University of Manchester

The University of Manchester, a member of the Russell Group, is one of the largest and most popular universities in the UK. It has 20 academic schools and hundreds of specialist research groups undertaking pioneering multi-disciplinary teaching and research of worldwide significance. According to the results of the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008), The University of Manchester is one of the country’s major research institutions, rated third in the UK in terms of ‘research power’. The University has an annual income of £807 million and is ranked 40th in the world and fifth in the UK for the quality of its teaching and impact of its research.


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We thought Malcolm Turnbull had nailed his colours to the mast on climate policy - but maybe not. AAP Image/Joel Carrett

Another prime minister, another endorsement for coal – but why?

Malcolm Turnbull has said coal will be important for "many decades to come" – joining a long line of prime ministers who talked big on climate policy but found themselves talking up fossil fuels.
Australian wind energy has been under a cloud for much of its decades-long history. AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Attacks on renewable energy policy are older than the climate issue itself

Skirmishes over funding for renewable energy research are just the latest battle in a saga that stretches back to the early 1980s – years before the public became widely aware of the climate threat.
Senator Ian Macdonald, pictured here speaking against the carbon tax in 2014, has since described human-induced climate change as “farcical and fanciful”. AAP Image/Alan Porritt

How climate denial gained a foothold in the Liberal Party, and why it still won’t go away

After fighting the 1990 election on a stronger climate platform than Labor, the following two decades saw an ebb and flow of climate scepticism in the Liberal Party, which still continues today.
Prime Minister Bob Hawke opening the General Assembly of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, Perth, November 1990. National Archives of Australia

Cabinet papers 1990: déjà vu? We’re having the same debate about climate as we were then

The National Archives of Australia today released selected federal cabinet records for 1990 and 1991. They reveal intense battles over Australia's domestic climate targets and, above all, a palpable determination that Australia not damage its coal revenue.
Protests at climate talks in New York in 2014. EPA/ANDREW KELLY

Timeline: UN climate negotiations

1988 marked the first call for climate action from the scientific community. Nearly 30 years later it's been a bumpy ride.
Ros Kelly was the first in a long line of federal ministers to address themselves to the question of Australia’s emissions target. AAP Image/Lee Besford

25 years ago the Australian government promised deep emissions cuts, and yet here we still are

When Australia's government first pledged to set an emission-reduction target, Jon Bon Jovi was riding high in the charts. The progress made in the 25 years since has hardly been a blaze of glory.

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