TV networks are trying to win back cord-cutters. 'Falling TV' via www.shutterstock.com

Television

Could Hulu and Google upend the TV industry in 2017?

Next year Hulu and Google will introduce their own bundled channel services. Will it spark an online TV revolution or simply lead to more of the same?
Once you start, you can’t stop. 'Injection' via www.shutterstock.com

Gender

Why are young women without wrinkles using Botox?

By getting young women hooked before they've even formed wrinkles, Botox peddlers have realized they can enlist them in a lifetime of treatment.
Even without iPhones, people in the 19th century liked to see how long they could strike a pose and stay frozen. Wikimedia Commons

History

The Victorian origins of the Mannequin Challenge

Long before smartphones filmed the stiffened appendages of people seeking internet fame, striking a pose was a popular form of entertainment in Victorian England.
Traditional media gatekeepers are toast. 'Toaster' via www.shutterstock.com

Media

Why do we fall for fake news?

Researcher who has studied online news for 20 years says people fall for fake news because they don't value journalistic sources and consider themselves and their friends as credible news sources.
In many cities, the only direction to go is up. 'Skyscrapers' via www.shutterstock.com

Architecture

Trump Tower, the skyscraper and the future of urban development

George Washington had Mount Vernon. Thomas Jefferson had Monticello. Now Trump has his eponymous tower. Can it stimulate a more creative, sustainable approach to building skyscrapers?
In the early stages of his campaign, Donald Trump eagerly made himself available to the press. As president, that’s likely to change. Joe Skipper/Reuters

Media

Experts’ roundtable: The future of journalism in Trump’s America

How can journalists resist a master media manipulator, reach local communities and sift through fake news and propaganda? Media experts explore the challenges of covering the next administration.
Jennie A. Brownscombe’s ‘The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth’ (1914). Wikimedia Commons

History

The two men who almost derailed New England’s first colonies

The Pilgrims were thankful for finally being able to vanquish Thomas Morton and Ferdinando Gorges, who spent years trying to undermine the legal basis for settlements in Massachusetts and beyond.

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