University of Alberta

The University of Alberta in Edmonton is one of Canada’s top teaching and research universities, with an international reputation for excellence across the humanities, sciences, creative arts, business, engineering, and health sciences. Home to 39,000 students and 15,000 faculty and staff, the university has an annual budget of $1.84 billion and attracts nearly $450 million in sponsored research revenue. The U of A offers close to 400 rigorous undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs in 18 faculties on five campuses—including one rural and one francophone campus. The university has more than 275,000 alumni worldwide. The university and its people remain dedicated to the promise made in 1908 by founding president Henry Marshall Tory that knowledge shall be used for “uplifting the whole people.”

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Police investigate the scene where a car crashed into a roadblock during a suspected terrorist attack in Edmonton on Sept. 30. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson)

How terrorists use propaganda to recruit lone wolves

The recent Edmonton attack raises questions about a new type of terrorism and the different methods required to stop it. Labelling such attacks as the work of a "lone wolf" obscures a larger problem.
Crystal Pepsi, seen here on sale recently as part of a nostalgia campaign, was considered one of Pepsi’s epic fails. (Creative Commons)

Enabling innovation: Lessons from Crystal Pepsi

It can be much easier to develop a new product than to actually get people to try it, even for big established brands. Where did launches for products like Crystal Pepsi go wrong?
There are real consequences to ignoring children’s pain in hospital. These include increased sensitivity to pain, abnormal social behaviours when older and higher levels of anxiety before a future procedure. (Shutterstock)

Seven ways to soothe your child’s pain in the hospital

From broken limbs to blood tests, hospital visits can cause unnecessary pain for children. An emergency care pediatrician offers seven easy strategies for parents to lessen this pain.
Creating a ‘digital story’ of their memories using photos, music, text and video, can hep dementia patients open up to their fear and move into optimism. (Shutterstock)

Digital life stories spark joy in people with dementia

When dementia patients use photos and music to produce digital stories about events in their lives, they start to remember. They also face their fears about the disease, and experience happiness.
Grizzly trophy-hunting is at the heart of a ferocious debate in North America. (Shutterstock)

Fierce debate roars to life over grizzly bear hunt

A bitter debate has erupted over the British Columbia government's recent decision to end grizzly bear trophy hunting. Here are the pros and cons of stopping the hunt.
Cannabis is the most widely available and most used illegal substance in the world, and Canadian youth are among the top users. Parents and their kids need to prepare for the day it becomes legal in Canada in 2018. (Shutterstock)

Legal weed: What your kids really need to know

Parents can help protect their kids from cannabis abuse by openly discussing the health risks, the pleasures and the responsible ways to use the drug.
Tardar Sauce, la chatte de Tabatha Bundesen, désormais mieux connue sous le nom de « Grumpy Cat », a fait sensation sur Internet à cause de son expression faciale boudeuse. AP Photo/Richard Vogel

Nos animaux domestiques sont-ils heureux ? Observez leur minois !

Nous pouvons facilement deviner ce que ressentent nos amis en observant leur visage. Des scientifiques parviennent, de mieux en mieux, à en faire de même avec les animaux.
Disability prejudice in the classroom can teach children early on that some lives are more worthy than others. (Shutterstock)

Think disability is a tragedy? We pity you

Two university professors explore their unlikely longtime friendship, providing lessons for parents of both "abled" and disabled children today.
A kingfisher’s beak inspired the design of high-speed trains in Japan, through the process of ‘biomimicry,’ or human imitation of nature. (Shutterstock)

How modern technology is inspired by the natural world

From kingfishers to dandelion seeds and bone tissue, natural organisms are the source of many radical human innovations in technology and medicine.
Cover art from “Annie Muktuk and Other Stories,” Norma Dunning’s first book filled with sixteen Inuit stories which portray the unvarnished realities of northern life via strong and gritty characters. (University of Alberta Press)

Writing is the air I breathe: Publishing as an Inuit writer

Inuit poet, scholar and writer Norma Dunning shares her experiences of trying to get published in Canada.
A flag with a portrait of Russian President Vladimir Putin waves over the Moscow crowd during the Vesna (Spring) festival in March commemorating the Crimean annexation. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

How Putin used propaganda to deftly turn Russians against Ukrainians

Vladimir Putin fomented so-called Ukrainophobia leading up to his annexation of Crimea. Ukrainians, on the other hand, held positive views of their neighbours prior to annexation.
Tabatha Bundesen’s pet Tardar Sauce became an Internet sensation known as “Grumpy Cat” for a resting facial appearance that resembles a look of dissatisfaction. Now, scientists are starting to be able to read animal emotions from their expressions. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

Animal emotions stare us in the face — are our pets happy?

Scientists are beginning to link animal facial expressions to emotions, making it possible for us to understand how they feel.
Premier Christy Clark leaves the legislative assembly after her government lost a confidence vote on June 30. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito)

The ‘glass cliff’ is steep for Canada’s female politicians

Female leaders still face a hostile political environment in Canada, even though the provinces offer increasingly fertile ground for women in political leadership roles.

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