Menu Close

Articles on Malaria

Displaying 1 - 20 of 211 articles

Blood feeding female malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis. University of Pretoria Institute for Sustainable Malaria Control

Malaria elimination in southern Africa? Possibly, but these gaps need attention

The countries share related populations, economies, ecologies and epidemiologies. This interconnectedness highlights challenges and opportunities for more effective malaria control across the region.
South Africa offers free malaria testing and treatment to anyone entering the country along shared borders. Jaishree Raman

The seven steps South Africa is taking to get it closer to eliminating malaria

The South African Malaria Control Programme is one of the few on the continent that is entirely funded by government. The stable source of funding has allowed for steady malaria control interventions.
David Julius, one of the two recipients of the 2021 medicine Nobel Prize, used the active component in chile peppers to study how the brain senses heat. Anton Eine/EyeEm via Getty Images

The 2021 Nobel Prize for medicine helps unravel mysteries about how the body senses temperature and pressure

The joint award recognizes the long road to deciphering the biology behind the brain’s ability to sense its surroundings – work that paves the way for a number of medical and biological breakthroughs.
The Aedes mosquito can transmit several viruses including dengue, yellow fever and Zika. Joao Paulo Burini/GettyImages

Three things you should know about mosquitoes

Mosquitoes are among the deadliest animals in the world. Half of the deaths attributed to them are associated with malaria. But they carry other parasites and viruses that threaten human health.
South African President Cyril Ramaphosa, Deputy president David Mabuza, Health Minister Dr Zweli Mkhize visiting the Aspen Pharmacare sterile manufacturing facility. Lulama Zenzile/Die Burger/Gallo Images via Getty Images

Why Africa’s push to make vaccines should look further than COVID-19

Vaccine manufacturing doesn’t come cheap. It depends heavily on support from developed countries. It also requires much more than relaxing intellectual property rights and a desire for vaccine equity.
Our ancestors’ environment and diets, and the limits of our biology, have led to adaptations that have improved human survival through natural selection. But we remain prone to illness and disease anyway. (Shutterstock)

Evolutionary medicine looks to our early human ancestors for insight into conditions like diabetes

Evolutionary medicine uses our ancestral history to explain disease prevalence and inform care for conditions like Type 2 diabetes. It also challenges the bio-ethnocentrism of western medicine.

Top contributors

More