Images of Donald Trump from the midterm campaign. Illustration by Bob Britten

What image will define the 2018 election?

Here's a riddle: What's the dominant image of the 2018 election campaign? There isn't one. But there are many.
Prayers outside the Tree of Life synagogue. Reuters/Cathal McNaughton

How safe is your place of worship?

A national survey of over 1,300 congregations found that religious leaders struggle to balance security concerns with carrying out a mission to be open to the communities they serve.
California’s Katie Porter, seen here with Democratic candidates and former president Barack Obama, is one of just three first-time female congressional candidates in California. AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu

Female candidates running in record numbers for the midterms — just not in California

A record number of women are poised to win public office in 2018. But don't look to California for help shifting the gender balance in Congress during the 'year of the woman.'
A woman walks past Robert Graham’s sculpture, ‘Dance Door,’ in Los Angeles, 2015. AP Photo/Nick Ut

The unimaginable costs of sexual assault

A well-known scholar of violence against women describes her own harrowing assault – and how the #MeToo movement changed her professionally and personally.
Social media misinformation rose significantly before the 2016 presidential election. Georgejmclittle/shutterstock.com

Unlike in 2016, there was no spike in misinformation this election cycle

The Iffy Quotient measured misinformation on social media in the run-up to the recent elections. Facebook has gotten better at combating untrustworthy links, but Twitter still struggles.
New York police officers at the Time Warner Center, Oct. 25, 2018, in New York after report of a suspicious package at CNN. AP/Craig Ruttle

Bombs are part of American political history

Bombs have long been a tool for devotees of the range of fringe American political thought. From anarchists to racists, their methods have wrought havoc – but also have created backlash.
Vigil held in the Squirrel Hill section of Pittsburgh for shooting victims, Oct. 27, 2018. AP/Gene J. Puskar

Pittsburgh’s lesson: Hatred does not emerge in a vacuum

Mass murders like the killings at a Pittsburgh synagogue are seen as the work of disturbed individuals. But America has allowed violence to become unexceptional, ignoring its root cause.
A memorial vigil for the victims of the shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue where a shooter killed 11 and wounded six on Oct. 27, 2018. AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar

Terror isn’t always a weapon of the weak – it can also support the powerful

The attack at a synagogue in Pittsburgh and the sending of pipe bombs to critics of the current administration are examples of the increase in the violence on the margins of the right.

Research and Expert Database

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