Articles on ISIS

Displaying 1 - 20 of 135 articles

Iraqi soldiers gather near the remains of wall panels and colossal statues of winged bulls that were destroyed by Islamic State militants in the Assyrian city of Nimrud, late last year. Ari Jalal/Reuters

Erasing history: why Islamic State is blowing up ancient artefacts

Islamic State has destroyed globally-significant sites in Iraq and Syria, but not as wanton acts of destruction. Instead, they are calculated political and religious attacks.
Breathless reporting accompanies each attack, with little time spent addressing the underlying causes. Nick Lehr/The Conversation via Google

Mainstream media outlets are dropping the ball with terrorism coverage

Terrorist attacks are more than 'breaking news,' but the media aren't taking a comprehensive approach to exploring the underlying issues.
Tunisians demonstrate against the return of jihadists fighting for extremist groups abroad Reuters/Zoubeir Souissi

Integrating radical fighters who return home isn’t easy, but can be done

Trying to reintegrate foreign fighters who return home shouldn't be considered the soft option. Governments in countries like Morocco and Tunisia need to respond realistically to a complex problem.
A woman holds a flag as she looks out over the National Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Threats of violent Islamist and far-right extremism: What does the research say?

Data on violent incidents in the US reveal that our focus on Islamist extremism since 9/11 may be misguided.
Both sea ice and government data are disappearing. U.S. Geological Survey, flickr

How the ‘guerrilla archivists’ saved history – and are doing it again under Trump

Activists today are racing to save climate records from the Trump administration. Secret archives were a powerful way to fight hostile political climates throughout history – from the Nazis to the Islamic State.
On his way to the White House, Jan. 20, 2017. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

NATO’s future when America comes first

Is Trump correct in asserting that NATO has outlived its utility? Or that NATO’s members enjoy a 'free ride' on the back of the US? A political scientist examines the evidence.
The 1,200 year old Umayyad Mosque – also known as the Great Mosque of Aleppo – lost its minaret (on left) in 2013 after continued heavy gunfire between rebels and Syrian government forces. Reuters

Friday essay: war crimes and the many threats to cultural heritage

It is important to prosecute militants who destroy antiquities. But 'everyday' development - from dams flooding towns to the impact of mining on Indigenous rock art – does vastly more damage to heritage than war.
ISIS fighters celebrating in Mosul, Iraq, in 2014. Criminological studies suggest terrorists would use diverse tactics to neutralise feelings of guilt. Reuters

How ISIS terrorists neutralise guilt to justify their atrocities

Do ISIS fighters feel guilty about the violence they perpetrate? Not likely, according to criminological research, which suggests terrorists "neutralise" their guilt, just as many other criminals do.

Top contributors

More