Articles on Antibiotic resistance

Displaying 1 - 20 of 89 articles

Bacteria in the dish on the left are sensitive to antibiotics in the paper discs. The ones on the right are resistant to four of the seven antibiotics. Dr. Graham Beards

Bacteria may be powerful weapon against antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic-munching microbes may prove useful for mopping up contaminated water supplies and land.
Research shows potential for delivering our drugs in ways that would make it harder for antibiotic resistance to evolve and spread. Here we see a close up view of a biofilm of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (Shutterstock)

‘Drug sanctuaries’ offer hope for a post-antibiotic world

As a post-antibiotic future beckons, how can humanity protect itself against the proliferation of superbugs? Research suggests 'drug sanctuaries' in hospitals could be a promising solution.
New Zealand researchers have found that the active ingredients in commonly-used weed killers like Round-up and Kamba can cause bacteria to become less susceptible to antibiotics. from www.shutterstock.com

New research suggests common herbicides are linked to antibiotic resistance

Improper use of antibiotics is one reason for the rise in antibiotic resistance, but new research shows that ingredients in common weed killers can also cause bacteria to become less susceptible.
Some patients may be prescribed antibiotics as preventatives, rather than to treat infections. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Drug resistance: how we keep track of whether antibiotics are being used responsibly

We know overuse and inappropriate use of antibiotics contribute to resistance, so it's important we develop strategies to improve practice.
John Gerrard says a developed city like Sydney could not cope with an epidemic of the scale of the recent Ebola outbreak. UNMEER/Martine Perret/Flickr

Speaking with: John Gerrard on preventing infectious diseases

Speaking with: Dr. John Gerrard on infectious diseases. The Conversation, CC BY-ND23.2 MB (download)
William Isdale speaks to Dr. John Gerrard about the constant threat of infectious diseases and what we can do to prevent a deadly pandemic from establishing itself in Australia.
Green colonies of allergenic fungus Penicillium from air spores on a petri dish. Penicillin was the first antibiotic. Satirus/Shutterstock.com

Why you may not need all those days of antibiotics

We've been told for a long time that we must take all of our antibiotics. But maybe we didn’t need so many to begin with. Here's why.
Young people are disproportionately affected by sexually transmitted infections, but they face several barriers to getting tested. from www.shutterstock.com

Stigma and lack of awareness stop young people testing for sexually transmitted infections

Despite significant medical advances, rates of sexually transmitted infections are on the rise, including some old foes like syphilis.

Top contributors

More