Canada’s Andi Naude, who came into the Olympics ranked No. 2 in the world in women’s mogul skiing, reacts after failing to complete her final run at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

How Olympians can deal with failure

Do not be derailed by news reports that exercise is bad for the heart. Taking more exercise is a New Year’s resolution to stick to. Exercise reduces risks of depression, cancers, heart disease, stroke and sudden death. (Shutterstock)

Heart month

Exercise more – it really is good for your heart

The presence of sidewalks, green space, healthy food outlets, and trustworthy neighbours can all play a part in minimizing your risks of heart disease. (Shutterstock)

Heart month

How your community impacts heart health

Former governor general David Johnston invests Toronto scientist Janet Rossant as a Companion of the Order of Canada during a ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa in 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Canada’s unsung female heroes of life sciences

Canada's female scientists are superstars in their fields yet most Canadians have never heard of them. On International Day for Women in Science, it's time to give them the recognition they deserve.
Biological age calculators are a crude measurement but can be a wake-up call to improve our lifestyle. Lorene Farrugia

Your ‘biological age’ and how it impacts health

Four in five of us have a "biological" age older than our real age, which means we have at least one risk factor that is higher than the number set as “normal”.
While cervical screening has saved countless lives, we overscreen in Canada. Women don’t need to be screened until the age of 25 for cervical cancer. (Shutterstock)

The truth about cervical screening

Medical research suggests cervical cancer screening for women under the age of 25 has little impact. Women should therefore be screened at a later age, and less often.
Health Canada is proposing a new system to fast-track urgent drugs for children, the elderly and those with serious or life-threatening conditions. This would rely on decisions made by regulators in other jurisdictions. (Shutterstock)

Relying on foreign assessment of new drugs

Health Canada is proposing to allow some prescription drugs into the country with only 'cursory clinical review.' Here's why we should be worried.
A man smokes an electronic cigarette in Chicago in this 2014 photo. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

E-cigarettes need global regulations

The e-cigarette industry emerged as an alternative to traditional tobacco, but now it's dominated by Big Tobacco. That's why transnational regulations are needed for the industry.
Can three companies from outside the industry improve health care for their employees and lower costs? Reuters/Mike Blake

Amazon a disrupter of U.S. health-care system

Three business giants, Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase, announced plans to change health care delivery and insurance as we know it. Here's why that could be a major disruption.
Millennial women are choosing pets over kids. And they want to bring those pets to work. What can employers do? (Shutterstock)

The growing demand for pet-friendly workplaces

Pets have become a major part of our lives, with many millennials opting for a dog or cat instead of children. What should employers do to accommodate pet owners?
Asylum seekers from Haiti leave Olympic Stadium in August, 2017 in Montreal.The stadium is being used as temporary housing to deal with the influx of asylum seekers arriving from the United States. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz)

Let’s Talk: Helping young immigrant men

Talking about mental health challenges is not always so easy for young immigrant and refugee men in Canada, according to research from the University of British Columbia.
A one-size-fits-all approach to mental health does not speak to the diversity of Canada’s immigrant population. Here a man participates in a mass meditation on the lawn of Parliament Hill in Ottawa, in September 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

Let’s Talk: Culturally sensitive approaches to depression

As Bell Let's Talk Day approaches, we profile mental health experts practicing culturally sensitive treatments for depression and anxiety among Canada's immigrant, refugee and Indigenous communities.
Will offices, construction sites and medical clinics be full of stoned workers after Canada’s promised marijuana legalization date of July 2018? (Shutterstock)

Weed and your health and safety at work

Will offices, construction sites and medical clinics become less safe after marijuana legalization in Canada this summer? Our experts review the evidence, or lack of it.
A Syrian child drew a picture of helicopters dropping bombs and children dying as a result. The surviving children are crying, while the deceased ones have smiles on their faces. Zaher Sahloud

Mental health of young Syrians affects us all

Syrian refugee children are not getting the care they need in the wake of the trauma they have endured. Here's why that's bad for them and bad for the rest of the world.
Will blue packets replace pink ones soon? Aleksandra Berzhets/Shutterstock.com

A promising male birth control pill

Medicinal chemists are tweaking a natural molecule that can be a deadly poison – a modified version might work as a nonhormonal male contraceptive.

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