Articles on Barack Obama

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Former Nigerian finance minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala is eminently qualified to lead the World Bank. EFE-EPA/EPA/Gian Ehrenzeller

The World Bank needs deep reforms to reflect a changing world order

The World Bank needs to change as part of rethinking the current world order, and giving rising powers and developing countries a meaningful voice.
Educators can use story-telling to make students more politically aware. Rido/Shutterstock.com

Teaching hope during the 2020 campaign season

Election campaigns inspire hope, but they can also quickly lead to political despair. A scholar says young citizens can learn how to take positive action and stay hopeful.
Women earn less than men in most occupations, including soccer. AP Photo/Jessica Hill

Why women still earn a lot less than men

A decade ago, President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, the latest legislative effort to close the persistent gap between how much women and men earn. Here's why it hasn’t made much of a difference.
GOP President Ronald Reagan and Democratic House Speaker Tip O'Neill at the April, 1983 signing of bipartisan social security legislation. AP/Barry Thumma

Congress used to pass bipartisan legislation – will it ever again?

Most Congresses since the 1970s have passed more than 500 laws, ranging from nuclear disarmament to deficit reduction. Will today's bitter partisanship hamstring the new Congress' productivity?
President George H.W. Bush in 1990. Mark Reinstein/www.shutterstock.com

George H.W. Bush laid the foundation for education reform

Though his education initiative staggered while he was in office, the late former President George H.W. Bush had an influence that continues to shape education policy, an education historian says.
Unlike every president who followed him, George H.W. Bush had a background in foreign policy. In 1972, Bush was serving as U.S. ambassador to the U.N. AP Photo/Dave Pickoff

Why we’ll miss George H.W. Bush, America’s last foreign policy president

The first President Bush had some impressive foreign policies wins, but could he be best remembered for getting the US entangled in Iraq?
Supreme Court justices stood with Brett Kavanaugh, his wife Ashley, President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump on the day of Kavanaugh’s investiture. AP/Supreme Court provided

Kavanaugh’s impact on the Supreme Court and the country may not be as profound as predicted

With Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court, many predict that the court will move to the right on issues from abortion to gun rights. But Supreme Court rulings are often not the last word on a matter.
For decades, native-born American Jews changed their names to improve their job prospects. Billion Photos/Shutterstock.com

Why are some Americans changing their names?

The demographics of name change petitioners today – and the reasons that they give – tell a complicated story of race, class and culture.
Images of Donald Trump from the midterm campaign. Illustration by Bob Britten

What image will define the 2018 election?

Here's a riddle: What's the dominant image of the 2018 election campaign? There isn't one. But there are many.
Andrew Gillum with wife R. Jai Gillum addresses supporters after winning the Democrat primary for governor. AP Photo/Steve Cannon

Could Andrew Gillum be the next governor of Florida?

The mayor of Tallahassee underspent three rivals to win the state's Democratic primary. But what awaits in the general election?
A United Nations staff member pays tribute to Kofi Annan during a ceremony at the European headquarters of the UN in Geneva, Switzerland. EPA-EFE/ Salvatore Di Nolfi

Honouring Annan, McCain and others: why eulogies have blind spots

Kofi Annan and John McCain's positive eulogies could be because both men seized moments of human dignity and decency.
In what became one of the defining moments of his unsuccessful 2008 presidential campaign, Republican candidate John McCain takes back the microphone from Gayle Quinnell, who said Barack Obama “was an Arab.” The moment occurred during a town hall meeting on Oct. 10, 2008, in Lakeville, Minn. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

What we can learn from John McCain’s civic vulnerability

John McCain did something during the 2008 U.S. presidential election that would seem very out of place today: he made himself vulnerable by speaking up about the character of opponent Barack Obama.
The U.S. won’t be able to walk all over Putin with unilateral sanctions. Reuters/Sergei Karpukhin

New sanctions on Russia and Iran are unlikely to work. Here’s why

American policymakers and lawmakers are floating unilateral sanctions against Russia, Iran and even Turkey in an effort to change behavior. But research shows sanctions only work in narrow circumstances.

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