest against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion on May 29, 2018. The federal government’s decision to buy the project doesn’t inspire confidence for potential investors eyeing Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Pipelines & Canada’s investment climate

The decision of the Canadian government to purchase the $4.5 billion Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project doesn't exactly instil confidence in Canada's investment climate.
Houston Rockets head coach Mike D'Antoni, during Game 2 of the NBA basketball Western Conference finals against the Golden State Warriors in Houston. D'Antoni successfully resisted calls to change his team’s offensive strategy after losing Game 1. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Management wisdom from the NBA

Research has shown that the most successful basketball coaches resist pressure to make changes during games. Choosing not to make a move is sometimes also the right call for business leaders.
A protester holds a photo of an oil-soaked Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during a demonstration against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion in Vancouver on May 29, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Justin Trudeau’s risky gamble on the Trans Mountain pipeline

The Trudeau government's decision to buy the Trans Mountain pipeline from Kinder Morgan is incredibly risky. Here's why.
Ambassador of China to Canada Lu Shaye is photographed at the Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in Ottawa on May 24, 2018, following the announcement that Canada had turned down China’s takeover bid for Aecon. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Canada has no clue how to deal with China

In the wake of the Canadian government's rejection of a Chinese takeover bid for construction company Aecon, Canada must drop the 'Red Scare' rhetoric and figure out how to engage with a rising China.
You’re not imagining things. The quantities of packaged foods really are shrinking as food manufacturers try to avoid hiking prices. Shrinkflation however is beginning to irritate consumers who feel they’re being cheated. (Shutterstock)

Shrinkflation: Less is not more at the grocery store

Canadians are bargain-hunters when it comes to food, and so food manufacturers try to keep prices low. But does that mean they should engage in 'shrinkflation?'
Tobacco leaves dry on a farm in Africa. Big tobacco companies exploit impoverished African farmers, particularly in Malawi. On World No Tobacco Day, it’s time to focus on the tactics of Big Tobacco in Africa. (Shutterstock)

It’s time for Malawi to quit tobacco

On World No Tobacco Day, the focus is usually on the health risks of cigarettes. But what about the way Big Tobacco exploits impoverished farmers in Malawi?

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