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Tourism and technology

Participants in a virtual reality travel experience reported a sense of relaxation, similar to that gained from travel in real life. Shutterstock

VR technology gives new meaning to ‘holidaying at home’. But is it really a substitute for travel?

Mind wandering engages the same neural pathways used to receive stimuli from the real world, evoking emotions similar to real life. VR can elicit these same feelings.

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My favourite gem

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From around the world

Your nose knows what’s on the way. Lucy Chian/Unsplash

Why you can smell rain

A weather expert explains where petrichor – that pleasant, earthy scent that accompanies a storm's first raindrops – comes from.

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