It is estimated that 1.2 million children in Canada live in low income households and 10 per cent of families with children under the age of six report some degree of food insecurity. This places kids at increased risk of developmental vulnerability. (Shutterstock)

Canada needs a ‘Children’s Charter’

President Donald Trump tosses paper towels into a crowd at Calvary Chapel in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico in October 2017 following Hurricane Maria. Trump congratulated Puerto Rico for escaping the higher death toll of “a real catastrophe like Katrina.” A new study suggests almost 3,000 people died in Puerto Rico. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Politics, paper towels and disaster death tolls

The Second Cup Ltd. says it is actively reviewing locations in Ontario for potential conversion to cannabis stores in light of a decision by the new provincial government to allow private retailers to sell the drug. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Cannabis with your coffee in Ontario?

Ontario Premier Doug Ford speaks to reporters in Toronto on Sept. 10, 2018, after announcing he’ll invoke the notwithstanding clause in his battle to shrink Toronto city council. Is Ford taking on the “Court Party?” THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov.

Doug Ford’s attack on the ‘Court Party’

Canadian troops arrive to a UN base in Gao, Mali, on in June 2018, amid an insurgency by jihadist and ethnic rebel groups. Canada has yet to impose sanctions on the African country because it lacks names to target for asset freezes and other measures. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada’s challenges with sanctions

The ongoing NAFTA renegotiations could put a Canadian national pharmacare program in jeopardy, and could have a particular impact on Canadians who need expensive arthritis drugs. (Shutterstock)

NAFTA negotiations may threaten pharmacare

The ongoing NAFTA renegotiations could put a Canadian national pharmacare program in jeopardy, and have a particular impact on Canadians who need expensive arthritis drugs. Here's how.
More than 80 per cent of the plasma Canada now uses for medical purposes comes from paid donation in the United States. (Shutterstock)

Canadians should be paid for plasma donation

Canada suffers a shortage of vital blood plasma. Paying donors, through a non-profit like Canadian Blood Services, would secure a local supply without lining the pockets of corporate shareholders.
President Donald Trump speaks at a rally at the Rimrock Auto Arena in Billings, Mont., Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Urquhart)

Trump has the best spot in American politics

Disparate groups that include white nationalists, business elites and evangelical Christians have all tried to put a leader in the White House. They all failed -- until Donald Trump came along.
‘Hotel Mumbai’ is a gripping film that provides a glimpse into the fear and brutality of terrorism but also the everyday bravery of its victims. Here Armie Hammer in ‘Hotel Mumbai.’ Courtesy of TIFF

Terrorism at the Taj: ‘Hotel Mumbai’ pulls no punches

'Hotel Mumbai,' which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, is an 'anthem of resistance;' a film that highlights the things ordinary people can do in extraordinary circumstances.
Improved access to Canada’s dairy market for American producers is one of the key unresolved NAFTA issues. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

NAFTA

Two key issues to bring Canada back into NAFTA

Canada and the United States are back at the table to try to save NAFTA negotiations. Two key issues need to be resolved.
Mexico, Canada and the United States are struggling to agree on new NAFTA terms. Reuters/Rebecca Cook

Lobbyists will ensure Canada stays in NAFTA

A political scientist explains why corporate lobbyists and other interest groups will thwart Trump's efforts to strong-arm or ignore Canada.
People hold artwork of various marine life and youth during a rally celebrating a recent federal court ruling against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, in Vancouver, on Sept. 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

No easy resolution for Trans Mountain pipeline

Contrary to what some have suggested, the uncertainty over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion will be drawn out.
People buy fruits and vegetables in May 2017 at the Jean-Talon farmers market in Montreal. (Shutterstock)

Canadian food policy inches closer to reality

A government report on an upcoming national food policy is an optimistic indication that it will result in both healthier and more sustainable food for Canadians and stronger agri-food industry.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford speaks to reporters in Toronto on Sept. 10, 2018. He’s vowing to invoke the seldom used notwithstanding clause in his fight to slash the size of Toronto city council. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov.

The history of the notwithstanding clause

The notwithstanding clause in Canada's Charter of Rights and Freedoms has seldom been used. But it's not totally gathering dust, and now Ontario Premier Doug Ford is threatening to wield it.
A line of protesters against the construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline on the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota head to a unity rally on the west steps of the State Capitol in September 2016 in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Protecting heritage is a human right

Development projects are claiming ancestral sites at alarming rates. This ineffective protection of Indigenous heritage is a violation of human rights.
Eroding civility is not just a U.S. phenomenon. We need to learn how to speak to each other, no matter what our politics. (Shutterstock)

Making society civil again

Eroding civility is not just an American phenomenon; it's global. But it's time for a return to civility as we reflect on how we will be judged and remembered when the dust of history settles upon us.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at a news conference in Ottawa in June 2018. A United Nations housing watchdog has criticized the Liberals over what it sees as their about-face on a promise to put a human rights lens on its housing strategy. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Canada’s spotty record on human rights

If the liberal international order is to survive, countries like Canada will need to defend international human rights law.
An asylum-seeker saying he’s from Eritrea is confronted by an RCMP officer as he crosses the border into Canada from the United States on Aug. 21 near Champlain, N.Y. Canadians have false beliefs about the so-called migration crisis, and politicians are capitalizing on it. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

The dangerous politics on migration

Canada's opposition Conservatives are borrowing from European populists in stoking fears about asylum-seekers and migrants. Here's why that's so dangerous.
Edmonton’s new NHL arena opened in 2016 and was partially funded by $226 million from the City of Edmonton. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Secrecy in deals for sports stadiums

The Calgary Flames are the latest pro sports team asking for public funds for a new arena. Cities across North America help fund sports facilities, but with little transparency and accountability
Should wealthy Canadians pay an inheritance tax? In this photo from 2002, David Thomson listens during the annual meeting of Thomson Corp. The Thomsons are considered Canada’s richest family. (CP PHOTO/Aaron Harris)

Should Canada have an inheritance tax?

Canada is the only G7 country that doesn't have an inheritance tax. A new report says that should change. The idea of sharing the wealth from one generation to another is not new.
Protesters opposed to the Trans Mountain pipeline extension demonstrate in Vancouver in June 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Trans Mountain: Everyone needs to chill

The ruling against the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline project doesn't mean the end of the oil and gas industry in Canada. Other projects and approaches could go forward.
Will U.S. border officials have problems with Canadians who purchase weed online when they try to enter the country? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mark Blinch

How privatized pot sales threaten your privacy

As Canada moves to legalize marijuana and online sales become commonplace, privacy concerns can’t be an afterthought; they must be built into the system from the outset. That's not happening.

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