Burmese fishermen raise their hands as they are asked who among them wants to go home. Human trafficking sometimes occurs in the seafood industry. AP Photo/Dita Alangkara

Fact check: How many people are enslaved in the world today?

Estimates of modern slavery vary widely, whether they try to pin down numbers in the U.S., across the globe or just in certain industries.
GOP President Ronald Reagan and Democratic House Speaker Tip O'Neill at the April, 1983 signing of bipartisan social security legislation. AP/Barry Thumma

Congress used to pass bipartisan legislation – will it ever again?

Most Congresses since the 1970s have passed more than 500 laws, ranging from nuclear disarmament to deficit reduction. Will today's bitter partisanship hamstring the new Congress' productivity?
Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro at his swearing-in ceremony at the Supreme Court in Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos

Venezuelans reject Maduro presidency — but most would oppose foreign military operation to oust him

Maduro, who was sworn in for his second term on Jan. 10, has rigged elections, jailed rivals and plunged Venezuela into crisis. But Trump's proposed 'military option' to remove him remains unpopular.
A woman casts her ballot at a polling station during a runoff presidential election in Bamako, Mali on Aug. 12, 2018. Reuters/Luc Gnago

Competitive elections are good for democracy – just not every democracy

Elections are supposed to hold politicians accountable: Officials who fear losing their seat will work harder for voters. But in some countries, political competition actually makes government worse.
An anti-Brexit protester speaks during a demonstration. Reuters/Henry Nicholls

How Trump and Brexit united Europe

Back in 2016, the Brexit vote and US presidential election seemed like a nationalist one-two punch that could knock out the European Union. Instead, EU support actually rose, new research shows.
A family from the Central American migrant caravan at the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

Who is responsible for migrants?

Donald Trump portrays migrants as a foreign problem 'dumped' on America's doorstep. That view ignores the global forces that bind nations together, including trade, climate change and colonization.

Research and Expert Database

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