New research shows that more and more of our public conversation is unfolding within a dwindling coterie of sites that are controlled by a small few, largely unregulated and geared primarily to profit rather than public interest. Unsplash

Big Fail: The internet hasn’t helped democracy

In this Oct. 27, 2017 photo, actress Rose McGowan, left, waves after being introduced by Tarana Burke, right, founder of the #MeToo movement, at the inaugural Women’s Convention in Detroit. Are men any more likely to confess to sexual assault since #MeToo? (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Confessions to sexual assault are rare: #ItWasMe

Activists protest in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018. A Supreme Court with a new conservative majority takes the bench as Brett Kavanaugh, narrowly confirmed after a bitter Senate battle, joins his new colleagues to hear his first arguments as a justice. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Don’t define masculinity by Kavanaugh hearings

Concrete action steps are needed to help reconciliation, says a research team that offers 12 actionable ideas. Here Ben Paul, of the Musqueam First Nation, sings and plays a drum during the Walk for Reconciliation in Vancouver, B.C., on Sept. 24, 2017, held to promote positive relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Looking for reconciliation in the justice system

Many teenagers have stopped using Facebook and have gravitated instead to image-sharing platforms like Instagram. (Alex Iby/Unsplash)

The social implications of teens leaving Facebook

Teens – especially wealthier ones – are walking away from Facebook, towards picture-centric social media.
Behind the rose-coloured tales of well-matched couples falling deeply in love, Austen’s novels vigorously critique the patriarchal structures of her day. Shutterstock

Jane Austen: Fairy tales meet feminist critiques

Though she created her stories more than 200 years ago, Jane Austen's novels were forerunners of feminism.
A promotional photo for the release of Skygge’s first album ‘Hello World.’ Jean Francois Robert

AI’s first pop album ushers in a new era

AI and human musical collaborations have been around since the 60s, but for the first time, we are hearing AI "pop" music: can AI actually create creative and emotionally engaging music?
Mariam Magsi, Jahez/ Dowry (2018) Mariam Magsi/(mus)interpreted

Art show takes on Muslim misrepresentation

A visual art exhibit challenges inaccurate stereotypes of young Muslim women and instead presents complex and strong portraits.
A street art mural representing the innovative scientist Marie Curie, by French graffiti mural artist C215 (Christian Guemy) in Vitry-sur-Seine, France, on 24 Dec 2015. (Shutterstock)

True innovation generates ideas, not wealth

To become a successful innovator, follow Marie Curie, Mahatma Gandhi and today's female social entrepreneurs -- focus on ideas and social value, not money.
Barbershop Talks creates a place for Black men and boys to meet and discuss ideas about masculinity. Edgar Chaparro/Unsplash

Barbershop Talks about Black masculinity

Barbershop Talks use the idea of the "barbershop around the corner" as a place to meet and discuss ideas and create a safe space for Black men and boys to talk openly about masculinity.
Activists demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court to protest the confirmation vote of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Kavanaugh hearings: A show trial gone bad

The bitterly contested hearings to confirm Brett Kavanaugh as the newest justice to the U.S. Supreme Court were more of a show trial than a legal procedure.
Teens are questioning the suggestion that they can’t get their stories straight and that abusive behaviour is to be expected at their age. Here teens from the 1980s pose for a time capsule. Vintage Everyday

Being young does not let you off the hook

Last week's hearing with Brett Kavanaugh raised questions about how responsible we are for our youthful actions. A legal scholar says that youthful inexperience doesn’t let us off the hook.
A line of protesters against the construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline on the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota head to a unity rally on the west steps of the State Capitol in September 2016 in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Protecting heritage is a human right

Development projects are claiming ancestral sites at alarming rates. This ineffective protection of Indigenous heritage is a violation of human rights.
Even the most humanely designed prisons have negative effects on the people living and working inside. (Shutterstock)

