Articles on Trans Mountain Pipeline

Displaying all articles

Suncor’s base plant with upgraders in the oil sands in Fort McMurray Alta., June 13, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson)

How post-truth politics is sinking debate on environmental assessment reform

Canada's proposed new environmental assessment law is facing heated, if not necessarily well-informed, opposition. The real question is whether it goes far enough.
A dilapidated house in the northern Ontario First Nation of Attawapiskat is seen in April 2016. The parliamentary budget officer says it will cost more than $3 billion to bring First Nations water infrastructure up to standards seen in comparable non-Indigenous communities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

How Canada can, and must, empower Indigenous communities

If we continue to shut Indigenous communities out of the modern economy, critical infrastructure projects will continue to be delayed and natural resources will remain stuck in the ground.
People hold artwork of various marine life and youth during a rally celebrating a recent federal court ruling against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, in Vancouver, on Sept. 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

No quick or easy resolution to the Trans Mountain pipeline question

Contrary to what some have suggested, the uncertainty over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion will be drawn out.
Protesters opposed to the Trans Mountain pipeline extension demonstrate in Vancouver in June 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Everyone needs to take a deep breath after the Trans Mountain ruling

The ruling against the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline project doesn't mean the end of the oil and gas industry in Canada. Other projects and approaches could go forward.
Coldwater Indian band Chief Lee Spahan raises an eagle feather after responding to a Federal Court of Appeal ruling that put the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion on hold.

Trans Mountain ruling: Victory for environmentalists, but a setback for action on climate change

Environmentalists claimed victory when a court ruling put the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion on hold. But delaying or cancelling the project would also impact Canada's climate change strategy.
A protester opposed to the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is lowered to a police boat after spending two days suspended from a bridge in Vancouver in July 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Lessons from Clayoquot Sound for the Trans Mountain pipeline protests

Based on the success of the Clayoquot Sound protests 25 years ago, we can expect the TransMountain pipeline expansion protest movement, and its related civil disobedience, to continue.
Protesters demonstrate against the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in May 2018 in Vancouver. Building infrastructure is a tricky business for the private and public sector alike. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

The risky business of government-run pipelines

When the Canadian government announced its pending ownership in the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, it entered the complex business of pipeline infrastructure.
A aerial view of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain marine terminal, in Burnaby, B.C., is shown on Tues., May 29, 2018. (Jonathan Hayward/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Canada’s Paris-pipeline paradox

Canada wants to move towards a green economy and meet its Paris Agreement targets, but it has also just taken ownership of a pipeline. How can the federal government deal with this paradox?
People listen during a protest against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion on May 29, 2018. The federal government’s decision to buy the project doesn’t inspire confidence for potential investors eyeing Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

What the Kinder Morgan decision says about investing in Canada

The decision of the Canadian government to purchase the $4.5 billion Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project doesn't exactly instil confidence in Canada's investment climate.
A aerial view of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain tank farm is pictured in Burnaby, B.C. The federal government is buying Trans Mountain and all of Kinder Morgan Canada’s core assets. Opposition to pipeline construction in Canada has transformed over the decades, shifting from being a local issue to one of global concerns. THE CANADIAN PRESS Jonathan Hayward

The complicated history of building pipelines in Canada

Canada has a long history of building energy pipelines against a backdrop of environmental uncertainty. Decades ago, the opposition came from local groups. Now it's a global issue.
A protester holds a photo of an oil-soaked Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during a demonstration against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion in Vancouver on May 29, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Justin Trudeau’s risky gamble on the Trans Mountain pipeline

The Trudeau government's decision to buy the Trans Mountain pipeline from Kinder Morgan is incredibly risky. Here's why.
An Indigenous woman holds a sign as thousands of people attend a protest against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Burnaby, B.C., on March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Alberta’s shameful pipeline politics ignores First Nations

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley is fighting British Columbia's efforts to stop the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. Here's what she's got wrong.
Sockeye salmon need strong hearts to migrate long distances. An oil spill could hurt their survival. (AP Photo/Gary Stewart, File)

The Kinder Morgan pipeline and Pacific salmon: Red fish, black gold

Pacific salmon are ingrained in the culture and economy of Canada. They are also a key link between ocean and land. But what happens if a pipeline failure contaminates their habitat?

Top contributors

More