Hurricane season

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Analysis and Comment

Tornado seven miles south of Anadarko, Oklahoma, May 3, 1999. OAR/ERL/National Severe Storms Laboratory/Flickr

Understanding tornadoes: 5 questions answered

More tornadoes occur in the United States than in any other country, mainly in the Great Plains, the Midwest and southern states. Two meteorology professors explain what causes these dangerous storms.

Make our soil great again

To help feed a growing world population, restore biodiversity and slow climate change, a geologist calls for a moon shot effort to restore healthy soil around the world.

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Trump administration

The Flint water crisis was one of the few cases of environment-related social injustices that reached national attention in recent years. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Will we reverse the little progress we’ve made on environmental justice?

Addressing social and health inequalities from pollution is no longer a priority at the EPA. What did the Office of Environmental Justice do and what will happen if it's shut down?

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EPA

The bad old days: Public and political support for the EPA was highest when environmental problems like air and water pollution were more obvious than current problems like climate change or endocrine disruptors. U.S. National Archives

Why Trump’s EPA is far more vulnerable to attack than Reagan’s or Bush’s

Today's political climate gives new EPA head Scott Pruitt a clear path to seriously cut back EPA enforcement – more than previous administrations.

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Food security

Planting a diverse blend of crops and cover crops, and not tilling, helps promote soil health. Catherine Ulitsky, USDA/Flickr

Healthy soil is the real key to feeding the world

Conventional wisdom says we need industrial agriculture to feed the world. Not so, says geologist David Montgomery: Practices that focus on creating healthy soil can transform agriculture.

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Public lands

The Trump administration will review the status of The Bears Ears National Monument in Utah, one of the country’s most significant cultural sites. Bureau of Land Management

Trump’s plan to dismantle national monuments comes with steep cultural and ecological costs

Trump wants to scale back national monuments on federal lands in the name of boosting the economy. But this would undo decades of investments to manage our cultural and ecological resources.

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Research and Expert Database

Editors’ Picks

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  3. Are solar and wind really killing coal, nuclear and grid reliability?
  4. Healthy soil is the real key to feeding the world
  5. Getting ready for hurricane season: 6 essential reads

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