Syrian anti-government protesters march as part of an uprising against the country’s authoritarian regime, in Banias, Syria, April 17, 2011. The Arabic banner at center reads: ‘All of us would die for our country.’ AP/Anonymous

How the Syrian uprising began and why it matters

While in other countries, women are bringing down the powerful men who assaulted and harassed them, in Indonesia assault victims are still struggling to find justice. www.shutterstock.com

#MeToo has skipped Indonesia — here’s why

A combination of a deep-rooted patriarchal culture, conservative religious values and gender-insensitive law enforcement practices still deters Indonesian women from reporting rape.
Smartphones have put the tools for bullying and voyeurism in the pockets of schoolchildren. Baruska/Pixabay

France’s ‘everyday sexism’ starts at school

France's #MeToo backlash has revealed just how deeply rooted sexism is in the country. Disguised as flirtation or child's play, sexual harassment begins as early as elementary school.
Clashes between opposition protesters and Venezuelan soldiers at the Venezuela-Brazil border have killed an estimated 25 people. AP Photo/Edmar Barros

Brazil and Venezuela clash over migrants, humanitarian aid and closed borders

Brazil's president has threatened military intervention in neighboring Venezuela, called its leader a 'dictator' and sent troops to the border. But Brazil's military is quietly working to avoid war.
Hotels and motels along major highways are common spots for sex trafficking. Ken Stocker/shutterstock.com

Sex trafficking in the US: 4 questions answered

New England Patriots CEO Robert Kraft's criminal charges in a suspected sex trafficking case draw new attention to this illicit underground economy.
When U.S. troops go home, ethnic militias will likely gain strength. REUTERS/Parwiz

What will come after a US withdrawal from Afghanistan?

The US has been at war in Afghanistan since a few weeks after 9/11. Now we are negotiating a peace with the Taliban, the same insurgents who sheltered Osama bin Laden.
Three British teenagers, including Shamima Begum, center, left the U.K. to join the Islamic State in 2015. Begum wants to return home now. AP/Metropolitan Police

Is it more dangerous to let Islamic State foreign fighters from the West return or prevent them from coming back?

Many of the men and women who left homes in the West to join ISIS or similar terrorist organizations in Syria and Iraq as fighters or supporters now want to come home. Should they be allowed back?

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