Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, left, with World Health Organization Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, right, and Nigerian Health Minister Isaac Folorunso Adewole, at the End TB Summit in New Delhi, India, March 13, 2018. (AP Photo)

World TB Day

Hope rises for a world free of TB

The free speech wars rage on but there is an essential difference between free speech and hate speech. Words shape the way we think about the world. (Jason Rosewell/Unsplash)

Confronting hate speech

The Iguazu Falls in Brazil are part of the Guarani Aquifer, one of the world’s major underground reserves of fresh water. The 8th World Water Forum, part of 2018 World Water Day, is being held in Brazil, home to the most fresh water on Earth. (Shutterstock)

World Water Day

Why every day should be World Water Day

Water is one of our most precious resources, yet it's in danger. World Water Day reminds us of the need to develop policies and governance to avoid squandering water.
Nellie McClung, a prominent Canadian suffragist in the early 1900s, is now being maligned for her racism and support of eugenics. Should the deep flaws of some suffragists from 100 years ago mean Canadian historians must pay them short shrift? (National Archives)

Canada’s curiously cautious commemoration of women suffragists

Canada is strangely muted in celebrating women's suffrage. That's because the politics of remembrance has become a contemporary minefield.
People attend a rally in memory of Tina Fontaine in Montreal, Saturday, February 24, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Tina Fontaine murder & the ‘Mr. Big’ method

The police investigation in the Raymond Cormier case relied on a controversial undercover technique known as Mr. Big, a method prohibited in the U.S., U.K and Germany.
Canada is on track to legalize marijuana on July 1. But why was it criminalized in the first place? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

How pot-smoking became illegal in Canada

Canada is legalizing marijuana on July 1. But how the drug became criminalized in the first place is an interesting saga that involves anti-Chinese racism and international influence.
Abdoul Abdi, right, is seen in this Facebook photo as a child. (Facebook)

The cruelty of deporting this man to Somalia

A longtime Crown ward since he was a child refugee, Abdoul Abdi is far more of a product of Canada than Somalia. Why is the government attempting to deport him after failing him so badly as a child?
The Shape of Water offers a clever allegory to Donald’s Trump’s presidency, with Michael Shannon’s character (on the left) representing some of the president’s worst qualities. (Kerry Hayes/Fox Searchlight Pictures)

The Shape of Water: Allegorical Trump critique

Not everyone can escape to the ocean's depths to avoid the Trump presidency, but we can escape to the movies. 'The Shape of Water' reminds audiences of the humanity of those who are marginalized.
Former U.S. president Richard Nixon is seen here with Pierre Trudeau in Ottawa in 1972. Nixon was bitterly opposed to Canada’s Auto Pact moves 50 years ago, saying Canada had cheated at the expense of American jobs and investment. He refused calls to exempt Canada from an import surcharge. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Canada can’t rely on special U.S. treatment

U.S. President Donald Trump has exempted Canada, for now, from hefty tariffs on steel. An increase in defence spending would likely stand Canada in greater stead with the president.
Could universal pharmacare reduce excessive drug price hikes in Canada? Eric Hoskins, former Ontario Minister of Health, will chair a federal government advisory council to implement a national pharmacare plan. Hoskins is pictured here with federal Minister of Health Ginette Petitpas Taylor. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

Can Pharmacare fix chaotic drug prices?

The cost of a life-saving drug in Canada is rising by 3,000 per cent. A national pharmacare plan could bring order to this chaotic world of Canadian drug prices.
Russian President Vladimir Putin has been described as a Byzantine Emperor in style, positioning Russia as the “third Rome.” In western history books, on the other hand, the Bzyantine Empire is all but ignored, pointing as it does to the east. AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)

The Byzantine history of Putin’s Russian empire

Russian president Vladimir Putin draws upon the imperial symbols of the Byzantine Empire to position Russia as the "third Rome." Meanwhile, Byzantium is erased by western history books.
Students from South Plantation High School, carrying placards, protest in support of gun control. Carlos Garcia/Reuters

What the National School Walkout says about schools and free speech

When students walked out of school to protest what they see as lax gun laws, some risked punishment from their schools. But it may be worth it to send a message, a First Amendment scholar argues.

How Calgary can become a climate leader

Canada has committed to cutting GHG emissions 30 per cent by 2030 from 2005 levels. Can Canada's oil capital lead the charge? New research shows it's within reach with bold actions on several fronts.
Donald Trump’s grasp of most matters in international politics and military affairs is rudimentary. But he’s in charge, so his views bear analysis. AAP

Why war with North Korea is possible

It is not yet midnight, but as the crisis deepens, the diplomatic and military options get more and more complex. And the possibility of war with North Korea is now very real.
There are widespread fears that so-called echo chambers and filter bubbles are leading to political polarization that poses a danger to democracy. But are the fears unfounded? (Melvin Sokolsky/1963 via Creative Commons)

The myth of the echo chamber

Despite fears that so-called echo chambers are causing political polarization, a new study suggests it's not the case.
The fact that Ontario’s health minister, Eric Hoskins, is resigning from his post to head up a newly announced advisory council on a Canadian pharmacare system bodes well, meaning Ottawa’s new initiative may go beyond being “just another study.” Hoskins is a longtime advocate for pharmacare. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canadian pharmacare: Soon a reality?

Will Ottawa's new advisory council on pharmacare amount to "just another study," or is a national program truly within reach?
Mona Nemer was named as Canada’s new Chief Science Advisor on Sept. 26, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Improving government’s use of science

Science advisers can make important contributions to environmental policy and decision making by government. But we should expect even more.
A welder fabricates a steel structure at an iron works facility in Ottawa on March 5, 2018. U.S.President Donald Trump’s stated intention to impose new tariffs on steel and aluminum imports could start a trade war. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada can’t win a trade war with the U.S.

Ottawa seems utterly unprepared for a trade war with the United States. The recent federal budget upholding equity values is noble, but won't mean a thing if the government runs out of cash.
Women face myriad barriers running for office and it’s time to knock down those obstacles starting at the municipal level. In this November 2017 photo, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland sits between Maryam Monsef, Minister of Status of Women, right, and Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie. (The Canadian Press/Sean Kilpatrick)

International Women's Day

How to ensure more women run for public office

Canadian women are under-represented in politics and are hesitant to run for office for myriad reasons. Here's what needs to be done, especially at the municipal level, to get more women in office.
On International Women’s Day in 2016, a demonstrator carries a cross that reads in Spanish: “For you, for all” to protest violence against women. International Women’s Day is much more widely celebrated in Latin America than it is in Canada and the United States, but injustices for women is a global phenomenon. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

International Women's Day

Women must keep fighting — everywhere

Women everywhere have low status relative to men. This is a global phenomenon and there are no exceptions, and there is much work to be done in Canada and everywhere. The time is now.
Chinese women carry a disproportionate share of family responsibilities. Having more children and greater family demands could increase women’s work-family conflicts and jeopardize women’s careers. With the two-child policy, conflicts between work and family responsibilities are likely to worsen. Shutterstock

International Women's Day

The impact on women of China’s two-child policy

How does the two-child policy in China impact women's equality? Do women have the ability to stop when they no longer want more children?
A Polish cow who escaped while on her way to the slaughterhouse is seen here with her new companions, a herd of wild bison. It’s time to treat the animals who work so hard for us with humanity and compassion. (Rafal Kowalczyk via AP)

Why we must reward animals

Animals do so much work for humans, from farm animals who die to feed us to service animals helping veterans with PTSD. It's time we gave back by providing humane living and working conditions.

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