Queen's University, Ontario

Established in 1841 and one of Canada’s oldest degree-granting institutions, Queen’s today is a mid-sized university that provides a transformative student learning experience within a research-intensive environment A member of the prestigious U15 group of research-intensive Canadian universities, Queen’s conducts leading-edge research in areas of critical concern. Queen’s is also a member of the Matariki Network, an international group of research-intensive universities with a strong shared commitment to the undergraduate and graduate student learning experience.

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President Donald Trump tosses paper towels into a crowd at Calvary Chapel in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico in October 2017 following Hurricane Maria. Trump congratulated Puerto Rico for escaping the higher death toll of “a real catastrophe like Katrina.” A new study suggests almost 3,000 people died in Puerto Rico. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Politics and paper towels: Disputing disaster death tolls

As Trump fumes about the Hurricane Maria death toll, it's clear that politics and political considerations often play an important role in how death toll estimates are communicated to the public.
‘Hotel Mumbai’ is a gripping film that provides a glimpse into the fear and brutality of terrorism but also the everyday bravery of its victims. Here Armie Hammer in ‘Hotel Mumbai.’ Courtesy of TIFF

Terrorism at the Taj: ‘Hotel Mumbai’ pulls no punches at TIFF

'Hotel Mumbai,' which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, is an 'anthem of resistance;' a film that highlights the things ordinary people can do in extraordinary circumstances.
Self-help leaders can convince us that we have the responsibility to improve our lives. But this can ignore the realities of social inequities. Tony Robbins, motivational speaker, personal finance instructor and self-help author on ‘Wall Street Week’ in 2016. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Self-help in the ‘age of responsibility’ denies unequal realities

Self-help books can help us get through difficult times by telling us we have the agency to take control. But this method can also ignore structural inequities and negatively influence public policy.
Ride-hailing services have gone global, and even women in Saudi Arabia – only recently given the right to drive – are getting in on the action. In this June 2018 photo, a female driver for Careem, a regional ride-hailing Uber competitor, is seen behind the wheel. AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

Canada left behind as ride-hailing services go global

Canada is simply a consumer of ride-hailing services, and has not established any of its own Ubers or Lyfts, even as tiny countries like Estonia get in on the game. That needs to change.
The Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St-Laurent sails past a iceberg in Lancaster Sound in 2008. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

As ice recedes, the Arctic isn’t prepared for more shipping traffic

New shipping opportunities are opening up in the Arctic as sea ice continues to recede. But travel is still dangerous and the region isn't equipped to deal with more vessel traffic.
A few woefully underfunded academic health sciences centres are responsible for providing complex care to patients with life-threatening illnesses as well as training future doctors and testing the latest in new surgical techniques. (Shutterstock)

Why we need academic health science centres

Canada's systems of health funding, medical training and physician compensation need an overhaul – to support vital centres of medical research and complex care.
A firefighter runs while trying to save a home near Lakeport, Calif. on July 31, 2018. AP Photo/Noah Berger, File

Fighting historic wildfires amid bad ideas and no funding

Canada's boreal region faces bigger, hotter and more frequent wildfires that are increasingly unpredictable, but it lacks an investment in fire science that could help keep communities safe.
A top hit in 1975, Neil Sedaka’s song “The Immigrant,” proves its continuing relevance, with the rise in xenophobia in the United States. Here people on an Atlantic Liner arrive at what is probably Ellis Island, the gateway for over 12 million immigrants to the U.S. from 1892 to 1954. Library of Congress

Neil Sedaka’s 1975 song revived for anti-immigrant era

Neil Sedaka's song “The Immigrant” was a top hit in 1975, but today it seems even more relevant, as debates rage in the United States over immigration, repatriation and racism.
U.S. President Donald Trump, seen on the South Lawn of the White House on July 27, 2018, is eroding American diplomacy with his penchant for what’s known as hard power over soft power. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The erosion of American diplomacy

Donald Trump is eroding American diplomacy and what's known as soft power. Here's how that may result in a new world order.
In 2016, the Ontario government promised the province’s schools would teach all students about residential schools and add more Indigenous perspectives into the provincial curriculum. The newly elected Conservative government has scrapped those plans. Library and Archives Canada

Nixing plans to add Indigenous content to Ontario curriculum is a travesty

Ontario's move to ignore the calls of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to add Indigenous content to its history and social studies curriculum is foolish and dangerous.
Aug. 12, 2017: white nationalist demonstrators use shields as they guard the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

The 100-year-old rallying cry of ‘white genocide’

White supremacists push an agenda that have their followers believing they are in danger of extinction. But their 'race suicide' ideas are based on 100-year-old unscientific and racist research.
Research shows that the number of drug shortages in Canada are increasing, even though patients may not be aware of it. (Shutterstock))

The creeping problem of drug shortages

The Canadian government must undertake regular analysis of the drug shortage problem, if we are ever to develop sustainable solutions.
There are now many gender categorizations, from the traditional ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ to ‘gender fluid’ and ‘undifferentiatied.’ Health researchers can work with these to gain a more accurate understanding of disease susceptibilities. (Shutterstock)

Sex and gender both shape your health, in different ways

Bigender, gender fluid, cisgender? Emerging gender categorizations are important -- for your health.
Executive pay is an issue that often causes public uproar. But it’s not as greed-driven as we might think. Razvan Chisu/Unsplash

The uproar over executive pay isn’t entirely warranted

High CEO compensation angers the public, particularly when it doesn't seemed tied to performance. But as a whole, trends in executive compensation are consistent with fundamental economic forces.
The wilderness in Canada’s parks is shrinking due to encroaching business. Pictured here: the Glacier Skywalk in Jasper National Park is cantilevered 280 metres over the Sunwapta Valley floor. (Jack Borno/Wikimedia)

It’s time to press the reset button on Canada’s national parks

Canada's national parks don't need more visitors. They could use more scientists, and better science, to help conserve the country's species.
A vaccine (toxoid) against diphtheria first became available in Toronto in 1926. Thanks to the work of the Toronto Diphtheria Committee, the city was diphtheria-free by 1940. (Shutterstock)

How to increase childhood vaccination rates

Toronto's fight against diptheria teaches us the powerful impact of public health campaigns -- in persuading parents to vaccinate their children.
Houston Rockets head coach Mike D'Antoni, during Game 2 of the NBA basketball Western Conference finals against the Golden State Warriors in Houston. D'Antoni successfully resisted calls to change his team’s offensive strategy after losing Game 1. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Management wisdom from the NBA: sometimes the best move is the one you don’t make

Research has shown that the most successful basketball coaches resist pressure to make changes during games. Choosing not to make a move is sometimes also the right call for business leaders.
President Nana Akufo-Addo of Ghana addresses the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters in September 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Lessons from religious groups for a ‘Ghana beyond aid’

Ghanaians respond positively to financial appeals from churches compared to how they respond to paying taxes. Here's how, and why, Ghana's government should learn from religious groups.

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