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Articles on Mental health

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Positive representations of higher-weight women exercising can counter the idealization of thin bodies that is common on social media, while cultivating health-promoting exercise behaviour. (Shutterstock)

Why social media ‘fitspiration’ can fail: Weight-inclusive fitness posts are more likely to motivate young women to exercise

Social media content that positively represents body size, shape and weight diversity may help to address the negative psychological effects of ‘fitspiration’ that depicts narrow body standards.
In this photo from 2016, students pass through a security checkpoint at William Hackett Middle School in Albany, N.Y., with guards, bag inspections and a metal detector. AP Photo/Mike Groll

Does hardening schools make students safer?

Surveillance cameras, metal detectors, door-locking systems and armed guards have not prevented school shootings. A school safety scholar examines other possible approaches.
Support for young internet users needs to come from parents, teachers, governments and the social media industry. Adam and Kev via GettyImages

Children’s mental health and the digital world: how to get the balance right

Understanding the impact of the digital environment on children’s mental health requires a balanced consideration of not only the potential risks, but also the benefits of the online world.
Game jams are powerful spaces for galvanizing creativity in disenfranchised communities. (Shutterstock)

Making video games can help support addiction recovery

Game making is an art form that many aren’t intimately familiar with. Unlike other creative practices, game makers must create the rules and laws that govern and shape player behaviours.
School counselors like Jacquelyn Indrisano, left, can help students feel welcome and safe at school. Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

School mental health resources critical to ensuring safe school environments

School violence prevention requires professionals – counselors, psychologists and social workers – who know how to create an emotionally safe environment. Those staffers are in very short supply.
Kids say they have felt ignored amid policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic that seemed more focused on the fates of restaurants, bars and entertainment venues than keeping schools open and safe. kali9/E+ via Getty Images

Listening to young people could help reduce pandemic-related harms to children

Making room for the input of children and adolescents in responses to the next pandemic would help maintain their health, education, well-being and more.

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