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Articles on Franklin Delano Roosevelt

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Sen. Kamala Harris speaks via video link during the second day of confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on Oct. 13, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

How the Supreme Court can maintain its legitimacy amid intensifying partisanship

Though critics claim Amy Coney Barrett's nomination jeopardizes the high court's legitimacy, research shows there are ways the judiciary can bolster its standing and weather controversial decisions.
White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows speaks to reporters about President Trump’s positive coronavirus test outside the White House on Oct. 2, 2020. Drew Angerer/Getty

A brief history of presidents disclosing – or trying to hide – health problems

President Trump was direct in announcing he had COVID-19. But presidents in the past have been very good at deceiving the public about the state of their health. Which direction will Trump go now?
A crowd greets Sen. John F. Kennedy at Logan Airport in Boston on July 17, 1960, after he became the Democratic nominee for president. John M. Hurley/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Presidential campaigns take flight in the age of the coronavirus

Though air travel has boosted presidential campaigns for decades, the 2020 pandemic has underlined the importance of aircraft as the quickest and safest way to campaign.
Delegates after Donald Trump accepted the GOP presidential nomination at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio on Thursday, July 21, 2016. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/via Getty

Political conventions today are for partying and pageantry, not picking nominees

Political conventions used to pick presidential nominees in private. Now the public picks the nominee and then the party has a big party at the convention, writes a scholar of US elections.
President Donald Trump at the Tulsa campaign rally, where he said he had slowed down COVID-19 testing to keep the numbers low. Win McNamee/Getty Images

Leaders like Trump fail if they cannot speak the truth and earn trust

The absence of trust in a nation's leader and government jeopardizes an effective response to a health crisis. It also creates a political crisis, a loss of faith in democracy.
Franklin Roosevelt and other administration officials visit a Civilian Conservation Corps Camp during the New Deal. Library of Congress/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images

To achieve a new New Deal, Democrats must learn from the old one

Similarities between the 1930s and today are hard to ignore, but Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal teaches us that several developments have to coincide to generate a lasting social safety net.
President and Mrs. Roosevelt enjoying after-luncheon conversation with patients of the Warm Springs Foundation. Bettmann/Contributor via Getty Images

What FDR’s polio crusade teaches us about presidential leadership amid crisis

Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s personal battle with polio, and his steady hand while overseeing a national eradication campaign, highlights decisive leadership against a virus that terrified America.
The Capital One Arena, home of the Washington Capitals, sits empty. AP Photo/Nick Wass

A world without sports

This isn't the first time sports have been put on hold. But in the past, the reprieve was brief, and sports went on to act as a way to bring Americans together. This time's different.
You can’t threaten or humiliate a virus. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

When confronting the coronavirus, tough isn’t enough

The 'tough guy' is a cultural archetype that political leaders have long adopted. But during crises, Americans tend to look for a different kind of hero.
An emergency polio ward in Boston in 1955 equipped with iron lungs. These pressurized respirators acted as breathing muscles for polio victims, often children, who were paralyzed. www.apimages.com

The deadly polio epidemic and why it matters for coronavirus

Polio was nearly eradicated with the Salk vaccine in 1955. At the time, little was known about this mysterious disease that paralyzed and sometimes killed young children.
The lawsuit filed by New York Attorney General Letitia James and 13 colleagues was the last roadblock to the merger. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

How the T-Mobile-Sprint merger will increase inequality

The T-Mobile-Sprint merger is the latest example of weakened enforcement of antitrust laws, which reduces competition and exacerbates already-record levels of inequality.
Senator Huey Long at the Capitol in 1935. Everett Historical/Shutterstock.com

The secret origins of presidential polling

The very first scientific horse race poll, which took place 85 years ago, was shrouded in secrecy and may have changed history – even though it was faulty.

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