In 2016, parents protested the previous Ontario Liberal government’s decision to cut therapy for autistic children aged five and older. Moves by Ontario’s Conservative government have also raised concerns. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Ontario Autism Program changes will hurt kids

Data from provinces varies, but it generally shows Canadian cannabis users prefer to buy dry flowers (to smoke or vape their weed), want high-quality products and prefer shopping in bricks-and-mortar stores rather than online. Sharon McCutcheon/Unsplash

How Canadians are buying legal weed

Three sisters (winter squash, maize and climbing beans) summer garden at the University of Guelph. (Hannah Tait Neufeld)

Indigenous researchers plant seeds of hope

Indigenous food and medicine gardens, and traditional manikin (wild rice) harvesting offer hope -- for the future health of humanity and the earth that sustains us.
Ninety-eight per cent of children now live in homes with internet-connected devices. (Shutterstock)

Screen time predicts development delays

A new study in JAMA Pediatrics suggests higher levels of screen time at two and three years of age predict poorer child outcomes at three and five years, respectively.
Dogs are more sensitive than humans to the psychotropic (mind-altering) effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in cannabis products. (Unsplash/Ana Martin)

How to keep your pets safe from weed

Pets are vulnerable to cannabis toxicity - by ingesting cannabis products and also by inhaling second hand smoke. In some cases this can be lethal.
Tax breaks or exemptions for those working in pharmacy, health insurance and pharmaceutical industries could help bolster support for a national pharmacare plan. (Shutterstock)

Tax breaks could soften the blow of pharmacare plan

Two community pharmacists suggest a way for improving the palatability of evidence-based universal pharmacare -- for those working in health insurance, pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry.
The benefits of beans, lentils and other pulses go beyond the belly. (Shutterstock)

Benefits of pulses: Good for you and the planet

Today’s production of more, better food from the same amount land means that tomorrow’s population may not go hungry.
Vegetable prices are on the rise. How can Canadians cope? Scott Warman/Unsplash

Budget-friendly ways to get your veggie fix

Canada’s Food Price Report, recently published by Dalhousie University and the University of Guelph, predicts significant price hikes for vegetables this year.
Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor, right, and nutritionist Jessica Cole look over samples of some of the food groups at the unveiling of Canada’s new Food Guide, January 22, 2019 in Montréal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

New food guide fails on culture and sustainability

Canada's Food Guide is a political document. It does not represent those who are poor, culturally marginalized and most at risk for food insecurity.
Currently only half of people with depression access potentially adequate treatment, according to one research study. Digital devices could help. (Unsplash/boudewijn huysmans)

The future of psychiatry promises to be digital

Using smartphones and wearable devices to identify mental health symptoms and deliver psychotherapy will allow more people to access quality care, according to one psychiatrist.
Research shows we all hold negative stereotypes; once we accept this, we can start to making positive change. Shutterstock

Stop blaming ourselves for stigmatizing mental health

Awareness campaigns can only go so far to stopping the stigmatization of mental health. Change occurs once we stop shaming ourselves and others for our bias.
Various vegetables are on display at the Jean Talon Market in Montreal as the new Canada Food Guide was unveiled. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

In defence of Canada’s Food Guide

Canada's Food Guide makes nutrition recommendations. But the revamped guide does much more. It directs us to consider the broader set of circumstances —the social determinants —of how we eat.
If you engage in cognitively stimulating activities in midlife, such as reading and playing games, you can reduce dementia risk by about 26 per cent, according to research. (Unsplash/Rawpixel)

How to reduce your risks of dementia

Research is revealing many ways in which we can reduce our dementia risks -- from eating a Mediterranean diet and exercising, to playing games and studying for degrees.
Venezuelan citizens rest after they arrive in La Parada, on the outskirts of Cucuta, Colombia, on the border with Venezuela, Feb. 5, 2019. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

Venezuela: Denial of food is a human rights crime

Food shortages in Venezuela are a result of draconian government policies and should be declared an international crime against humanity.
New England Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman (11) and Los Angeles Chargers linebacker Uchenna Nwosu (42) collide during an NFL divisional playoff football game, Jan. 13, 2019, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Why you don’t need an MRI to detect concussion

A standard clinical MRI is not sensitive to the distributed and microscopic injuries in a concussed brain. But new discoveries are in the pipeline.
Using databases and community partnerships, we can end TB in Canada. (Shutterstock)

Fighting TB: Databases are powerful weapons

In Manitoba, Canada, researchers have used health databases to better understand how people with tuberculosis interact with the health-care system.
In 2017, Saskatchewan’s auditor general showed that a private pay MRI program actually increased wait times for scans rather than the promised reduction. Here, an MRI machine is prepared at Toronto’s Sunnybrook Hospital on May 1, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Why private health care is a terrible idea

A two-tier, for-profit health-care system will not end "hallway medicine" in Ontario or elsewhere; evidence from around the world shows that private payment increases wait times for the majority.
For women who work in education, the risks of workplace violence are especially high. New research shows rates of assaults have more than doubled between 2002 and 2015. (Shutterstock)

Women experience more workplace sex assault

Violence-related injuries at work are on the rise in Canada. New research shows that it is women who suffer the most and especially those working in education.
Women in Mexico City carry a banner reading “Legal and safe abortion across Mexico” during the commemoration of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women (November 25, 2018). Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP

Is the future of abortion online?

While the abortion debate continues worldwide, even in countries where it has long been legal, new drugs and telemedicine services could provide access to safe abortion beyond borders and laws.

How we are different

10 reasons

Most Read past week

  1. Young people drowning in a rising tide of perfectionism
  2. Too much screen time linked to an epidemic of myopia among young people
  3. Back pain? A physiotherapist may offer the most effective treatment, if you can afford it
  4. Women’s heart attack symptoms are different, and clinical care must catch up
  5. How Canadians are buying cannabis and getting high now that it’s legal

Pitch an idea

Got a news tip or article idea for The Conversation?

Tell us

Our Audience

The Conversation has a monthly audience of 10.7 million users, and reach of 38.2 million through Creative Commons republication.

Want to Write?

Write an article and join a growing community of more than 79,800 academics and researchers from 2,728 institutions.

Register now