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Articles on Literature

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Japanese author Yukio Mishima speaks to Japanese Self-Defense Force soldiers at Tokyo’s military garrison station on Nov. 25, 1970. JIJI PRESS/AFP via Getty Images

Japan’s most famous writer committed suicide after a failed coup attempt – now, new photos add more layers to the haunting act

Like a Rorschach test, the incident offers limitless interpretations. But newly published photographs of Yukio Mishima in his final weeks alive show an artist obsessed with scripting out death.
Harry Potter’s adventures take on a new significance during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. (Shutterstock)

Reading Harry Potter in a new light during the coronavirus pandemic

Rereading Harry Potter during the COVID-19 pandemic means finding new ways of identifying with the characters, especially in the seventh book, where Harry finds himself struggling with isolation.
Increasingly, Americans seem to have irreconcilable differences over the pandemic, the economy – even the result of the 2020 election. Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Ancient Greek desire to resolve civil strife resonates today – but Athenian justice would be a ‘bitter pill’ in modern America

Homer and Aeschylus turned to the divine to write their happy endings. But no gods are conspiring above the US, ready to swoop down and save humankind from itself.
Netflix’s series The Haunting of Hill House was inspired by the book of the same name by Shirley Jackson. Steve Dietl/Netflix

Five haunted house stories to read during lockdown

From ghosts and meddling staff to interesting decorating choices, the houses in these books make for great reading.
Kate Winslet in the 2015 film The Dressmaker. The film was based on the novel by Australian writer Rosalie Ham. Screen Australia, Film Art Media, White Hot Productions

Gail Jones: Australian literature is chronically underfunded — here’s how to help it flourish

Literature funding has been cut brutally in recent years and writers' incomes are disastrously low. Yet books shape our national identity, forming an often invisible bedrock for the wider economy.

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