Judith Kerr, author of the Tiger Who Came to Tea, at the International Literature Festival Berlin in 2016. Christoph Rieger

Judith Kerr: read her autobiographies to understand The Tiger Who Came to Tea

As the daughter in a Jewish family fleeing the Nazis, Judith Kerr's childhood was change, upheaval and deprivation. But this 'clever refugee girl' made her mark, creating stories of ideal childhood.

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