Articles on Genetics

Displaying 1 - 20 of 432 articles

Children grow up to look somewhat like their parents. Flickr/d26b73

Curious Kids: Why do people grow to certain sizes?

Every human carries an instruction booklet with a very special code, called DNA. Our eyes cannot read the code, but our bodies can. The code tells our body what to do and how to look.
Eighty years ago, Seabiscuit trounced Triple Crown winner War Admiral. AP Photo

Can Seabiscuit’s DNA explain his elite racing ability?

The US went crazy for Seabiscuit when he won his famous 1938 match race against War Admiral. Now researchers are investigating the thoroughbred's DNA to see what made him such an unlikely success.
People exposed to low levels of sunlight are more likely to have MS than those who live in warm climates. chuttersnap

What causes multiple sclerosis? What we know, don’t know and suspect

Young women are disproportionately affected by multiple sclerosis, a disease where the body attacks the brain, scrambling communication to the rest of the body. Here's what we know about the causes.
Some Harlequin ladybugs, Harmonia axyridis, have black elytra with two large red spots. Others have two additional red spots backwards, or are decorated with a dozen small red spots. Conversely, there are ladybugs with red elytra, decorated with 20 black spots. All these ladybugs belong to the same species. B. Prud’homme, J. Yamaguchi

In red and black, the genetics of ladybug spots

Where do the pretty colours of the harlequin ladybug come from? A single gene draws the colour patterns of this familiar insect.
A three-banded clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris) navigates the anemones of the Andaman Coral Reef, India. Ritiks/Wikipedia

Why does Nemo the clownfish have three white stripes? The riddle solved at last

Our children all know the little clownfish Nemo, star of the Pixar film. But why does he have three stripes, rather than one or two? Developmental and evolutionary biology are revealing the answer.
Synthetic biology has the potential to change how we do agriculture – but will the public accept it? from www.shutterstock.com

A fresh opportunity to get regulation and engagement right – the case of synthetic biology

Synthetic biology is highly promising – but if we don't get the regulation and engagement right, we risk alienating members of the public, and may even close doors for potentially fruitful research.

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