Google co-founder Sergey Brin arrives for the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences awards on Dec. 12, 2013, in Moffett Field, Calif. The Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences recognizes excellence in research aimed at curing intractable diseases and extending human life. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Could this be the year for a life science Breakthrough?

The province of Nova Scotia is leading the way in defining the terms of Canada’s ambiguous law on medically assisted dying. Here Liana Brittain is seen in Halifax in front of a projection of her late husband Paul B. Couvrette, who received a medically assisted death in P.E.I. on Sept. 15, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

Can we die? The seriously ill need clarity

Most mental illnesses begin before or during young adulthood, and a quarter of young Canadians have both a mood or anxiety disorder and a substance-abuse problem. (Shutterstock)

Mental illness on campus really is ‘a thing’

Today's students are at increasingly high risk for mental health diagnoses. Universities need to step up.
The railway at the centre of the 2013 Lac-Megantic explosion, Montreal Maine and Atlantic, was recently ordered to pay fines totalling $1.25 million after being convicted of violating the Fisheries Act due to crude oil leaking into nearby bodies of water. Employers and companies are increasingly being held responsible for workplace accidents. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

National Day of Mourning

A reminder: No one should die on the job

Every day people around the world go to work expecting to return home safely to their families. But the reality is that many never return due to workplace accidents that could have been prevented.
Production facility manager Derek Delahaye eats roasted crickets at the Entomo Farms cricket processing facility in Norwood, Ont., in 2016. Bugs are a diet staple in most parts of the world. Will Canadians join the masses in their search for alternate sources of protein to meat? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Thornhill

Less meat, more bugs in our dietary future

Canadians are increasingly looking to alternatives to meat to get their protein. Pulses like lentils and chickpeas are becoming more popular. Will insects find a way onto our plates too?
Taxing sugar places the burden on the poor – people who are already burdened by higher rates of heart disease, obesity and diabetes. (Shutterstock)

How sugar taxes punish the people

Sugar taxes fail to tackle the root of the problem -- the production and marketing of foods that cause chronic disease.
The elite women at the starting line of the 2017 Boston Marathon, a 26.2-mile distance competition. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm)

Boston Marathon: How ads target female runners

Women endurance runners are being celebrated in the advertising world yet the ads also create negative sentiments by focusing on 'ideal' running bodies - long, lean and masculine.
Some people experience cramps frequently after vigorous, high-intensity exercise. from shutterstock.com

Health check: Why do we get muscle cramps?

It's not just elite sportspeople who get muscle cramps. If you've ever experienced one, you'll know how painful they are. But why do we get them, and is there anything to be done?
Pasta has a low glycaemic index. Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash

Does pasta help you lose weight?

A recent study was reported to have found that eating pasta wouldn't make you put on weight, This is actually true, so long as you're following a low GI diet.
Up to 80 per cent of community care for older adults is provided by unpaid informal caregivers. In the absence of government supports, many of them struggle with exhaustion, stress and depression. (Shutterstock)

Stressed & exhausted caregivers need support

Informal caregivers contribute $25 million to the Canadian economy in unpaid labour, receiving virtually no financial support or emotional respite. More web-based interventions could help.
Canada has done a remarkable job of reducing lead in people’s bodies. But the experience of Flint, Mich. – where children were exposed to toxic levels of lead – teaches us to remain cautious. Here, Flint citizens watch testimonies before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, in Washington during 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Why we must stay vigilant about lead

Reduced lead exposure has made us smarter and healthier. Could changes in regulatory agencies across North America endanger this?
An obese Quebec man is seen in this photo. Canada is resisting U.S. attempts during NAFTA renegotiations to stop it from putting labels on processed foods to warn of their health risks. (Shutterstock)

How NAFTA could make us fat

The U.S. is vehemently opposed to Canada's intention to put labels on unhealthy processed foods. Here's why Canada should continue to stand its ground during NAFTA renegotiations.

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