Articles on Organs

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When you have a wound, your body gets to work straight away to clean it out, kill germs and repair the skin. Shutterstock/Yakobchuk Viacheslav

Curious Kids: how do wounds heal?

The body tries to plug a wound quickly to stop germs getting in through broken skin and making you sick. But behind the scenes, your blood is working hard to repair a wound.
If you have been drinking more water than your body needs, the body tells the kidney filters to get rid of the spare water. That’s when your urine will look paler. Shutterstock

Curious Kids: why is urine yellow?

One of the waste products that your kidneys put into your urine is a chemical called urobilin, and it is yellow.
Fluorescence microscopy image of the newly formed blood vessels after injection of our seaweed-derived hydrogel in a muscle. In green are the blood vessels and in blue the cell nuclei. Aurelien Forget, Roberto Gianni-Barrera, Andrea Banfi and Prasad Shastri

Edible seaweed can be used to grow blood vessels in the body

Small wounds can usually heal by themselves, but larger wounds can be a problem. With a little help from a seaweed we can help the body regenerate new blood vessels.
Society has long treated people with extra limbs as anatomical oddities. But having an extra body part or organ is surprisingly common and many people don’t know they have them. Ddicksson/Wikimedia Commons

An extra organ or body part is more common than you think

Most people don't know if they have a hidden extra organ. But they're surprisingly common and often harmless.

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