York University, Canada

York University champions new ways of thinking that drive teaching and research excellence. Our students receive the education they need to make an impact on the world. Meaningful and unexpected careers result from cross-disciplinary programming, innovative course design and diverse experiential learning opportunities. York students and graduates push limits, achieve goals and find solutions to the world’s most pressing social challenges, empowered by a strong community. York is an internationally recognized research university with 11 faculties and 25 research centres. Located in Toronto, York is the third largest university in Canada, with a strong community of 53,000 students, 7,000 faculty and administrative staff, and more than 300,000 alumni. York U’s fully bilingual Glendon Campus is home to Southern Ontario’s Centre of Excellence for French Language and Bilingual Postsecondary Education.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 70 articles

The new cannabis legislation in Canada does not give enough thought to those who were overly punished for cannabis-related activities. Jakob Owens/Unsplash

As cannabis is legalized, let’s remember amnesty

Now that cannabis is almost legal in Canada, many are celebrating. Before we forget, we should remember those that have been arrested for previous crimes and push for amnesty.
Hog farm buildings are inundated with floodwater from Hurricane Florence near Trenton, N.C., in September 2018. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Hurricanes, hog manure and the dire need for carbon pricing

Cheap fossil fuels contort the global economy in ways that have systematically harmed some and benefited others. Justice demands that those of us who have benefited take responsibility.
Suncor’s base plant with upgraders in the oil sands in Fort McMurray Alta., June 13, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson)

How post-truth politics is sinking debate on environmental assessment reform

Canada's proposed new environmental assessment law is facing heated, if not necessarily well-informed, opposition. The real question is whether it goes far enough.
Activists demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court to protest the confirmation vote of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Why the Kavanaugh hearings were a show trial gone bad

The bitterly contested hearings to confirm Brett Kavanaugh as the newest justice to the U.S. Supreme Court were more of a show trial than a legal procedure.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford returns to the provincial legislature during a midnight session to debate the bill that cut the size of Toronto city council from 47 representatives to 25 in September 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Toronto must keep fighting Doug Ford – for the good of democracy

City council is a level of government deserving of recognition and autonomy. That's why Toronto must continue to fight Ontario's attempt to exert its will over the city.
There is a growing research literature suggesting psychedelics hold incredible promise for treating mental health ailments ranging from depression and anxiety to PTSD. (Shutterstock)

Opening up the future of psychedelic science

To know the real promise of psychedelic substances like LSD, mushrooms and MDMA, researchers must embrace the principles and practise of 'open science.'
A resident of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation is photographed while speaking about water and access issues in her community in February 2015. The Shoal Lake community, despite supplying water to the city of Winnipeg, has long been under a boil-water advisory and is only just getting year-round road access. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

We fail our citizens in Canada – and the UN is onto us

Governments in Canada are routinely enacting public policies that primarily benefit economic elites, raising questions about government legitimacy and competency. Who's looking out for us?
People hold artwork of various marine life and youth during a rally celebrating a recent federal court ruling against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, in Vancouver, on Sept. 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

No quick or easy resolution to the Trans Mountain pipeline question

Contrary to what some have suggested, the uncertainty over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion will be drawn out.
A protester opposed to the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is lowered to a police boat after spending two days suspended from a bridge in Vancouver in July 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Lessons from Clayoquot Sound for the Trans Mountain pipeline protests

Based on the success of the Clayoquot Sound protests 25 years ago, we can expect the TransMountain pipeline expansion protest movement, and its related civil disobedience, to continue.
A man holds a sign at a memorial remembering the victims of the July 22, 2018 shooting in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mark Blinch

Toronto mass shooting: How the city is coping a month later

Toronto is still grappling with the fallout from two mass casualty events -- April's van attack and a mass shooting in July. A month after the shooting, how is Toronto moving forward?
Clothes are central to our personal identity and our dignity. Their condition reveals the care work that has gone into their selection and maintenance. (Shutterstock)

When choosing a nursing home, check the clothing and laundry

As the Wettlaufer inquiry wraps up for the summer, an international research team offers suggestions on how to make nursing homes as good as they can possibly be.
Small business owners provide a service by offering goods not found elsewhere and employing local community members. Here, a sari shop window in Toronto’s ‘India Bazaar.’ Ian Muttoo/https://www.flickr.com/photos/imuttoo/

Why immigrant Mom & Pop Shops are really social ventures

We may celebrate the contributions of newcomers of the past; however, we make the integration process difficult. Some immigrants turn to business to fill the gaps for themselves and their community.
Sandra Oh, a U.S./Canadian actress of Korean descent, is an outspoken advocate for greater representation in film and television. She is the first woman of Asian decent to be nominated for an Emmy. Here, just before being inducted into Canada’s Walk of Fame in Toronto, 2011. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim

Thank you, Sandra Oh – a first for the Emmys

Sandra Oh's recent Emmy nomination for 'Killing Eve' is a sign of appreciation of her work but also a symbol of hope for the author as a former actor and as an academic.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford announces his plan to keep the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station in operation until 2024, in this June 2018 photo. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)

Doug Ford’s energy shake-up could cost Ontario

Ontario Premier Doug Ford seems intent on dismantling the previous government's energy strategy. But that may not protect consumers.
Police at the scene of a shooting in Toronto’s Greektown on July 23, 2018. The parents of Faisal Hussain, whose shooting spree left two people dead and 13 injured, say their son had struggled all his life with psychosis and depression, but none of the medications or therapies he tried were able to overcome his mental illness. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

Social media can be information poison when we need facts most

Social media abhors informational vacuums and speed eclipses accuracy. That allows pseudo-experts, agitators and even liars to circulate rumours and poisonous information when big news breaks.
Mary Ng is hugged by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau after being sworn in as Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion during a swearing-in ceremony at Rideau Hall on July 18, 2018. The cabinet shuffle sets the stage for the next federal election in the fall of 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Trudeau’s cabinet shuffle patches holes before next election

With a federal election next year, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has shuffled his cabinet. What do the new faces in new jobs tell us about where the government feels it could be challenged?
The transformative nature of our move to a data-driven economy and society means that any data strategy will have long-lasting effects. That’s why the Canadian government needs to ask the right questions to the right people in its ongoing national consultations. (Shutterstock)

Why the public needs more say on data consultations

The Canadian government is right to hold public consultations on digital and data transformation given how profoundly it affects society at large. But the scope is far too narrow.
Children protest in Los Angeles outside a court hearing where immigrant-rights advocates asked a judge to order the release of parents separated from their children at the U.S.-Mexico border. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

I’ve seen the lasting emotional damage to detained children

U.S. President Donald Trump may believe he's contained the political damage of his policy to separate migrant children from their parents. But the psychological damage to children has only just begun.
Giving a TED talk and/or tweeting are becoming expected parts of an up-and-coming digital professor’s job. (William Saito)

The professor of the future: Digital and critical

Young professors are challenged to engage in public outreach using digital technologies, without becoming mouthpieces for corporate elites.

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