Articles sur Medical research

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Around 5% of adults and 90% of babies who contract hepatitis B go on to have life-long infection that can only be managed with regular medication. Ronald Rampsch/Shutterstock

We have a vaccine for hepatitis B but here’s why we still need a cure

Babies in Australia have been vaccinated against hepatitis B since May 2000, but 240,000 Australians still live with the disease.
Industry funders can go to great lengths to suppress the findings of academic research when it’s not favourable to the company. from shutterstock.com

When big companies fund academic research, the truth often comes last

Most medical research is funded by industry, not public sources. And industry puts pressure on researchers in many ways, from guiding the research question to suppressing unfavourable findings.
Low blood pressure may cause problems for many older people. Satyrenko/Shutterstock.com

Low blood pressure could be a culprit in dementia, studies suggest

Researchers are looking for ways to determine who's most at risk for dementia and also ways to detect it early. A scientist who has studied low blood pressure makes a case for a link between the two.
Taking the pill as a teenager may lead to an increased risk for depression, even years after stopping. Shutterstock

Taking the pill as a teenager may have long-lasting effect on depression risk

Long-term or historical use of oral contraceptives may lead to an increased risk of depression in later years; understanding the risk will better inform the decision whether or not to take the pill.
Human challenge studies can be useful to test new vaccines and are increasingly being used internationally. Yet there are several ethical issues to consider. from www.shutterstock.com

Infecting healthy people in vaccine research can be ethical and necessary

Deliberately infecting people with a disease-causing agent as part of carefully considered medical research can be ethically acceptable or even necessary.
Nazi leadership saw medical and pharmaceutical research as a front-line tool to contribute to the war effort. Akanbatt / Pixabay

When science is put in the service of evil

Medical research has a dark history of human experimentation in Nazi Germany. And we're still uncovering the extent of the horrors.
Scientific pursuits need to be coupled with a humanist tradition — to highlight not just how psychedelics work, but why that matters. (Shutterstock)

The real promise of LSD, MDMA and mushrooms for medical science

Once associated with mind-control experiments and counter-cultural defiance, psychedelics now show great promise for mental health treatments and may prompt a re-evaluation of the scientific method.
In the medical culture of the Bugis and Makassar peoples in Indonesia the word koroq means that the penis is actually shrinking, or retracting, but the Dutch in the 19th-century East Indies did not believe it was real. shutterstock

Is shrinking penis syndrome a delusion or a real thing?

Koro is widely believed to be a culturally localised delusion. But a theory that it's a fight-or-flight reflex might be corroborated by studying traditional healing treatments in Indonesia.

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