Eleanor Roosevelt, Chairman of Human Rights Commission, and Charles Malik, Chairman of the General Assembly’s Third Committee (second from right), during a press conference after the completion of the Declaration of Human Rights in December 1948. UN Photo

Seventy years of international human rights

Morningstar Mercredi, pictured on November 16, 2018, woke up from a surgery at 14 and discovered her developing baby was gone. What remained was an incision from her panty line to her belly button, cut without her permission. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Our shameful history of sterilizing Indigenous women

Residents stand near rescued Rohingya men after they were brought ashore by local fishermen in Kuala Idi, Aceh province, Indonesia on Dec. 4, 2018. A wooden boat carrying the hungry and weak Rohingya Muslims, forced to flee Myanmar and Bangladesh, was found adrift. (AP Photo/Iskandar Ishak)

Inaction as Genocide Convention turns 70

Ontario PC leadership candidate Tanya Granic Allen arrives to participate in a debate in Ottawa in February 2018. Granic Allen was supported by the Campaign Life Coalition (CLC), and the organization said it recruited more than 9,000 PC memberships in support of her campaign to became the premier of Ontario. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

The impact of the Christian right

A woman smokes a large joint in a Toronto park on Wednesday, October 17, 2018, as they mark the first day of legalization of cannabis across Canada. Lead Caption: Research shows that cannabis legalization is unlikely to either reduce criminal involvement or reduce availability to youth. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Why did Canada really legalize weed?

People gather at a memorial ceremony to honour the 13 students and one staff member killed at the École Polytechnique Massacre, Tuesday, December 6, 2016 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Less talk, more action: National Day of Remembrance

The day of remembrance and action, also called White Ribbon Day, marks the anniversary of the murders of 14 female engineering students killed in 1989 at l'École Polytechnique de Montréal.
Ahed Tamimi is in a courtroom at the Ofer military prison near Jerusalem, Feb. 13, 2018. The Israeli military judge overseeing the trial of Palestinian teenager Tamimi ordered all proceedings to take place behind closed doors. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

Revering some girl activists and not others

Why do we know the story of Malala, the Pakistani student who survived a brutal attack on her school by the Taliban but not the story of Ahed, a Palestinian girl who stood up to Israeli forces?
A tribute to those lost from the community, people march with We Will Not Rest #UntilWe'reSafe t-shirts during Toronto Pride parade on June 24, 2018. Many feel the recent killings in Toronto might have received more attention had the victims not been homosexuals or racialized men. The Canadian Press/Cole Burston

Gay Village killings expose tensions with police

The murder investigation of missing gay men in Toronto has raised questions of inequalities. A long view of police relationships with LGBTQ communities in Canada show that much progress has been made.
Indigenous youth planning on attending post-secondary education would benefit from appropriate financial literacy information. Here students Cheyenne Wilson, 13, Roy Joseph, 13, centre, and Connor Roberts, 13, after attending a presentation by B.C.‘s representative for Children and Youth at Shoreline Community School in Victoria, B.C., on May 15, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Financial empowerment for Indigenous youth

Indigenous entrepreneurship is growing at a rate six times faster than the general Canadian population and it is 10 years younger. Culturally relevant financial literacy is critical to its success.
MP Boissonnault attended World AIDS Day flag raising on Parliament Hill, Dec. 1 2017. Gov't of Canada/LGBTQ2 Secretariat

World AIDS Day

Let’s stop criminalizing HIV status

In Canada, people living with HIV can be charged with not disclosing their HIV status to their sexual partners. There is evidence that Black men suffer the most under this criminalization.
As AI is deployed in society, there is an impact that can be positive or negative. The future is in our hands. Shutterstock

The Montréal Declaration: Why we must develop AI responsibly

The Montréal Declaration calls for the responsible development of artificial intelligence. A world expert explains why scientists must choose how their expertise will benefit society.
In this Oct. 31, 2018 photo, students dance atop a bus to music during a Vote for Our Lives rally at the University of Central Florida in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

Pay attention to the power of youth

Young people have the right, the skills and the numbers to make a difference in politics and society in North America and beyond. Their voices, energy and vision contribute to a healthy democracy.
Like any employer, the Québec government has an obligation of reasonable accommodation when it comes to its employees. Shutterstock

