Articles on Chronic pain

Displaying 1 - 20 of 49 articles

Pain lets us know when there is something wrong, but sometimes our brains can trick us. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Trust Me I’m An Expert: The science of pain

Trust Me I’m An Expert: The science of pain. The Conversation58.7 MB (download)
Our podcast Trust Me, I'm An Expert, goes beyond the headlines and asks researchers to explain the evidence on issues making news. Today, we're talking pain and what science says about managing it.
shutterstock.com

Anthill 19: Pain

Pain is something everyone experiences. This episode of The Anthill podcast explores how and why it works in our brains, what kinds of drugs are being developed to reduce pain, and whether or not robots of the future should be built so that they experience pain.
There is growing evidence for the use of cannabis in treating opioid addiction. (Shutterstock)

Legal weed: An accidental solution to the opioid crisis?

As Canada moves towards legalization of cannabis in 2018, there is growing evidence of the drug's potential to treat opioid addiction itself, as well as the chronic pain that often drives it.
Our brains tell our bodies to move differently when we have pain. from shutterstock.com

Can the way we move after injury lead to chronic pain?

Our brains tell our bodies to move differently when we have pain. And there is emerging evidence to show changing how we move could actually contribute to the development of chronic pain.
More young Australians face the daunting task of trying to live a ‘normal’ life while dealing with the after-effects of cancer. Greg Raines/Unsplash

Life interrupted: young people need help moving forward after cancer

If you’re an Australian teenager or young adult diagnosed with cancer, there’s good news: overall survival rates are good and getting better. But what can you expect from life after cancer treatment?
Vulvodynia can be brutal and is commonly described as stabbing, burning, cutting or knife-like pain. from shutterstock.com

Does your vulva hurt? You could have vulvodynia

If you've ever experienced pain in your vulva, you're not alone. Around 16% of women will have vulvar pain that lasts for longer than three months. They are likely suffering from vulvodynia.
Neuropathic pain often doesn’t respond to common painkillers such as ibuprofen or paracetamol. from shutterstock.com

Weekly dose: Lyrica, the epilepsy drug that treats chronic nerve pain

Lyrica, the brand name for a medicine called pregabalin, is an anti-epileptic drug most commonly used to treat chronic nerve pain - a type of pain caused by abnormality in, or damage to, the nerves.

Top contributors

More