‘It’s really difficult to live as a rock musician in Bangladesh,“ says Samir Hafiz, a guitarist in the heavy metal band Warfaze. Facebook

Music

Rock ‘n’ roll is dying in Bangladesh

For decades, Bangladesh had a very vibrant – and highly political – rock scene. But the genre is struggling to survive the country's crackdown on dissent and increasing Islamic conservatism.
‘Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor’ by William Halsall (1882). Pilgrim Hall Museum

History

Why the Pilgrims were actually able to survive

The Pilgrims repeatedly thanked God for their good fortune. But without two earlier developments, the entire undertaking at New Plymouth would have likely failed.
For decades, native-born American Jews changed their names to improve their job prospects. Billion Photos/Shutterstock.com

Culture

Why are some Americans changing their names?

The demographics of name change petitioners today – and the reasons that they give – tell a complicated story of race, class and culture.
In 2016, nearly 10 percent of American kids were living in three-generation households, like this one in Detroit, Michigan. AP Photo/Paul Sancya

Families

What’s behind the dramatic rise in 3-generation households?

Over the past 20 years, the number of American households that have grandparents, their kids and their grandkids living under the same roof has nearly doubled.
The Supremes, with their polished performances and family-friendly lyrics, helped to bridge a cultural divide and temper racial tensions. AP Photo/Frings

Music

The soundtrack of the Sixties demanded respect, justice and equality

Fifty years ago, Sly and the Family Stone sang 'We got to live together, I am no better and neither are you.' The words ring just as true today.
‘Girl With a Balloon’ was renamed ‘Love Is in the Bin,’ after it self-destructed at a Sotheby’s auction on Oct. 5. Sotheby's

Art History

Banksy and the tradition of destroying art

When artists destroy their works, it's usually to express their disdain for critics, dealers and curators. But does this get lost in the attention, hype and money that follows?
Young adults now spend more money on costumes than any other age group. Michaela Rehle/Reuters

Culture

Why has Halloween become so popular among adults?

The holiday used to be all about trick-or-treating in the neighborhood. No more – and it could something to do with the fact that traditional markers of adulthood have changed.
A pot of flowers adorned with a cross hangs from the picket fence where University of Wyoming student Matthew Shepard was tied, beaten and left for dead in October 1998. Gary Caskey/Reuters

Sexuality

Out of Matthew Shepard’s tragic murder, a commitment to punishing hate crimes emerged

Twenty years ago, Matthew Shepard was brutally murdered for being gay. A lawyer who helped implement hate crime legislation in Shepard's name reflects on its strengths and limitations.
A bridge in Palu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, was destroyed in the recent earthquake and tsunami. AP Photo/Aaron Favila

Culture

An Indonesian city’s destruction reverberates across Sulawesi

The devastation of the recent earthquake and tsunami might be most visible in Palu, the capital city of Central Sulawesi. But the province’s rural areas could ultimately suffer the most.
Some believe the color pink can calm unruly inmates. Others say it’s a form of humiliation. Mohd KhairilX/Shutterstock.com

Design

Can pink really pacify?

Famously feminized by the Nazis – and later used in prison cells to limit aggression in inmates – the color pink toes a shaky line between social psychology and gender stereotyping.
Do we have any reason to believe that each new generation of white people will be more open-minded and tolerant than previous ones? Elvira Koneva

Race

Are today’s white kids less racist than their grandparents?

Over the course of two years, a sociologist studied a group of affluent, white kids to see how they made sense of sensitive racial issues like privilege, unequal opportunity and police violence.

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