United States’ Simone Manuel who won the Olympic gold medal for the U.S. in the 100-meter freestyle at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, said she hopes for a day when there are more Black swimmers. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Swimming while Black

A man holds a sign at a memorial remembering the victims of the July 22, 2018 shooting in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mark Blinch

Toronto mass shooting: How the city is coping a month later

Toronto is still grappling with the fallout from two mass casualty events -- April's van attack and a mass shooting in July. A month after the shooting, how is Toronto moving forward?
Kids teething? Back in 1885, Mrs. Winslow’s Soothing Syrup, containing morphine, was close at hand and earned the nickname the “baby killer.” Concerns about the dangers of readily available medications played a big role in how Canada’s drug laws evolved. The U.S. National Library of Medicine

How opium panic influenced drug policy

Canadian drug policy began to take shape well before anti-immigration attacks on Chinese establishments in 1908. Drugs like opium and coke were causing grave public health concerns.
Specializing in a specific sport at an early age is not necessary to become an Olympic athlete. In fact, the opposite is true. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

The secret formula for becoming an elite athlete

Should athletes who dream of making it to the Olympics start their journey as young children? Research shows that specializing in a specific sport at a young age is not the best approach.
U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence speaks about the creation of a United States Space Force on Aug. 9, 2018 at the Pentagon. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Canadian tech could protect Space Force

Could Canadian technology play a part in the newly announced U.S. Space Force? A team at McMaster University has developed an instrument that could keep Space Force troops safe from radiation.
The wreckage of the fatal Humboldt Broncos bus crash outside of Tisdale, Sask., is seen on April, 7, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

After the Humboldt crash: Truck driver health

Truck drivers in Canada are exposed to many health risks. The horrific Humboldt bus crash should be a wake-up call for new regulations and wellness programs within the industry.
Ebola vaccination team member administering Ebola vaccine in Beni, North Kivu, DRC. UNICEF/MARK NAFTALIN HANDOUT

DRC may provide model for containing Ebola

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has been hit with another Ebola outbreak. This may be the test case for how to deal with future outbreaks.
The cause of nose bleeds is not always clear. From shutterstock.com

Health Check: why do we get nose bleeds?

More than half of us will have a nose bleed at some point in our life, probably more than once. But why do they actually happen, and are they a cause for concern?
Research shows that farm parents do not mindlessly expose their children to risks; rather they weigh them against the the positive impacts of involvement in the family’s agricultural heritage. (Shutterstock)

How to improve farm safety for kids

Instructing farmers to keep their kids away from farm machinery doesn't work to reduce traumatic injury. A recent research project tried listening instead.
Physical activity improves memory, problem-solving and decision-making ability. Active children have better executive functioning, including planning, self-regulation and the ability to perform demanding tasks with greater accuracy. (Shutterstock)

Children with disabilities need access to sport

Sport and other physical activity is vital to the developing bodies and minds of children; for those with disabilities it can be hard to access and is yet even more important.
New research shows the risk of lung cancer slowly increases five to 10 years after a breast radiation treatment; a form of brachytherapy developed in Canada is the safest treatment to reduce this risk. (Shutterstock)

The risk of lung cancer for young breast cancer survivors

New research reveals the risks of lung cancer after breast cancer radiotherapy and identifies the best treatment to reduce these risks.
Rwandan students on grounds of the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village near Rwamagana, in Rwanda., 2014. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Silence is healing for Rwandans born of rape

Is it always good to talk about violent pasts? Sixty Rwandan youths participated in a research project that aimed to understand the perspectives of people born of rapes committed during the genocide
Dads have a critical role to play in their children’s lives. Samuel Borges Photography/Shutterstock

Why dads matter

There are a number of barriers to a father's involvement in the first 1000 days of his child's life.
A woman cools down in a water fountain as she beats the heat in Montreal on Monday, July 2, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Climate change can be deadly if you live alone

Heatwave deaths this summer make it clear: climate change is a severe public health threat, and those who live alone are at greatest risk.
Many athletes stretch before and after exercise, but they may not be gaining benefits from doing so. ESB Basic/shutterstock.com

Stretching matters for weight loss and exercise

Who hasn't been told to stretch before and after exercise to prevent injury and improve performance? There may be no scientific evidence to back that up, although stretching has other benefits.
It’s barbecue season, a time of year that usually makes the meat industry happy. But an increasing number of Canadians, especially those under 35, are cutting out meat from their diets – a trend that should be causing serious alarm for meat producers. (Shutterstock)

The rise of the conscious carnivore

There have been an increasing number of reported anti-meat incidents around the world as more consumers second-guess their relationship with animal proteins. How can the meat industry adjust?
PrEP is effective as a protection against HIV – though condoms can still be used to prevent STDs. Why can’t we celebrate the idea that men can have sex without fear of death? (Shutterstock)

Gay men: Finally, sex without fear

Recently PrEP, an effective drug against HIV, was in the news with some concerns that gay men are no longer using condoms. But is the issue about condoms or control?

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