Articles on Latin America

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Costa Ricans held a march in solidarity with Nicaraguan refugees on Aug. 25, 2018. An estimated 500,000 Nicaraguans live in Costa Rica, with more arriving daily as crisis in the country deepens. Reuters/Juan Carlos Ulate

Migrant money could be keeping Nicaragua’s uprising alive

Nicaraguan migrants send over US$1 billion home each year. This money has played a changing role in domestic politics – first boosting the Ortega regime and, now, sustaining the uprising against him.
Presidential runoff candidates: Jair Bolsonaro, far-right lawmaker of the Social Liberal Party and Fernando Haddad of Brazil’s leftist Workers Party. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes/Washington Alves

‘Disillusioned’ Brazilians choose Bolsonaro, Haddad after a tense and violent campaign

After four years of economic crisis and corruption, Brazilians have never trusted their government less. They showed their frustration Sunday, voting for two ideologically opposed candidates.
Mexican soldiers killed up to 300 student protesters and arrested 1,000 more on Oct. 3, 1968, in an event that’s come to be known as the Tlatelolco massacre. AP Photo

Massacres, disappearances and 1968: Mexicans remember the victims of a ‘perfect dictatorship’

Fifty years ago, soldiers gunned down hundreds of student protesters in a Mexico City plaza. It was neither the first nor the last time Mexico's army would be deployed against its own citizens.
Black women in Brazil protest presidential frontrunner Jair Bolsonaro, who is known for his disparaging remarks about women, on Sept. 29, 2018. AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo

Sexism, racism drive more black women to run for office in both Brazil and US

In Brazil, a record 1,237 black women will stand for office in Sunday's general election. As in the US, their campaigns reflect deep personal concern about rising racism and sexism in politics.
Three years into a protracted political and economic crisis, Venezuela has seen TK million migrants — TK percent of its population — flee. Reuters/Luisa Gonzalez

Refugees from Venezuela are fleeing to Latin American cities, not refugee camps

Up to 5,000 refugees flee hunger and chaos in Venezuela each day – a migrant crisis rivaling Syria's. Most arrive to poor South American border cities that are dangerously unprepared for the influx.
The fertile, mountainous terrain of Colombia’s coffee-producing central region is vulnerable to climate change impacts such as stronger storms and hotter temperatures. Eddy Milfort/flickr

Coffee farmers struggle to adapt to Colombia’s changing climate

Colombia's coffee industry is at risk due to unpredictable seasons, floods, landslides, droughts and pests. Farmers say they want to learn to adapt to these environmental changes but don't know how.
Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez was a major financier of Nicaragua’s Daniel Ortega, seen here at a 2016 commemoration on the third anniversary of the socialist leader’s death. Reuters/Marco Bello

Venezuelan oil fueled the rise and fall of Nicaragua’s Ortega regime

Cheap Venezuelan oil boosted Nicaragua's economy and funded President Daniel Ortega's many anti-poverty programs. With Venezuela in crisis, the oil has dried up – as has support for Ortega's regime.
Argentina’s pro-choice movement, which began in 2003, hopes that the Senate will vote in favor of legalizing abortion on Aug. 8, 2018.

Facing a groundswell of support for legal abortion, Argentina’s Catholic Church moderates its tone

Abortion support is high in Argentina, even among Catholics. That puts the church, which opposes an abortion bill up for vote on August 8, in the awkward position of fighting a law its members demand.
New suicide data indicates that years of record bloodshed in Mexico have traumatized residents in places where the violence is most concentrated. Reuters/Jorge Lopez

Rising suicides in Mexico expose the mental health toll of living with extreme, chronic violence

Ciudad Juárez, on the US-Mexico border, has suffered high levels of deadly violence for over a decade. New suicide data reveals the severe mental health impacts of living with chronic violence.
The wife of Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro reacts to an explosion during a public event, which the regime says was a drone attempting to assassinate the president (Aug. 4, 2018). Venezolana de Television via AP

Drone attack or no, Venezuela’s Maduro regime is probably here to stay

How long can a rogue regime survive assassination attempts, sanctions, bankruptcy, humanitarian crisis and mass unrest? When it comes to Venezuela, President Maduro may cling to power for some time.

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