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Articles on Brain health

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Coping with everyday affronts comes at a cost and requires a certain level of emotional suppression. RyanJLane/E+ via Getty Images

Racism produces subtle brain changes that lead to increased disease risk in Black populations

Racial threats and slights take a toll on health, but the continual invalidation and questioning of whether those so-called microaggressions exist has an even more insidious effect, research shows.
Lifestyle changes may be our best hope of delaying dementia or not developing dementia at all. (Shutterstock)

Lifestyle changes can reduce dementia risk by maintaining brain plasticity — but the time to act is now

Lifestyle-related dementia risks are complex, with factors like sleep, exercise, diet and social contact interacting with things like cognitive reserve, neuroplasticity and inflammation in the body.
Every brain injury is unique, as is every person’s path to recovery. Chinnapong/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Brains have a remarkable ability to rewire themselves following injury − a concussion specialist explains the science behind rehabilitation and recovery

Concussions can teach researchers a great deal about how the brain recovers after injury and offer insights into how people can promote brain health throughout their lives.
Advanced Alzheimer’s disease can be seen on brain scans, but gathering more data could allow for earlier diagnosis and treatment. Shutterstock/Rakstaput

Setting the stage for a better understanding of complex brain disorders

Disorders such as Alzheimer’s and epilepsy are difficult to diagnose with only occasional doctor visits. A new approach would allow fathering of extensive real-world data directly from patients.
Concussion doesn’t just happen in sports or only in teens and young adults; it affects people of all ages and backgrounds. (Shutterstock)

Concussion is more than sports injuries: Who’s at risk and how Canadian researchers are seeking better diagnostics and treatments

Canadian researchers are exploring unanswered questions about concussion: How to diagnose it accurately and quickly, how to predict outcomes and promote recovery, and how to prevent it altogether.
Wildfire smoke contains a mixture of toxic pollutants that can be harmful to both the lungs and the brain. Bloomberg Creative/ Bloomberg Creative Photos via Getty Images

Neurotoxins in the environment are damaging human brain health – and more frequent fires and floods may make the problem worse

Pollution from more frequent floods and wildfires – exacerbated by the warming climate – is threatening human health and poses particular risks to the brain.

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