Morningstar Mercredi, pictured on November 16, 2018, woke up from a surgery at 14 and discovered her developing baby was gone. What remained was an incision from her panty line to her belly button, cut without her permission. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Canada’s shameful history of sterilizing Indigenous women

Honduran migrant Elizabeth Umanzor hugs her six-year-old daughter Gina outside the tent where their family of five is sleeping at an sports complex sheltering more than 5,000 Central American migrants in Tijuana, Mexico, Nov. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Developing mental health care that refugees need

The growing trend of sexualised injection meth use — colloquially referred to as ‘slamming’ — is a growing public health concern due to the dual risk of transmission of HIV and other blood-borne viruses via both injection and sexual transmission. (Shutterstock)

Gay men who use meth need integrated care

Addressing Canada’s health inequities through the health-care system will only take us so far. Real change will require listening to Indigenous stories, which teach about our relationships to one another as human beings, and between us and our four-legged, winged, finned, rooted and non-rooted relations. (Unsplash/jongsun lee)

Indigenous knowledge for health equity

To improve Indigenous health in Canada we need more Indigenous health professionals and more culturally competent health-care providers. We also need to listen properly to Indigenous stories.
This Nov. 14, 2018 photo shows six women who have filed a lawsuit against Dartmouth College in New Hampshire for allegedly allowing three professors to create a culture in their department that encouraged drunken parties and subjected female graduate students to harassment, groping and sexual assault. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

We need to learn from the men who rape

It's time to stop surveying women about their experiences as rape victims, time to research the men who perpetrate these crimes and work to inebriate and isolate women.
New research indicates women are much happier when they work with other women, as opposed to men. Here a scene from the set of ‘Ocean’s Eight’ with Cate Blanchett and Rihanna looking happy working together.

Women feel better if they work with other women

Men have defended gender segregation by treating women who cross over into male-dominated occupations with scorn and ridicule.
People living with HIV/AIDS all over the world are still struggling with stigma due to perceptions of the virus as dark and shameful. Here a Filipino man lights candles at a World AIDS Day even in Quezon city, Philippines in 2016. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

World AIDS Day

What you need to know about HIV/AIDS today

Researchers from the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS share the latest research on HIV prevention, treatment and stigma.
There already exist some promising new antibiotic therapies, and more are in the pipeline. However, our economic model prevents researchers from moving them out onto the market. (Shutterstock)

The dire threat of antibiotic resistance

The end of effective antibiotics will be frightening. Life expectancy will fall dramatically and people of all ages will die from illnesses that we are used to treating with $10 worth of pills.
At least 54 countries prohibit the corporal punishment of children. Canada has neither prohibited corporal punishment, nor said it will. Shutterstock

Ending the physical punishment of kids

Until Canadians challenge the normalization of violence against children, we will continue to support, or at least tacitly condone, something that by all accounts is harmful.
Dementia patients are often the perpetrators and often the victims of abuse. Research also shows that a medical history of head injury can more than double the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in some populations, even after many years. (Shutterstock)

Dementia’s hidden darkness

From aggressive patients with Alzheimer's to frustrated caregivers, dementia is increasingly entwined with violence in private homes and residential facilities.
Clinical research has established exercise as a safe and effective intervention to counteract the adverse physical and psychological effects of cancer and its treatment. The Clinical Oncology Society of Australia is the first to recommend exercise as part of regular cancer care. (Unsplash/curtis macnewton)

Why doctors are starting to prescribe exercise

From weekend walks with your doctor to free gym memberships, there is a global movement afoot.
Getting enough physical activity can be challenging for women and girls, because they have to negotiate complex gender roles, stereotypes and cultural narratives about the body. (Shutterstock)

Girls and women need more time in nature

Women and adolescent girls say that being outdoors in nature offers opportunities to gain confidence in physical activity.
The Family Medicine Forum, Nov. 9, 2017, the Palais des congrès de Montréal. (Twitter/@FamilyMedForum)

Family doctors are overdosing on industry sponsorship

This week's annual Family Medicine Forum is an opportunity for your family doctor -- to cave or resist in the face of Big Pharma sponsorship and marketing.
The surgical removal of wisdom teeth is far more common than the problems they cause. (Pixabay)

Bad molars? The origins of wisdom teeth

When they cause problems, wisdom teeth don't seem very smart. But they may have been evolution's answer to a coarse diet.
Canadian orthoodontists were able to sell braces and other orthodental procedures by promising patients better lives with better teeth. (Shutterstock)

How did orthodontists sell orthodontics?

Why do Canadians have such straight white teeth? The story is in the marketing of orthodontics in Canada.
Perfectionists are rarely satisfied with their performance or appearance and engage in harsh self-criticism when their efforts fall short. Perfectionists are also more likely to develop the eating disorder bulimia nervosa, according to new research. (Shutterstock)

Research: Perfectionists more likely to be bulimic

Perfectionists have a higher chance of developing bulimia nervosa. Rather than treating symptoms of binge eating and vomiting, therapists should address this underlying personality trait.
A and B sample bottles from a human urine doping test. The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has set off a controversy by allowing Russia to test its own athletes. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

Concerns about lifting Russia’s doping ban

The decision by the World Anti-Doping Agency to lift its ban on Russia's drug testing has set off another controversy about whether there will ever be a level playing field in the world of sports.
A new short drug treatment for tuberculosis, called BPaMZ, is showing promise in trials. (The National Center for Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (Georgia) on behalf of TB Alliance)

To eliminate TB we need imagination and ambition

We cannot end TB with century-old technologies and poor quality care. It is time to reinvent the way we are managing TB, and overcome our collective failures of the imagination.
Feeling secure? Tania Kolinko/Shutterstock

What’s your attachment style?

Knowing what your attachment style is can help you navigate life's ups and downs a bit better.
Men of U.S. 64th Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, celebrate the news of the Armistice, November 11, 1918.

Therapeutic writing helped heal a nation

Writers like Virginia Woolf, Arthur Conan Doyle and J.M. Barrie suffered personal loss during the First World War. Their grief and insight helped readers with their own post-war collective grief.
The Family Medicine Forum, Nov. 9, 2017, the Palais des congrès de Montréal. (Twitter/@FamilyMedForum)

Doctors overdosing on industry sponsorship

This week's annual Family Medicine Forum is an opportunity for your family doctor -- to cave or resist in the face of Big Pharma sponsorship and marketing.

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