Québec must accommodate its workers

As an employer, how will the Québec government's duty to reasonably accommodate the needs of its employees conflict with its plan to ban religious symbols among some civil servants?
We are not doing a good job of communicating climate change. People have diverging interpretations of how climate change fits into their own stories. (Unsplash)

Why we should stop labelling people climate change deniers

We must recognize the complexity of perspectives on climate change if we want to confront it.
‘Wait, we’re WHAT?’ Why laws that consider live-in couples to be married may be well-intentioned, but erode free choice and put pressure on relationships. Rawpixel/Unsplash

Why marriage default laws are misguided

Reforming laws relating to unmarried couples is long overdue. But it can also represent an affront couples’ autonomy and erodes the freedom to choose to live in non-marital situations.
Honduran migrant Elizabeth Umanzor hugs her six-year-old daughter Gina outside the tent where their family of five is sleeping at an sports complex sheltering more than 5,000 Central American migrants in Tijuana, Mexico, Nov. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Developing the mental health care refugees need

Research shows that when refugees arrive in Canada they find a health system that is ill-equipped to meet their complex social and psychological needs.
The Guelph Mercury office in Guelph, Ont., is seen in January 2016 after the final print edition of the newspaper was published. Ottawa has announced initiatives to support local journalism, including a measure to classify nonprofit news organizations as charities, making it easier for them to attract donations. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Hannah Yoon

Nonprofit news: Lessons from south of the border

Canada has a lot to learn from the U.S. about nonprofit news. Here's how nonprofit news organizations work in the United States. Spoiler alert: It's all about collaboration.
The coastline of Sulawesi, Indonesia, where languages and cultures are threatened by climate change. Anastasia Riehl

The impact of climate change on language loss

Approximately 7,000 languages are spoken in the world today, but only about half are expected to survive this century. One factor contributing to this loss is climate change.
In this October 2018, photo, candles lit by activists protesting the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi are placed outside Saudi Arabia’s Consulate in Istanbul. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

Canada’s moral negligence in Khashoggi murder

Ottawa's response to Jamal Khashoggi's murder doubles down on “human rights” rhetoric while failing to take action. It's a matter of the death of some in exchange for the livelihood of others.
Laurie Nickel and her daughter Stephanie hold a protest sign during a union meeting after General Motors announced it would be closing its plant in Oshawa, Ont., that employs 2,500 people. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Eduardo Lima

GM closures: Oshawa needs more than ‘thoughts and prayers’

General Motors has announced it's closing plants in Canada and the U.S. Many of the towns have built cars for decades or longer. A plant closing shatters people’s sense of belonging and identity.
Addressing Canada’s health inequities through the health-care system will only take us so far. Real change will require listening to Indigenous stories, which teach about our relationships to one another as human beings, and between us and our four-legged, winged, finned, rooted and non-rooted relations. (Unsplash/jongsun lee)

The solution to Canada’s health inequities

To improve Indigenous health in Canada we need more Indigenous health professionals and more culturally competent health-care providers. We also need to listen properly to Indigenous stories.
The ‘It’s okay to be white’ poster campaign, seen in the context of reacting to ‘Black Lives Matter,’ cannot be seen as benign. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The trouble with saying ‘it’s okay to be white’

Posters with the phrase "It's okay to be white" were found around the campus of the University of Manitoba. What does it really mean?
New research indicates women are much happier when they work with other women, as opposed to men. Here a scene from the set of ‘Ocean’s Eight’ with Cate Blanchett and Rihanna looking happy working together.

Women prefer working with other women

Men have defended gender segregation by treating women who cross over into male-dominated occupations with scorn and ridicule.

Quote of the Day

Meaning is never produced in a vacuum. Statements have historical and cultural contexts and ideology is embedded in the language we use. Matthew Flisfeder, Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and Communications, University of Winnipeg

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  1. Canada’s shameful history of sterilizing Indigenous women
  2. Why Tumblr’s ban on adult content is bad for LGBTQ youth
  3. Canada’s genocide: The case of the Ahiarmiut
  4. Why we should stop labelling people climate change deniers
  5. What’s the real reason the Canadian government legalized weed?

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