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Articles on Women in politics

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A new book questions Carrie Johnson’s influence over her husband. But is his behaviour her responsibility? Benjamin Wareing/Alamy

Carrie Johnson and our lasting unease about the ‘political spouse’

Whether Boris Johnson’s wife did something wrong can be debated – but placing her at the centre of the ‘partygate’ story is to let the Prime Minister off the hook.
As they grow older, girls increasingly see political leadership as a “man’s world.” Bos, Angie et al

Girls learn early that they don’t have much of a place in politics

As young children learn about politics and political figures, they internalize the idea that politics is a man’s world, which ultimately means political representation is heavily skewed toward men.
From 2001 to 2020, female donors accounted for 23% of all general election contributions in statewide races while men accounted for 77%. Mykola Sosiukin / EyeEm via GettyImages

Women make fewer political donations and risk being ignored by elected officials

Men give more money than women to candidates in high-level statewide elections. Money can equal political influence, so that may lead candidates to be less interested in women’s issues once elected.
Leaders can make rules in a pandemic, but it takes everyone’s compliance for them to work. Ada daSilva via Getty Images

Culture matters a lot in successfully managing a pandemic - and many countries that did well had one thing in common

A new study finds egalitarian nations have had fewer COVID-19 deaths than individualistic ones like the US, a new study finds. But women’s leadership may have something to do with their success, too.
The principles of diversity, equity and inclusivity are important, and taking action so that Canadian politics are not dominated by one segment of society is necessary to democratize our institutions. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Make way! Creating space for change in Canadian politics

If we are to transform the culture of Canadian political institutions, we must take immediate, deliberate and intentional action by engaging more women, BIPOC and marginalized people.
Joe Biden has more top advisers who are women than any other U.S. president. They include Vice President Kamala Harris and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Biden’s Cabinet of many women shows other world leaders that US takes gender equality seriously

Research shows that when one country – particularly a powerful one – puts more women in power, other nations tend to follow suit.
Anti-coup protesters flash the three-fingered salute during a rally in downtown Yangon, Myanmar on Feb. 19, 2021. (AP Photo)

The exclusion of women in Myanmar politics helped fuel the military coup

Despite having a woman leader, women are largely excluded from key positions of influence and leadership in Myanmar — a situation that helped the country’s military succeed in its recent coup.
United States Vice-President-elect Kamala Harris speaks on Nov. 24, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The world needs more women leaders — during COVID-19 and beyond

Gender parity leads to collaboration and a blending of visions, and paves the way for the adoption of more comprehensive and inclusive solutions than if they’re conceived from only one perspective.
The coronavirus pandemic has increased the prominence of women’s voices in the media. Minister of Agriculture Marie-Claude Bibeau and Chief Public Health Officer of Canada Dr. Theresa Tam take part in a videoconference on July 31, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

The coronavirus pandemic increased the visibility of women in the media, but it’s not all good news

More women are making appearances in the news media, and this is due to the coronavirus pandemic. This is not all good news: women are interviewed about the effects of the pandemic on their lives.
Art featuring the slain Rio politician Marielle Franco, whose 2018 murder remains unsolved. Carl de Souza/AFP via Getty Images

‘My vote will be Black’ – A wave of Afro-Brazilian women ran for office in 2020 but found glass ceiling hard to break

The 2018 murder of Rio city councilwoman Marielle Franco inspired record numbers of Black women to get involved in politics. Winning proved harder – but it isn’t the only point of their campaigns.
Congress had very few women members back in 1960, and just one woman of color: Representative Patsy Mink of Hawaii. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

Patsy Takemoto Mink blazed the trail for Kamala Harris – not famous white woman Susan B. Anthony

Mink, the first woman of color in Congress, brought a racially and historically aware brand of feminism into lawmaking and ran for president in 1972. But women’s history largely overlooks her.

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