What a discredited prison experiment got right

A wealth of research suggests prisons have serious detrimental effects on prisoners and prison workers.
A resident of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation is photographed while speaking about water and access issues in her community in February 2015. The Shoal Lake community, despite supplying water to the city of Winnipeg, has long been under a boil-water advisory and is only just getting year-round road access. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

How we fail our citizens in Canada

Governments in Canada are routinely enacting public policies that primarily benefit economic elites, raising questions about government legitimacy and competency. Who's looking out for us?
Participants in the March for Science, marching on Constitution Ave. in Washington, D.C. in April 2017 after listening to speakers at Washington Monument on a rainy Saturday Earth Day. Shutterstock

The end of scientific thinking: Trump, Ford & Peterson

Rationality is the newest casualty of populist philosophy.
In this April 14, 1947 file photo, a long line winds toward the entrance to Morrisania Hospital in the Bronx borough of New York, where doctors were vaccinating against smallpox. In an attempt to halt the spread of the disease, officials said city residents were being vaccinated at the rate of eight a minute. (AP Photo/File)

Working together to solve deadly problems

Humans have shown that together we can overcome daunting problems, including deadly pathogens like smallpox. It is a lesson of international cooperation and respect that we should pay attention to.
Sex-ed can equip and empower young people to make healthy and safe choices about their sexuality for themselves and for others. Simeon Jacobson/Unsplash

Sex-ed is crucial to the rights of children

The notion that religious groups are opposed to sex-ed is simply not true. And our youth need it more than ever to take control over their lives, their bodies and their decisions.
Women in Nepal are tapped for volunteer health work. Many take on the work out of a sense of duty, but also gain access to otherwise inaccessible opportunities. Here women are seen on a bus in Pokhara, Nepal. Terry Boynton/Unsplash

Women health-care volunteers have no upward mobility

Women health-care volunteers in places like Nepal, Afghanistan and Ethiopia play a vital role in the health system, yet they are undervalued and undertrained.
Innovative queer pop-ups challenge arguments about the death and demise of queer spaces in the city. Here an image from 2069 Sci-fi Kiki Vogue Ball of the Future presented in collaboration with Ricecake, Vancouver. John Bello/Facebook

Queer pop-ups take us beyond the gaybourhood

Rapacious gentrification in Vancouver is part of the story and struggle for queer residents but queer pop-ups offer some respite.
Anita Hill, who accused U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment, amid heavy security when she was to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Oct. 10, 1991. AP Photo/Doug Mills

Things have changed since Anita Hill – sort of

Anita Hill charged in 1991 that Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her. He was still confirmed. Now, another nominee faces sexual assault allegations. Have times changed?
Serena Williams looks at her box during the women’s final of the U.S. Open tennis tournament against Naomi Osaka, of Japan on Sept. 8, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Serena Williams caricature is infuriating

Serena Williams challenged decades of stereotypes when she revealed her anger after she disagreed with a U.S. Open umpire. A racist caricature and calls to boycott her playing by umpires followed.
Students at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ont., participate in protests against the appearance at the school of Faith Goldy, a white nationalist, in March 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Hannah Yoon

Protecting free speech on campus: A solution in search of a problem

The Ford government in Ontario is taking aim at free speech on the province's campuses. But is it addressing a problem that doesn't exist?

Quote of the Day

...the TRC report with its 94 Calls to Action was initially greeted with stunning silence. Michelle Stewart Associate Professor of Justice Studies, University of Regina

Editor's picks

How we are different

10 reasons

Most Read past week

  1. Melania Trump’s pith helmet is not just a hat
  2. Time and money – the biggest hurdles to healthy eating
  3. AI’s first pop album ushers in a new musical era
  4. In the end, it was Khashoggi’s ‘friends’ who silenced him
  5. In Jane Austen, fairy tales meet biting feminist critiques

Pitch an idea

Got a news tip or article idea for The Conversation?

Tell us

Our Audience

The Conversation has a monthly audience of 10.7 million users, and reach of 38.2 million through Creative Commons republication.

Want to Write?

Write an article and join a growing community of more than 74,100 academics and researchers from 2,566 institutions.

Register now