A study published in the British Medical Journal Open reports that midwifery patients were 41 per cent less likely to have a small-for-gestational-age baby compared to patients of obstetricians. (Shutterstock)

Midwives mean healthier babies

Concrete action steps are needed to help reconciliation, says a research team that offers 12 actionable ideas. Here Ben Paul, of the Musqueam First Nation, sings and plays a drum during the Walk for Reconciliation in Vancouver, B.C., on Sept. 24, 2017, held to promote positive relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

New guide kick-starts reconciliation

Industry representatives wear fitness trackers at the International Consumer Electronics Show in January 2014 in Las Vegas. Health and fitness information is being increasingly shared with insurance companies. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

Why life insurance firms want your Fitbit data

There is a growing research literature suggesting psychedelics hold incredible promise for treating mental health ailments ranging from depression and anxiety to PTSD. (Shutterstock)

Opening up the future of psychedelic science

To know the real promise of psychedelic substances like LSD, mushrooms and MDMA, researchers must embrace the principles and practise of 'open science.'
Physical violence in dating relationships has decreased over the past decade among youth, but boys are still reporting higher rates of dating violence, according to a recent study. (Shutterstock)

More boys hurt by dating violence than girls

Surprisingly, a study of more than 35,000 Canadian adolescents shows that boys report higher rates of dating victimization than girls.
Sirley Silveira Paixao, an immigrant from Brazil seeking asylum, kisses her 10-year-old son Diego Magalhaes, after he is released from immigration detention in Chicago on July 5, 2018. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

Drugging children: A chemical straitjacket

Psychotropic medication is 'pharmaceutical violence' against migrant children and other incarcerated youth throughout the United States. Drug addiction is one consequence.
In this April 14, 1947 file photo, a long line winds toward the entrance to Morrisania Hospital in the Bronx borough of New York, where doctors were vaccinating against smallpox. In an attempt to halt the spread of the disease, officials said city residents were being vaccinated at the rate of eight a minute. (AP Photo/File)

The elimination of smallpox: An example of collaboration

Humans have shown that together we can overcome daunting problems, including deadly pathogens like smallpox. It is a lesson of international cooperation and respect that we should pay attention to.
Sex-ed can equip and empower young people to make healthy and safe choices about their sexuality for themselves and for others. Simeon Jacobson/Unsplash

Sex-ed is crucial to the rights of children

The notion that religious groups are opposed to sex-ed is simply not true. And our youth need it more than ever to take control over their lives, their bodies and their decisions.
Even the most humanely designed prisons have negative effects on the people living and working inside. (Shutterstock)

What a discredited prison experiment got right

A wealth of research suggests prisons have serious detrimental effects on prisoners and prison workers.
An Ottawa high school student looks at plain cigarette packaging examples on World No Tobacco Day in May 2016. Tobacco companies are railing against Ottawa’s plans for plain cigarette packaging in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Big Tobacco’s bogus fight against plain packaging

The Canadian government is currently drafting regulations on plain packaging for cigarettes. Tobacco companies are trying to weaken the regulations via lobbying and misleading PR campaigns.
Jarryd Roughead was successfully treated with immunotherapy for melanoma. BRENDON THORNE/AAP

How two 1990s discoveries led to a Nobel Prize

In a remarkably short period of time, drugs that harness the power of the immune system, have been used to successfully treat many cancers.
It is estimated that 1.2 million children in Canada live in low income households and 10 per cent of families with children under the age of six report some degree of food insecurity. This places kids at increased risk of developmental vulnerability. (Shutterstock)

Why Canada needs a ‘Children’s Charter’

From food insecurity to cyberbullying and teenage suicide, Canada scores low on child health.
A resident of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation is photographed while speaking about water and access issues in her community in February 2015. The Shoal Lake community, despite supplying water to the city of Winnipeg, has long been under a boil-water advisory and is only just getting year-round road access. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

How Canada fails its citizens

Governments in Canada are routinely enacting public policies that primarily benefit economic elites, raising questions about government legitimacy and competency. Who's looking out for us?
Facebook moderators sift through hundreds of examples of distressing content during their shifts. Shutterstock

Content moderators: Mental health at risk

The news that a former moderator is suing Facebook over unsafe work practices suggests it's time we finally took the mental health of moderators seriously.
Researchers have raised concerns about anti-fungal resistance. Shutterstock

Taking fungal infections more seriously

Fungal diseases can be life-threatening for people living with HIV, cancer patients and those admitted to hospital.
Women in Nepal are tapped for volunteer health work. Many take on the work out of a sense of duty, but also gain access to otherwise inaccessible opportunities. Here women are seen on a bus in Pokhara, Nepal. Terry Boynton/Unsplash

The shoddy treatment of women health-care volunteers

Women health-care volunteers in places like Nepal, Afghanistan and Ethiopia play a vital role in the health system, yet they are undervalued and undertrained.
Large scar after surgery on the abdomen young woman. OneSideProFoto/SHutterstock.com

Why older skin heals with less scarring

When kids get injured their skin heals fast, but usually with nasty-looking scars. Now scientists studying the genes of old mice have figured out how they regenerate skin and block scars.
University of Florida scientists will be analyzing every cell in the pancreas, among other organs, to understand the roots of Type 1 diabetes. Magic mine/Shutterstock.com

Mapping the body’s 100 trillion cells

First, scientists wanted to decode all three billions units of the human genome. Now, a new effort will identify all the cell types in the human body to discover the roots of diseases, like diabetes.
More than 80 per cent of the plasma Canada now uses for medical purposes comes from paid donation in the United States. (Shutterstock)

Canadians should be paid for blood plasma donation

Canada suffers a shortage of vital blood plasma. Paying donors, through a non-profit like Canadian Blood Services, would secure a local supply without lining the pockets of corporate shareholders.

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