Analysis and Comment

The living coelacanth in its natural environment off the South African coast. Laurent Ballesta, Gombessa expeditions, Andromede Oceanology Ltd (from the book Gombessa, meeting with the coelacanth)

We scanned one of our closest cousins, the coelacanth, to learn how its brain grows

The discovery of a living coelacanth fish rocked the world in 1939, as scientists thought they had died out with the dinosaurs. A new study illuminates how its skull and tiny brain develop.

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Year of the elements

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Curious Kids

Do you think you could make an echo at Echo Point in Katoomba? Flickr/Amanda Slater

Curious Kids: what makes an echo?

When a sound is made, it spreads. And when it hits a hard surface that is far away, it bounces back and comes back to where the sound was made. That's what we call an echo.

Curious Kids: What is dew?

When water turns from a gas into a liquid, it forms droplets. Whether those droplets are dew or rain depends on where the droplet forms.

Curious Kids: why do we have a drought?

We can't make it rain. But you are already helping if you don't use more water than you need. And you can talk to your parents about the planet getting warmer, because the heat makes drought worse.

Curious Kids: why are burps so loud?

As gas from your stomach comes up your food pipe, it makes the surface of the upper part of your oesophagus rattle and vibrate. It is a bit like windows that rattle during a windy storm.

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