Queen's University, Ontario

Established in 1841 and one of Canada’s oldest degree-granting institutions, Queen’s today is a mid-sized university that provides a transformative student learning experience within a research-intensive environment A member of the prestigious U15 group of research-intensive Canadian universities, Queen’s conducts leading-edge research in areas of critical concern. Queen’s is also a member of the Matariki Network, an international group of research-intensive universities with a strong shared commitment to the undergraduate and graduate student learning experience.

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In this Aug. 28, 1963, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses marchers during his “I Have a Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. (AP Photo, File)

If I can dream: The Elvis tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr.

Fifty years ago Elvis Presley sang a tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr: "If I Can Dream." English professor Robert Morrison goes back to that moment and looks at the lyrics written in honour of MLK.
Russian President Vladimir Putin has been described as a Byzantine Emperor in style, positioning Russia as the “third Rome.” In western history books, on the other hand, the Bzyantine Empire is all but ignored, pointing as it does to the east. AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)

The Byzantine history of Putin’s Russian empire

Russian president Vladimir Putin draws upon the imperial symbols of the Byzantine Empire to position Russia as the "third Rome." Meanwhile, Byzantium is erased by western history books.
New research reveals that the highest rates of depression are seen in individuals with autism who have above average intelligence. This is different to the general population, where lower intelligence is linked to higher rates of depression. (Unsplash/Ben White)

Almost half of adults with autism struggle with depression

New research reveals the burden of depression on individuals with autism, and that depression rates are higher among those with above average IQ.
According to research, gamers are well-aware of the artificiality of the fictional video game world. (Screenshot/DICE)

Why violence in video games isn’t really a problem

Do video games increase violent behaviour? A music scholar who has focused on how musical elements contribute to immersion in video games explores the issue.
Rising global temperatures may make many cities too warm to host the Winter Games in the future. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Will the Olympics’ green makeover have lasting effects?

The Olympic Games are an ideal venue to showcase new ideas to world. In a world where reducing carbon emissions is a priority, could the Olympics be doing more?
Fireworks explode behind the Olympic flame during the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, (AP Photo/David J. Phillip,Pool)

Music of champions: How CBC and NBC Olympic themes shape our differences

CBC and NBC's theme music that fills our ears before and after commercials and quietly accompanies intimate athlete profiles can actually have an impact on the way we view sports.
The movement away from religion towards “spirituality” reflects a desire to leave behind hierarchical understandings of religion towards a more socially liberal one. Ben White/unsplash

Millennials abandon hope for religion but revere human rights

Canada is increasingly moving towards a secular culture. "Spiritual but not religious" has become our new norm -- bringing with it ideas of mutual respect and protection for marginalized identities.
To break down the “math barrier” that has been shown to limit success in school, career and life, all children must learn their times tables. (Shutterstock)

Why all children must learn their times tables — and fun ways to teach them

Parents can teach very young children to "skip count" at the kitchen table, and it will set them up to be successful math learners throughout their secondary and post-secondary education.
Legislative issues around prostitution have the ability to lead the conversation and determine research priorities. Here, Terri-Jean Bedford makes a victory sign with Nikki Thomas, left, and Valerie Scott, right, after the Ontario’s Court of Appeal struck down a ban on brothels in 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim

Who are we talking about when we talk about prostitution and sex work?

Prostitution is now illegal in Canada. Is prostitution harmful and exploitative? Or is sex work a legitimate form of labour?
Canada needs to introduce policies that will decrease greenhouse gas emissions while its population grows. (Shutterstock)

How your online shopping is impeding Canada’s emissions targets

Canada's growing population and online shopping habits make meeting our emissions targets a challenge. With some targeted intervention, we can transform our economy, and society, for the better.
The Norman Wells pipeline connects oil fields in the Northwest Territories to Alberta. Edward Struzik

A red alert for the future Arctic

There are many debates northerners should have about the future Arctic, but the development of oil and gas is not one of them.
Perhaps the designers of the first Christmas card from 1840 were influenced by Leigh Hunt’s question: Is it right to spend, laugh and revel when there are so many people who live in isolation and poverty? John Calcott Horsely, curator and designer of the card, asked the painter, Sir Henry Cole, to show people being fed and clothed to remind his friends of the needs of the poor during this season.

Lifting the whole world: Leigh Hunt’s message for Christmas Day

Leigh Hunt is a nineteenth-century writer who grappled with the question: How can we celebrate and enjoy ourselves at this time of the year when there is so much misery in the world?
Protect the baby boomers in your life when you give them them technology gifts by giving them the gift of time to go along with their new device. (Shutterstock)

Tech gifts for unsavvy seniors may put your loved ones at risk

Gifting techno-gadgets to baby boomers may be a good idea but may also put them at risk from sophisticated surveillance technology. To protect them, give the gift of time to go along with the new device.
A scientist works with DNA samples in a New Orleans laboratory in 2011. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

You’ve got your DNA kit: Now what can you do with it?

The rapid growth of genetic testing and data-gathering could revolutionize health and medicine if governments work to protect people against privacy and societal risks.
It’s the 200th anniversary of the first publication of Jane Austen’s novel, “Persuasion.” This illustration by artist Liz Monahan depicts Captain Wentworth writing his love letter to Anne. (Liz Monahan)

‘Persuasion:’ Jane Austen’s greatest novel turns 200

Prof. Robert Morrison edited Jane Austen's "Persuasion" for Harvard University Press. On the classic's 200th anniversary, he explains how Austen's rhythmic words on loss, love and hope still resonate.
Parents find new methods for learning math challenging, as they are different. But they work for children, building upon what they have learned about numbers and reinforcing the strategy they use for reading. (Shutterstock)

The ‘new math’: How to support your child in elementary school

You may not know it, but the elementary math wars are raging. Our expert explains the 'new math' - why it works for kids, and how to do it.
Rick Sanchez of the animated series Rick and Morty embodies the erroneous popular archetype of the scientist as eccentric lone genius. (Handout)

Myth of the genius solitary scientist is dangerous

The myth of the lone genius, hero scientist is dangerous for science and society. Here's how to fix it.

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