Articles on Animals

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Southpaws seem to be more common among cats and dogs than humans. Eric Isselee/Shutterstock.com

I’ve always wondered: can animals be left- and right-pawed?

The animal kingdom is full of lefties and righties, although rarely is the ratio skewed as much as it is in humans. If you're wondering about your own pet, you can find out with a simple experiment.
Bees usually get nectar from flowers, but sometimes they steal it from the nests of other bees. Flickr/Michael Cheng

Curious Kids: Do bees ever accidentally sting other bees?

Bees sting other animals, including humans, when they think there might be a threat to their hive. But Evie, age 8, wonders if bees ever accidentally sting other bees.
Isiah Courtney carries his dog Bruce through flood waters from Tropical Storm Harvey in Beaumont Place, Houston, Texas, U.S., on August 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman

Seven ways to protect your pets in an emergency

In the wake of natural disasters, pets are be stranded, lost or abandoned. There are simple guidelines that can help keep your whole family safe.
The return of European brown bears to the Alps means that humans must learn about cohabitation. Alexas Fotos/Pixabay

How to live with bears

Bear-man conflicts have made news in the Alps but history tells a story of a possible cohabitation.
Monarch caterpillars feeding on milkweed leaves and dropping their faces (taken in the laboratory facility). Prayan Pokharel

The hidden secrets of insect poop

Bugs use their own defecation to defend their young, locate their homes and increase mating opportunities. For humans, insect faeces may even have untapped medicinal properties.
If frogs can glow in the dark and cockroaches can change history, why couldn’t dog-birds exist? Chris Goldberg / flickr

Global series: Wild world

A collection of The Conversation Global's best articles on animals, from glow-in-the-dark frogs to the wood beetles that do humanity's dirty work.
A beached hoodwinker sunfish, the new species described by researchers from Murdoch University. Murdoch University

The four-year treasure hunt for the hoodwinker sunfish

A four-year puzzle has ended with the discovery of a new species of sunfish. These famously strange-looking animals are the largest bony fish in the oceans.
Nearly one-third of tropical animal species face extinction if humans do not curb our growing appetites for beef, pork and other land-intensive meats. The Panamanian golden frog bred by the Vancouver Aquarium in this 2014 file photo may be extinct in its natural habitat. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

How changing your diet could save animals from extinction

As much as one-third of animal species in the tropics could be eradicated if their habitats continue to be converted for monoculture farming. We can all do something to make a difference.
Tabatha Bundesen’s pet Tardar Sauce became an Internet sensation known as “Grumpy Cat” for a resting facial appearance that resembles a look of dissatisfaction. Now, scientists are starting to be able to read animal emotions from their expressions. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

Animal emotions stare us in the face — are our pets happy?

Scientists are beginning to link animal facial expressions to emotions, making it possible for us to understand how they feel.
It can be easier to raise money to aid animals like these African elephants than species that are more threatened with extinction but get humans less excited. www.shutterstock.com

Even ugly animals can win hearts and dollars to save them from extinction

Must the money raised to save wildlife always aid the most popular animals? New research suggests that marketing can persuade donors that northern hairy-nosed wombat lives matter too.
A pair of rare sea snakes, thought to be extinct, sighted off Western Australia’s mid-north coast in 2015. Our stunning range of serpents inspire fear, but is that fair? AAP Image/WA Parks and Wildlife/Grant Griffin

A venomous paradox: how deadly are Australia’s snakes?

For over a century Australia’s venomous snakes have been counted amongst the world’s deadliest, yet human fatalities remain strikingly rare. How did our snakes develop such a fearsome reputation?

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