The decision by the city of Victoria to take down a statue of John A. Macdonald has renewed debate about how historical figures should be remembered. This photo from 2015, taken at Wilfrid Laurier University, shows people protesting Macdonald’s treatment of Métis and First Nations during his time as Canada’s first prime minister. Denia Anderson

John A. Macdonald should not be forgotten, nor celebrated

To help with the rebuilding of Syria, we need to curb the rising tide of xenophobia online. Syrian refugees get ready to cross back into war-torn Syria from the eastern Lebanese border town of Arsal, June 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

Syrian refugees — the need for an image reboot

Rwandan students on grounds of the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village near Rwamagana, in Rwanda., 2014. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Silence can be healing for Rwandans born of rape

Is it always good to talk about violent pasts? Sixty Rwandan youths participated in a research project that aimed to understand the perspectives of people born of rapes committed during the genocide
Look both ways! Public education was the only thing policy makers did to help the rising number of pedestrians killed by cars. Staged image from Ontario Safety League 1923 safety campaign. City of Toronto Archives

Death by street – Toronto’s automobiles

Torontonians have been experiencing pedestrian and bicyclist fatalities since the advent of the automobile. The one way to stop the deaths is to ban cars but since that won't happen, what can be done?
Density is an idea sold to us by corporate developers who want to build on every last bit of green space. To fully enjoy our city now and for the future, we need more public green space.

Toronto needs more beauty in its waterfront

As Toronto hurtles towards its population dense future, the making of significant green communities for its waterfront needs to be urgently considered.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford arrives for the buck-a-beer plan announcement at Barley Days brewery in Picton, Ont., on Aug. 7, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

Controlling intoxicants: Not worth repeating

Ontario Premier Doug Ford is loosening the province's liquor laws. Before dismantling a system, it's a good idea to know why it was established in the first place.
Is it ethical to eat meat? Ewan Munro

What philosophers have to say about eating meat

The coworking company, WeWork, has banned meat, citing an attempt to reduce its carbon footprint. For centuries, philosophers have made a moral case against meat-eating.
Michelle Duster holding a portrait of her great-grandmother, Ida B. Wells. AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast

Ida B. Wells: The role of grassroots support

My great-grandmother, an early civil rights champion, path-breaking journalist and suffrage leader, was among the most influential women of her time.
PrEP is effective as a protection against HIV – though condoms can still be used to prevent STDs. Why can’t we celebrate the idea that men can have sex without fear of death? (Shutterstock)

Gay men: Finally, sex without fear

Recently PrEP, an effective drug against HIV, was in the news with some concerns that gay men are no longer using condoms. But is the issue about condoms or control?
Sandra Oh, a U.S./Canadian actress of Korean descent, is an outspoken advocate for greater representation in film and television. She is the first woman of Asian decent to be nominated for an Emmy. Here, just before being inducted into Canada’s Walk of Fame in Toronto, 2011. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim

Thank you, Sandra Oh – a first for the Emmys

Sandra Oh's recent Emmy nomination for 'Killing Eve' is a sign of appreciation of her work but also a symbol of hope for the author as a former actor and as an academic.
U.S. President Donald Trump greets supporters in Iowa in July 2018. Why do so many people still support Trump amid a slew of scandals and demonstrably false statements? (Eileen Meslar/Telegraph Herald via AP)

Why many Americans still believe in Trump

Experts wonder why Donald Trump remains so popular despite his eyebrow-raising statements. The answer may lie in the way he tells stories.
Underneath the façade of the Caribbean carnival, historical, cultural and political undercurrents run deep. A parade participant performs during the Grand Parade at last year’s Toronto’s Carnival. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

Joyous resistance through costume and dance at Carnival

The Toronto Caribbean Carnival reclaims alternative ideals of beauty while building community in Toronto.
Ephraim Escudero’s child holds a photo near by his memorial. The father of two was murdered in the brutal drug war of Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte. Sheerah Escudero

The brutal personal costs of the Philippines’ human rights abuses

From the war on drugs to a crackdown on human rights and environmental activists, life for Filipinos is increasingly nightmarish.
Police at the scene of a shooting in Toronto’s Greektown on July 23, 2018. The parents of Faisal Hussain, whose shooting spree left two people dead and 13 injured, say their son had struggled all his life with psychosis and depression, but none of the medications or therapies he tried were able to overcome his mental illness. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

Toronto shooting

Social media can be information poison

Social media abhors informational vacuums and speed eclipses accuracy. That allows pseudo-experts, agitators and even liars to circulate rumours and poisonous information when big news breaks.
Does your morality come from your religion? Not really. Trafalgar Square (Stop B), London, United Kingdom. Malcolm Lightbody/Unsplash

Religion does not determine your morality

Many believe their morality comes from their religion. But evidence suggests that people’s opinion of what God thinks is actually what they believe is right and wrong, not the other way around.
The formula industry has responded to the decline in sales to white women at home by ramping up its marketing to Black and brown women overseas. (Shutterstock)

U.S. support of formula is a race issue

American support of the formula industry comes at the cost of the health and lives of Black and brown babies, at home and abroad.
President Donald Trump delivers a lot of information through Twitter. Here he speaks in the Oval Office of the White House, March 2018. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The math behind Trump’s tweets

Networks of keywords are analyzed in Donald Trump's tweets from 2015 to the present.
Gin Lane, a scene of urban desolation with gin-crazed Londoners; a woman lets her child fall to its death and an emaciated ballad-seller. William Hogarth

America looks hopeless – like the ‘mother country’

When the U.S. broke away from the "mother country," the dream was to let the common good overruled selfish and private interests. Yet the federal government is arranged so this can never occur.

Quote of the Day

For many Canadians, there is a fear that removing statues or changing names of buildings will erase the country’s history. Others charge that we cannot judge a historical person’s actions based on contemporary standards. Robert Alexander Innes Associate Professor, Department of Indigenous Studies, University of Saskatchewan

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