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Articles on Heat

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The health impact of wildfire exposure depends in part on the fire itself and how much smoke a person breathes in, how often and for how long. AP Photos/Noah Berger

What’s in wildfire smoke, and why is it so bad for your lungs?

Wildfires blanketing several Western cities are creating hazardous health conditions. Don't count on cloth masks to protect your lungs.
People should be able to recognize dangerous high temperatures to avoid illness or death from heat. AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

How dangerous heat waves can kill

Heat waves can kill via dehydration caused by heavy sweating. Breathing or heartbeat may suddenly stop. Prolonged overheating can also create widespread inflammation.
This Arctic heat wave has been unusually long-lived. The darkest reds on this map of the Arctic are areas that were more than 14 degrees Fahrenheit warmer in the spring of 2020 compared to the recent 15-year average. Joshua Stevens/NASA Earth Observatory

100 degrees in Siberia? 5 ways the extreme Arctic heat wave follows a disturbing pattern

The Arctic is warming about twice as fast as the planet as a whole, with serious consequences. Scientists have been warning about this for decades.
Much of India experiences both extreme heat and extreme air pollution, as seen in this photo of the Akshardham Hindu temple. Days with both are going to increase. Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images

Days with both extreme heat and extreme air pollution are becoming more common – which can’t be a good thing for global health

In South Asia, days with both extreme heat and extreme pollution are expected to increase 175% by 2050. Separately, the health effects are bad; together they will likely be worse.
Heat increases the risk of death, but the question of how much has been a topic of debate. From shutterstock.com

Heat kills. We need consistency in the way we measure these deaths

A warming climate leads to more heat-related deaths. The fact some research is showing the opposite indicates we need to refine the way we measure heat-related mortality.
Even without air conditioning, there are still many things you can do to prepare for extreme heat and stay comfortable on hot days. fizkes/Shutterstock

How to cope with extreme heat days without racking up the aircon bills

Air conditioning isn't the answer for everyone, especially for residents of the less affluent – and often hotter – suburbs of our big cities. But there are other ways to make hot days more bearable.
The first half of 2019 is the equal hottest on record and summer is set to be a scorcher. Chayathorn Lertpanyaroj/Shutterstock

How rising temperatures affect our health

Average temperatures in Australia are already high by international standards, but what happens when they continue to rise? How much heat can our bodies withstand?
During a heatwave in late 2018, Cairns temperatures topped 35°C nine days in a row and sensors at some points in the CBD recorded 45°C.

Urban growth, heat islands, humidity, climate change: the costs multiply in tropical cities

The world's fastest-growing cities are in the tropics. They are highly exposed to climate change, especially as urban heat island effects and humidity magnify the impacts of increasing heatwaves.
Green roofs, like this one in Sao Paulo, Brazil, have many benefits. Leonardo Ikeda/Shutterstock

How buildings in Johannesburg could benefit from green roofs

South Africa needs to develop low-cost housing solutions that are inherently comfortable and environmentally sustainable. Green roofs could be part of these solutions.
Climate change, together with other ecological pressures, may well undo the gains we have made in health. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: will we be less healthy because of climate change?

Do you have a question about climate change? This collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre gives you the chance to ask – and we'll provide expert answers.

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