Articles on Homo erectus

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A prehistoric hand-held multipurpose stone tool the size of a person’s palm recovered by a farmer in Kenya. More tools were found during a search. Stephen Thompson

Kenyan farmer’s unique rock find uncovers new prehistoric clues

Scientists are hoping that ancient stone tools found on a family farm in Kenya will add to a clearer picture of the first appearance, duration and variation of prehistoric technologies found so far.
A 700,000 year-old stone tool excavated by an Indonesian field worker at Mata Menge, Flores. Yinika Perston

How the Hobbits kept their tools as they shrank into island life

New fossil finds show the first large-bodied inhabitants of an isolated Indonesian island evolved to Hobbit-size, but they always remembered how to make and use stone tools.
Professor Lee Berger from the University of the Witwatersrand holding the skull of Homo Naledi. EPA/Shiraaz Mohamed

Homo naledi may be two million years old (give or take)

The big question being asked is: where does Homo naledi fit in the evolutionary tree? Assessing the similarity or dissimilarity between fossil skulls has provided a possible clue to the answer.
Scientific evidence shows overwhelmingly that people across the world are genetic refugees from Africa. Shutterstock

How science has been abused through the ages to promote racism

Despite science refuting the existence of different human races, people have used "race" throughout history to divide and denigrate certain people while promoting their claims of superiority.
The skull of Homo naledi is built like those of early Homo species but its brain was just more than half the size of the average ancestor from 2 million years ago. SUPPLIED

Homo naledi: determining the age of fossils is not an exact science

Despite claims about its age, puzzling combinations of features from Homo naledi gives it an uncanny resemblance to human beings.
For millennia, humans have had the tools to change the atmosphere: when will we develop a sense of caution? AK Rockefeller/Flickr

Human global domination began with fire, not factories or farms

The era in which humans have had the power to alter the conditions for all life on Earth is widely thought to have begun with the Industrial Revolution 250 years ago. This era has been dubbed the “Anthropocene…

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