Social media has become a place of vitriolic myths about Indigenous peoples in the wake of the Gerald Stanley trial for the killing of Colten Boushie. Here, a vigil in support of Colten Boushie’s family on Feb. 13, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Social media full of vitriol since Stanley trial

People protest gun violence outside the White House on Feb. 19 following the latest mass school shooting, this one in Florida. Like the teens and children who showed up at the White House and elsewhere to protest, Americans must rediscover themselves as a revolutionary people who are not afraid to start over. (Shutterstock)

The historical roots of U.S. gun violence

Indigenous, LGBT, Black and refugee youth are among the groups that are at a greater risk of cyberbullying than others. But youth can also be powerful agents of change. Clarke Sanders/Unsplash

Don’t be a cyberbullying bystander

A team of researchers in northern Australia have documented kites and falcons, “firehawks,” intentionally carrying burning sticks to spread fire: It is just one example of western science catching up to Indigenous Traditional Knowledge. James Padolsey/Unsplash

Science catches up to Traditional Knowledge

Indigenous community members are doing the work to situate Colten Boushie’s life and death within the colonial context, answering not if race was a factor, but how and why. Colten Boushie’s brother, Jace Boushie, looks on during a media event at the Battlefords Agency Tribal Chiefs office after a jury delivered a verdict of not guilty in the trial of Gerald Stanley. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards

The colonialism of Canada’s media

In this 2005 photo, Rattan Singh Kalsi shows a photograph of his daughter, Indira, at a meeting with families of the victims of the 1985 Air India bombing. (CP PHOTO/Aaron Harris)

Canada’s indifference to the Air India bombing

When preparing for a course, a McMaster University professor found an alarming lack of knowledge among Canadians about the Air India bombing of 1985. Why the startling indifference from Canadians?
Olympic gold medallists Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada are artists on ice, but behind their performance is years of training to be mentally tough during competition. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

How Olympians train their brains to become mentally tough

For any athlete to deliver a gold medal performance, mental toughness is an essential ingredient. But what exactly is mental toughness — and how does an athlete develop it?
Colten Boushie’s uncle, Alvin Baptiste, and his brother Jace Boushie address demonstrators gathered outside of the courthouse in North Battleford, Sask.,on Feb.10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Matt Smith

‘Clearing the plains’ & the Stanley acquittal

It's time for an overhaul of the justice system in Canada: How juries are selected, how Indigenous victims are treated and to challenge embedded racism within police forces and courts.
The controversial opinions of University of Toronto professor Jordan Peterson have garnered interest around the world and have led to wide media exposure, including this interview with Britain’s Channel 4 News. Channel 4/YouTube

Jordan Peterson & the fake news era

Jordan Peterson is now a right-wing darling for his views on everything from transgender people, the #MeToo movement and political correctness on campus. But he's not saying anything new.
The release of Black Panther provides the opportunity to honour the many contributions of Black style to North American fashion. (Marvel)

Black Panther: Honouring the legacy of Black style

The hype around the costumes in the film Black Panther shows a need to recognize the legacy of Black style in mainstream fashion.
U.S. President Donald Trump points to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as he welcomes him to the White House in Washington, D.C. in October 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Merit-based immigration is no ‘magic bullet’

Canada's experience shows that selecting immigrants based on economic merit is not a silver bullet; finding the "right" immigrants is the only the first step.
Nathan Chen of the United States, considered a gold medal contender, falls while performing during the men’s short program figure skating at the 2018 Winter Olympics. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Why favourites fail: The Olympic ‘choke’

Why can an athlete dominate their sport, but fail to perform when it counts most at the Olympic Games? A number of factors the viewing audience can't see can explain poor performances.
Canada’s Andi Naude, who came into the Olympics ranked No. 2 in the world in women’s mogul skiing, reacts after failing to complete her final run at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Helping Olympians deal with failure

Failure is something all athletes need to deal with, especially when competing on the world stage that is the Olympics. Learning self-compassion can help athletes rebound from setbacks.
Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir lead Team Canada into the stadium during the Opening Ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-COC, Jason Ransom

What’s most important at the Olympics?

It would seem obvious athletes are the most important part of the Olympics. But competing issues, from sponsorship rules to politics, means the rights of athletes aren't always the top priority.
Miniature of the duke of true love and his companions entertaining ladies. The Book of the Queen, c. 1410–1414, France (Paris), Harley 4431, f. 145 (Creative Commons)

The magic of love and sex

A scholar of medieval magic discusses the hope in magical techniques for finding love.
Ron Eland, at far left, in Great Britain’s 1948 Olympic team. The stories of Eland and other black athletes must be told. Pic taken from Haliday, J. (1950). Olympic Weight-lifting with Body Building for all. London: Pullum & Sons

Narratives of South Africa’s Black athletes

Writing and rewriting black sporting history is a means of redressing exclusion.
Fireworks explode behind the Olympic flame during the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, (AP Photo/David J. Phillip,Pool)

How Olympic themes shape our differences

CBC and NBC's theme music that fills our ears before and after commercials and quietly accompanies intimate athlete profiles can actually have an impact on the way we view sports.
Reid Watts of Canada competes in the first round of the men’s luge at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

Do the Olympics still matter?

The Olympics have been plagued by doping, corruption and political problems. But academic and former Olympian Bruce Kidd says the Olympic Games are still an important humanitarian movement.
Amy Jacques Garvey with her husband, Marcus.

Black women’s political activism

Before the civil rights era, a group of powerful and resourceful black women laid the groundwork for a generation of black activists.
The stunning hoax of The Shed at Dulwich, deceived millions and showed how willing we are to consume an appetizing story. (Courtesy VICE /Theo McInnes)

Believe nothing: The hoax of the Shed at Dulwich

The Shed at Dulwich reached TripAdvisor's No. 1 spot for restaurants in London before it was revealed to be a hoax. The stunt showed how easily we are fooled. The lesson learned? Trust no one.
Research shows that Instagram photos tagged with #eatingdisorderrecovery tend to feature thin, young, white, women. They also show stylized versions of food, reflecting a certain class status and engagement with “foodie” cultures. (Shutterstock)

Eating disorder recovery on Instagram

Instagram can offer a supportive online community to people recovering from eating disorders. It can also reinforce stereotypes of eating disordered bodies.
Current IOC President Thomas Bach touches a monument to Olympic founder Pierre de Coubertin in ancient Olympia, southern Greece, in 2016. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

Would Olympic founder approve of the Games?

As the Olympics get underway, what would the man who founded the modern Olympic movement think? Pierre de Coubertin's vision of the Olympics as a tool of peace and faith in youth still resonates.
South Korea’s goalie Shin So-jung reacts after giving up a goal to Switzerland in the first game played by the combined Koreas women’s hockey team the 2018 Winter Olympics. Korea lost its opening game 8-0. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

Player or pawn? Women’s hockey at the Olympics

The joint South Korean-North Korean women's Olympic hockey team has angered fans of the game and raised concerns about athlete morale. But the media spotlight is actually good for the game.

Quote of the Day

The Stanley decision demonstrates yet again that not only are white farmers above the law, but young Indigenous men may well be below it...they cannot rely on the protection of settler law because it is not designed to protect them. David MacDonald Professor of Political Science, University of Guelph

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  4. Believe nothing: The hoax of the Shed at Dulwich
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