Production facility manager Derek Delahaye eats roasted crickets at the Entomo Farms cricket processing facility in Norwood, Ont., in 2016. Bugs are a diet staple in most parts of the world. Will Canadians join the masses in their search for alternate sources of protein to meat? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Thornhill

Less meat, more bugs in our dietary future

In this November 2017 photo, U.S. President Donald Trump talks to Chinese President Xi Jinping during a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. The brewing China-U.S. trade conflict features two leaders who have expressed friendship but are equally determined to pursue their nation’s interests. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

Why China should choose honesty

Stacks of used clothing are seen in this African warehouse. The U.S. is retaliating against countries that are restricting the import of American used clothing, a marginal industry for the U.S. but a critical one for some African nations. (Shutterstock)

America’s petty policy on used clothes for Africa

This 2013 photo shows Bitcoin tokens at a shop in Utah. What does the future hold for the volatile cryptocurrency? (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Bitcoin’s wild ride and what’s ahead

The fate of Bitcoin’s fate is highly unpredictable and dependent on what governments will do in the future.
Filling out tax forms used to be an exercise in legalese torture for Canadian taxpayers. Canada has come a long way, but can still to more to simplify filing taxes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Doing taxes used to be an even bigger pain

In the 1950s, Canada made it easy for employees to file their income tax. Now let's simplify the process for others, too.
Is there still room for the U.S.? AP Photo/Esteban Felix

What is the TPP and can the US get back in?

Trump, who withdrew the US from the Trans-Pacific Partnership when he became president, briefly appeared to consider joining the trade accord again.
An obese Quebec man is seen in this photo. Canada is resisting U.S. attempts during NAFTA renegotiations to stop it from putting labels on processed foods to warn of their health risks. (Shutterstock)

NAFTA will make us fat if the U.S. has its way

The U.S. is vehemently opposed to Canada's intention to put labels on unhealthy processed foods. Here's why Canada should continue to stand its ground during NAFTA renegotiations.
Thousands of people are dying every year of opioid-related overdoses, in an epidemic that traces its roots to 1996 and the introduction of the prescription drug OxyContin. Here, prescription opioids are shown in Toronto during 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy

How Big Pharma deceives you about drug safety

Prescription drugs are policed by industry and Health Canada has never prosecuted a drug company for illegally marketing a drug.
The Loblaws bread price-fixing scandal may have eroded public trust in the company, but will it truly hurt the grocery giant in the long run? Galen G. Weston, executive president and chairman of Loblaw Ltd., is seen in this 2016 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Thornhill

Loblaws will survive price-fixing scandal

Loblaws' reputation has taken a hit following the bread price-fixing scandal. But will it do prolonged damage to Canada's biggest grocery chain?
The elite women at the starting line of the 2017 Boston Marathon, a 26.2-mile distance competition. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm)

Boston Marathon: How ads target women

Women endurance runners are being celebrated in the advertising world yet the ads also create negative sentiments by focusing on 'ideal' running bodies - long, lean and masculine.
Taxing sugar places the burden on the poor – people who are already burdened by higher rates of heart disease, obesity and diabetes. (Shutterstock)

How sugar taxes punish the people

Sugar taxes fail to tackle the root of the problem -- the production and marketing of foods that cause chronic disease.
original. Shawn Thew/EPA/AAP

Zuckerberg apology: ‘Shit happens’

A corporate apology is always connected to the benefits it brings to the company. It is not a personal apology, it is a form of institutional positioning.
In this November 2017 photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg meets with a group of entrepreneurs and innovators in St. Louis. Zuckerberg is preparing to testify before U.S. Congress over Facebook’s privacy fiasco. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

#DeleteFacebook? Or not?

Why are the masses not disconnecting from Facebook despite the litany of revelations that the company's brass has long viewed them as dumb sheep?
Canada’s minister of international development, Marie-Claude Bibeau, launches Canada’s new Feminist International Assistance Policy during an event in Ottawa in June 2017. Canada is set to announce a feminist foreign policy soon. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Arms exports and feminist foreign policy

Sweden has enacted what's known as a feminist foreign policy, and Canada plans on doing the same. One fly in the ointment is both countries' arms sales and how they're at odds with feminism.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in an armchair discussion highlighting the federal budget’s investments in Canadian innovation at the University of Ottawa in March 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Made by humans: A recipe for innovation

Where and how do we learn to innovate? Our parents can’t teach us. Our bosses are trying to learn alongside us. Even post-secondary courses only provide us with the basics. Follow this recipe.
The captain of a Finnish icebreaker looks out from the bridge as it sails into floating sea ice on the Victoria Strait while traversing the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago in July 2017. The waterways of the Arctic are of particular interest to non-Arctic jurisdictions like China and the European Union. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Why the Arctic isn’t a ‘global commons’

The recent Arctic Council meeting in Finland shows there's still avid interest in developing the Arctic. Some are arguing the entire region should be considered a 'global commons.'
A sprawling subdivision in Vaughan, Ont., a growing “boomburb” north of Toronto. (Shutterstock)

Toronto’s northern boomburbs

Urban growth and landscape transformations in York region: How Vaughan and Markham are exploding.
Pints of craft beer are seen on the bar at Main Street Brewing in Vancouver. Craft beer is experiencing an explosion in popularity. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canada’s craft beer explosion

Canada's craft beer industry is exploding. But antiquated regulations stemming from the years of the temperance movement is preventing big acquisitions by larger brewers.

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