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Articles on Facial recognition

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Government agencies are increasingly using facial recognition technology, including through security cameras like this one being installed on the Lincoln Memorial in 2019. Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Feds are increasing use of facial recognition systems – despite calls for a moratorium

Politicians of all stripes, computer professionals and even big-tech executives are calling on government to hit the brakes on using these algorithms. The feds are hitting the gas.
A U.S. Army soldier scans the irises of an Afghan civilian in 2012 as part of an effort by the military to collect biometric information from much of the Afghan population. Jose Cabezas/AFP via GettyImages

The Taliban reportedly have control of US biometric devices – a lesson in life-and-death consequences of data privacy

The potential failure of the U.S. military to protect information that can identify Afghan citizens raises questions about whether and how biometric data should be collected in war zones.
Vaccine passports may soon be required for travelling amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Like biometrics, they’ll likely become a permanent part of our daily lives — and there’s barely been any debate about them. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Why we need to seriously reconsider COVID-19 vaccination passports

COVID-19 vaccine passports are being presented as a relatively simple technological solution to our current travel woes. But meaningful public debate about their merits and problems is essential.
Simply making an effort to consider the person behind the mask can help address the biases exacerbated by wearing one. (Shutterstock)

Face masks hide our facial expressions and can exacerbate racial bias

Wearing face masks hides our facial expressions and affects our social interactions. They make it harder for us to read facial expressions and can contribute to racist perceptions.
Many of the people who broke into the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6 carried cellphones, which can be tracked, and posted photos of their activities on social media. Photo by Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

How law enforcement is using technology to track down people who attacked the US Capitol building

Facial recognition, social media and location tracking give law enforcement a leg up in a monumental investigation.
Facial recognition technology raises serious ethical and privacy questions, even as it helps investigators south of the border zero in on the rioters who stormed the U.S. Capitol. (Pixabay)

As U.S. Capitol investigators use facial recognition, it begs the question: Who owns our faces?

We have unwittingly volunteered our faces in social media posts and photos stored in the cloud. But we’ve yet to determine who owns the data associated with the contours of our faces.
Facial recognition algorithms are usually tested using white faces, which results in the technology being unable to differentiate between racialized individuals. (Shutterstock)

AI technologies — like police facial recognition — discriminate against people of colour

Technology is not neutral, as facial recognition algorithms and predictive policing have shown us. Algorithms discriminate by design, reflecting and reinforcing pre-existing biases.

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