Articles sur Mexico

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A newly built power generation plant is seen near Huexca, Mexico, in February 2020. The power plant is part of a mega-energy project that includes a natural gas pipeline that traverses three states. AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo

TC Energy’s name change: Rebooting Canadian pipeline empires

The behaviour of TC Energy, the company formerly known as TransCanada, in Wet'suwet'en resulted in a nationwide crisis in Canada. It should not be repeated in Mexico.
Undocumented migrants climb on a train known as ‘La Bestia’ in Las Patronas town, Veracruz state, Mexico, Aug. 9, 2018, to travel through Mexico and reach the U.S. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP via Getty Images

Migrants at US-Mexico border must get past cartels before their long journey ends

The US may be in sight from the border towns of Sonora, Mexico, but the trip is far from over. Cartels control the desert territory that divides the two countries – and no one gets through for free.
Women in Delhi’s Shaheen Bagh neighborhood are protesting a new Indian citizenship law that they say will discriminate against Muslims, women – and, particularly, Muslim women. Burhaan Kinu/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Indian women protest new citizenship laws, joining a global ‘fourth wave’ feminist movement

A round-the-clock strike of Muslim women in a working-class neighborhood of Delhi is India's most enduring pocket of resistance to religious discrimination, inequality and gender violence.
More than 35,000 people were killed in Mexico in 2019, the deadliest year on record. Violence has spiked as a result of the government’s ongoing assault on drug cartels. Leonardo Emiliozzi Ph / Shutterstock

Inside Mexico’s war on drugs: Conversations with ‘el narco’

A researcher who fled crime-beset Mexico returns to interview the drug cartels behind so much of the violence, asking 33 'narcos' everything about their lives, from birth to their latest murder.
A Congolese family approaches the unofficial border crossing with Canada while walking down Roxham Road in Champlain, N.Y., in August 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Charles Krupa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Charles Krupa

Refugee stories reveal anxieties about the Canada-U.S. border

Canadian leaders have desperately tried to preserve the country's image of liberal humanitarianism at our border, but the reality is Canada's immigration history is built upon exclusion.
The countryside around Ciudad Cuauhtemoc, in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua, is home to the country’s largest Mennonite population. AP Photo/Gregory Bull

Mexican Mennonites combat fears of violence with a new Christmas tradition

Chronic violence was dampening the holiday spirit in Chihuahua, Mexico. So the Mennonite community planned a 'Parade of Lights' and holiday party where neighbors could celebrate safely even at night.
Clouds of smoke from burning cars mark the skyline of Culiacan, Mexico, during a 12-hour siege by the Sinaloa Cartel, Oct. 17, 2019. AP Photo/Hector Parra

Cartel sieges leave Mexicans wondering if criminals run the country

A series of brazen, highly visible attacks by Mexican drug cartels have killed at least 50 people in the past month, terrorizing citizens and making the government look weak on crime.
Revelers dressed as Catrina, an iconic Day of the Dead skeleton, at a holiday parade in Mexico City, Oct. 21, 2018. Reuters/Andres Stapff

Day of the Dead: From Aztec goddess worship to modern Mexican celebration

It may sound like a solemn affair, but the Day of the Dead – which blends indigenous and Catholic ritual – is a convivial celebration that allows Mexicans to reconnect with deceased loved ones.
In Mexico, more than half of workers in the industrial and non-agricultural services sectors do not have access to social security. Lunamarina / Shutterstock

Human rights: the indirect impact of multinationals in emerging countries

Multinational corporations are increasingly vigilant about respecting human rights, but the case of Mexico tells us that they can indirectly encourage violations by local businesses.
A soldier participates in a training during a tactical leader’s exercise at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

America now solves problems with troops, not diplomats

Data show that the US intervenes more in other countries' affairs than it did in the past. It also currently hires fewer career professionals for ambassadorial or foreign affairs positions.

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