David Malet is an Assistant Professor at the School of Public Affairs at American University, where his teaching and research include foreign fighters, terrorism, transnational security, US national security policy, the US Congress and elections, and military use of biotechnology. Previously he served as Director of the Security Policy Studies Program at the George Washington University Elliott School of International Affairs. He also taught at the University of Melbourne, Australia, and at Colorado State University-Pueblo, where he was Director of the Center for the Study of Homeland Security. From 2000-2003 he served as Research Assistant on national security issues to US Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle. He also has worked in the office of US Senator John Kerry, the Attorney General of New South Wales, Australia, and the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs.

Experience

  • 2016–present
    Associate professor, George Washington University
  • 2012–2016
    Senior lecturer, University of Melbourne
  • 2009–2012
    Assistant Professor and Director of the Center for the Study of Homeland Security , Colorado State University
  • 2000–2003
    Research Assistant, US Senator Tom Daschle

Education

  • 2009 
    George Washington University, PhD in Political Science
  • 1999 
    Georgetown University, MA in National Security Studies
  • 1998 
    Boston University, BA in International Relations and Political Science, BS in Education

Publications

  • 2016
    Biotechnology and International Security, Rowman and Littlefield
  • 2015
    Bioterrorism and Local Agency Preparedness: Results from an Experimental Study in Risk Communication, Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management
  • 2015
    Foreign Fighter Mobilization and Persistence in a Global Context, Terrorism and Political Violence
  • 2015
    Captain America in International Relations: The Biotech Revolution in Military Affairs, Defence Studies
  • 2014
    Foreign Fighters Playbook, Foreign Affairs
  • 2014
    Accountability between the Public and Experts in Times of Risk, Australian Journal of Public Administration
  • 2013
    Foreign Fighters, Oxford University Press
  • 2010
    In Afghanistan, Less is More, Small Wars Journal
  • 2009
    Why Foreign Fighters? Historical Perspectives and Solutions, Orbis
  • 2008
    Faith in the System: Conceptualizing Grand Strategy in the Post-9/11 World Order, Studies in Conflict and Terrorism
  • 2007
    Trade Vote Determinants: Partisan Effects of Political Action Committee , Social Science Journal

Grants and Contracts

  • 2011
    Risk Communication Strategies in Biological Decontamination: Using Social Media to Build Trust
    Role:
    Co-Principal Investigator
    Funding Source:
    United States Government

Research Areas

  • Political Science (1606)
  • International Relations (160607)