Cash-strapped Hartford is one of a number American cities that have missed out on the nation’s urban renaissance. Jessica Hill/AP Photo

Cities

Gentrification? Bring it

Some gay gang members are open about their sexuality, but others remain in the closet, fearing they could endanger themselves or the status of their gang. Devin/Pexels

Sexuality

What it’s like to be gay and in a gang

A sociologist spent two years interviewing gay gang members. While some were in the closet and others were openly gay, all were forced to reckon with an environment of hypermasculinity.
In the past, kids couldn’t wait to get their driver’s licenses. Now? Not so much. Jenn Huls

Teens

Why today’s teens aren’t in any hurry to grow up

Should parents be worried that many teens are putting off traditional rites of passage like working, driving and dating?
International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach stands between Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garrett to announce winning bids for the upcoming games. AP Photo/Martin Mejia

Sports

Paris and Los Angeles bids to host Olympics expose deeper crisis at Olympic Games

The benefits of hosting the Olympics are so slim, or nonexistent, that fewer cities are bidding to host the games. That's a sign of serious trouble.
A 1765 painting of Helios, the personification of the sun in Greek mythology. Wikimedia Commons

Folklore

How ancient cultures explained eclipses

The sun was worshiped as a deity in many cultures – and witnessing it get extinguished could be a particularly terrifying event.
The small city of Hazard, Kentucky, rests in the heart of Appalachia. AP Photo/David Stephenson

Language

Combatting stereotypes about Appalachian dialects

The founder of the West Virginia Dialect Project hopes to debunk some of the myths about the way Appalachian people speak and instill pride in a rich, oft-maligned culture.
A man sporting a Nazi tattoo leaves Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Virginia on Aug. 12, 2017. Steve Helber/AP Photo

Media

Over the years, Americans have become increasingly exposed to extremism

Given recent events, you might have had an inkling that extremist views have been resonating. Researchers from the Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention have the hard data to back it up.
A statue of Henry David Thoreau in front of a replica of his cabin in Concord, Massachusetts. Chris Devers

Media

Henry David Thoreau’s views of 19th-century media resonate today

Thoreau spent his life pursuing the 'hard bottom' of truth. But he confronted a sensationalist newspaper industry that, in many ways, mimicked today's media environment.

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  4. What it’s like to be gay and in a gang
  5. In Las Vegas, excess and fantasy bleed into tragedy

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