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Articles on First Amendment

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James O'Keefe at the National Press Club announces an undercover investigation into Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign staff in 2015. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Project Veritas and the mainstream media: Strange allies in the fight to protect press freedom

The mainstream media are holding their collective noses and supporting Project Veritas after its founder’s home was raided by the FBI. It’s a matter of principle and self-preservation.
Two women hold mock pro-life signs in what they call an ‘Abortrait room’ at the Satanic Temple’s headquarters to protest abortion laws. Joseph Prezioso / AFP via Getty images

How the Satanic Temple is using ‘abortion rituals’ to claim religious liberty against the Texas’ ‘heartbeat bill’

The Satanic Temple, a nontheistic group, is invoking the Religious Freedom Restoration Act to challenge Texas’ new anti-abortion law.
Domestic extremists were involved in the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. AP Photo/John Minchillo

Why is it so difficult to fight domestic terrorism? 6 experts share their thoughts

Addressing American domestic radicalism will require new ways of thinking about the nation’s problems, and new ways of solving them.
The Richardson Independent School District in Texas is among the many districts across the state defying the governor’s mask mandate ban to require masks for students. AP Photo/LM Otero

Who has the power to say kids do or don’t have to wear masks in school – the governor or the school district? It’s not clear

If it sounds like the law is all over the place on school mask mandates, that’s because it is. The nation’s schools are subject to a complex web of local, state and federal laws.
Democrats and Republicans in Congress have asked sharp questions of social media CEOs as lawmakers consider changes to landmark internet legislation. Michael Reynolds/Pool via AP

What is Section 230? An expert on internet law and regulation explains the legislation that paved the way for Facebook, Google and Twitter

A terse piece of legislation from 1996 has been credited with creating the internet as we know it – and blamed for the flood of misinformation and other ills that have come with it.
Republican politicians have championed legislation to limit the teaching of material exploring how race and racism influence American politics, culture and law. AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File

Lawsuits over bans on teaching critical race theory are coming – here’s what won’t work, and what might

New state laws in the US banning teaching about systemic racism raise the question: Does the Constitution protect public school teachers’ right to choose how and what to teach?
Donald Trump at a press conference to announce a class action lawsuit against Facebook, Twitter, Google and their CEOs. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Trump can’t beat Facebook, Twitter and YouTube in court – but the fight might be worth more than a win

Former President Trump is asking the courts to do what tycoon Trump once would have denounced: tell some of America’s most powerful corporations that they have no choice who they do business with.
Illuminating recent Supreme Court rulings. Geoff Livingston via Getty Images

Religion at the Supreme Court: 3 essential reads

Religion was a common theme in some of the cases to come before the nine justices in the recently concluded Supreme Court term. Three experts help explain what is at stake.
A Supreme Court ruling on free speech does nothing about toxic online discourse. Francesco Carta fotografo/Moment via Getty Images

Free-speech ruling won’t help declining civil discourse

A Supreme Court ruling about a student’s free-speech rights won’t stem the torrent of crude, disrespectful speech in American society.
Eugene Debs, at center with flowers, who was serving a prison sentence for violating the Espionage Act, on the day he was notified of his nomination for the presidency on the socialist ticket by a delegation of leading socialists. George Rinhard/Corbis Historical/Getty Images

Free speech wasn’t so free 103 years ago, when ‘seditious’ and ‘unpatriotic’ speech was criminalized in the US

Free speech is a long American tradition – but so are attempts to restrict free speech. A First Amendment scholar writes about measures a century ago to silence those criticizing government.

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