Analysis and Comment

Networking online might not be so good for your “social capital” overall. Kyle Steed/Flickr

The internet helps us translate ‘social capital’ to economic benefits

Spending lots of time on the internet might be good for getting what you want in the short term but it might not work in the long term.

How Airbnb is reshaping our cities

If the sharing economy is here to stay, planners and designers must respond with imagination to spread the positive effects of the tourism economy for the benefit of residents as well as tourists.

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