Articles on White supremacy

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With a new wave of authoritarianism in the United States and beyond, it’s time for universities and colleges to defend democracy. (Shutterstock)

Why universities must defend democracy

The rise of neo-Nazism under President Donald Trump signals a new wave of authoritarianism. Now more than ever, colleges and universities must help students become informed and compassionate citizens.
Online hate isn’t always as easy to spot as it might appear. Lukasz Stefanski/Shutterstock.com

What is the online equivalent of a burning cross?

Two websites, one taken offline, the other still active, raise hard questions about how prepared Americans are to deal with free speech about white supremacy, in both monuments and domain names.
Private companies are policing online hate without independent oversight or regulation, which has serious implications and poses risks for basic human rights and freedoms. (Shutterstock)

Why it’s a mistake to celebrate the crackdown on hate websites

After violence in Charlottesville, internet firms are erasing bigoted content. But should private companies serve as unaccountable regulators and be responsible for policing complex social issues?
A man sporting a Nazi tattoo leaves Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Virginia on Aug. 12, 2017. Steve Helber/AP Photo

Over the years, Americans have become increasingly exposed to extremism

Given recent events, you might have had an inkling that extremist views have been resonating. Researchers from the Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention have the hard data to back it up.
US Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks to law enforcement officers in St. Louis. REUTERS/Lawrence Bryant

How crossing the US-Mexico border became a crime

Trump's administration plans to ramp up prosecution of unauthorized border crossings. Here's the story of how it became illegal in the first place.
From person to person, the spread of online hate can be rapid. Connections via shutterstock.com

How online hate infiltrates social media and politics

Today's radical right is remaking its profile, using online communications to spread its message farther and deeper into our society than ever possible before.
US President Donald Trump stamped his inaugural speech with the promise of ‘America First’ – a slogan with an ominous past. Reuters/Kevin Lamarque

Trump’s ‘America first’ pledge has echoes of Rhodesia’s racist white nationalists

Rhodesia's white supremacists appealed to the white electorate by taking a stand against African liberation. Similarly, Donald Trump appealed to white Americans who feel overwhelmed by globalisation.

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