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Articles on Science communication

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Public service announcements, news articles and social media posts are all part of the coronavirus messaging landscape. Noam Galai via Getty Images

COVID-19 public health messages have been all over the place – but researchers know how to do better

During the pandemic, clear and reliable health communication can literally be a life-and-death issue. Researchers who focus on the science of science communication highlight strategies that work.
How can more scientists learn to communicate like Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases? Anna Moneymaker / POOL / AFP via Getty Images

Scientists need to become better communicators, but it’s hard to measure whether training works

#Scicomm is a hashtag, and there are many programs that claim to teach scientists how to be better communicators. But it's hard to show exactly what they're accomplishing.
If what you’re reading seems too good to be true, it just might be. Mark Hang Fung So/Unsplash

6 tips to help you detect fake science news

Whenever you hear about a new bit of science news, these suggestions will help you assess whether it's more fact or fiction.
A wall relief from the British Museum shows three scribes amid a military campaign of the Assyrian king Tiglath-pileser III, in Babylonia (Iraq). WikiCommons

3 reasons to study science communication beyond the West

All cultures have communicated their knowledge in diverse and marvellous ways throughout time. Failing to see the significance of this is racist and lazy.
Teaching researchers and scientists communication skills — including social media proficiency — will help inform the public about new discoveries and research. (Shutterstock)

Scientists: Here’s how to fight back against anti-maskers, climate deniers and anti-vaxxers

Budget cuts and outsourcing content have affected the amount and quality of science journalism. Scientists should learn to communicate their own findings directly and clearly to the public.
People lose faith in science when it takes a political side. AP Photo/Wong Maye-E

When scientific journals take sides during an election, the public’s trust in science takes a hit

When the scientific establishment gets involved in partisan politics, surveys suggest, there are unintended consequences – especially for conservatives.
Important, accurate messages delivered by the right people at the right time are crucial in a pandemic. Ziyaad Douglas/Gallo Images via Getty Images

Three key drivers of good messaging in a time of crisis: expertise, empathy and timing

For science communicators to be effective, best practice principles need to be applied to the design of messages, the choice of who conveys those messages, and their tone and timing.

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