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Articles on US Supreme Court

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Primary care providers comprise nearly a third of the U.S. clinician workforce. Tetra Images/via Getty Images

How primary care is poised to support reproductive health and abortion in the post-Roe era

Primary care doctors have long played an important role in providing birth control. Now, with the fall of Roe, they could help fill a critical need for comprehensive family planning services.
When people who are split on abortion speak directly with each other, various good outcomes – including policy change – can happen. Vector Illustration

There’s reason for people on opposing sides of abortion to talk, even if they disagree – it helps build respect, understanding and can lead to policy change

When ideological enemies talk across their great divides, something good can happen – it reduces stereotypes and inflammatory language directed at people who don’t agree on the abortion rights issue.
A same-sex marriage supporter waves a rainbow flag outside the Supreme Court in 2015. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Congress is considering making same-sex marriage federal law – a political scientist explains how this issue became less polarized over time

The U.S. House of Representatives recently voted for a bill that would federally protect same-sex marriage – and 47 Republicans signed on, too. Same-sex marriage isn’t the partisan issue it once was.
Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation Chuck Hoskin Jr. speaks in Tahlequah, Okla. A U.S. Supreme Court ruling is upending decades of law in support of tribes. AP Photo/Michael Woods

Supreme Court reversed almost 200 years of US law and tradition upholding tribal sovereignty in its latest term

For the past 50 years, the Supreme Court has issued rulings that narrow tribal rights while Congress has worked to expand them. A recent ruling struck yet another blow against Native sovereignty.
Abortion-rights protesters shout slogans after tying green flags to the fence of the White House in Washington, D.C. on July 9, 2022. AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe

Religious liberty has a long and messy history – and there is a reason Americans feel strongly about it

Historians of American religious history explain why the Supreme Court’s recent religious liberty rulings are an example of America’s long struggle to define religious freedom.
A sign reads ‘I’m on your side’ outside the Hope Medical Group for Women in Shreveport, La., in April 2022. Francois Picard/AFP via Getty Images

Abortion funds may not be able to keep up with rising demands, as more people travel out of state for the procedure

Abortion funds, which help people who cannot afford the procedure, are facing new kinds of pressures, including potential legal risks and a rising client demand that exceeds their capabilities.
An abortion rights activists is detained on June 30, 2022, during a rally near the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images)

Access to reproductive health care has been harder for Black and brown women – overturning Roe made it harder

By overturning Roe v. Wade, the US Supreme Court has thrown the issue of abortion back to the states – and made it harder for Black and brown women to have access to reproductive health services.
Ben Franklin, center, inserted an abortion recipe in a popular textbook he republished in 1748. GraphicaArtis/Getty Images

Abortion decision cherry-picks history – when the US Constitution was ratified, women had much more autonomy over abortion decisions than during 19th century

A scholar of 18th-century America and the founders analyzes the Supreme Court opinion overturning the constitutional right to abortion, which he says relies on an incomplete version of US history.
Supreme Court of Canada Chief Justice Richard Wagner waits to pose for a group photo with other members of the Supreme Court on the steps of the building following a welcoming ceremony for Judge Mahmud Jamal in October 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Why Canada’s Supreme Court isn’t likely to go rogue like its U.S. counterpart

Decision-making in the Canadian Supreme Court appears to be more fundamentally rooted in the law, not politics, than it is in the United States. Here’s why.

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