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Articles on Oil and gas

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A pumpjack draws out oil and gas from a well head near Calgary in October 2022. There are thousands of inactive oil and gas wells in the province that have not been properly decommissioned. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Despite soaring profits, oil companies are not paying enough for their environmental damage

The Alberta government is failing to ensure environmental liabilities are adequately accounted for and that progress is being made to address the province’s massive tailings ponds.
A person shops at a supermarket in Moscow in April. War-related sanctions have caused inflation to soar – 2% per week in the first three weeks of the war and 1% per week thereafter, equivalent to 68% per year. Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP

War in Ukraine: Russia’s reputedly ‘sanction proof’ economy shows signs of stress

While the country’s Central Bank may have managed to offset some of the tougher sanctions, the West’s economic broadside has caused long-term damage to “Fortress Russia”.
Alberta’s approach to fiscal management involves a nauseating cycle of big spending followed by massive cuts — almost entirely due to the outsized influence of oil and gas revenues. The rollercoaster at the West Edmonton Mall is seen in this photo. (Jerry Bowley/Flickr)

Alberta budget means Albertans are trapped on a relentless fiscal rollercoaster ride

Every time Alberta’s energy-based economy goes into a tailspin, it’s because the price of oil has declined precipitously, and when it booms, it’s because the price has soared.
The war in Ukraine will have major implications for energy and climate change, in Canada and the rest of the world, far into the future. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

How the war in Ukraine will shape Canada’s energy policy — and climate change

New relationships between energy, geopolitical security and climate change policy flowing from the invasion of Ukraine are beginning to emerge, and the implications could be enormous.
Phasing out fossil fuels means that today’s production is the peak, and that from here on out extraction and infrastructure must decline over time. (Green Energy Futures/flickr)

How Canada can leave 83 per cent of its oil in the ground and build strong new economies

If Canada chooses to keep its oil in the ground, it doesn’t mean turning off the tap overnight. Skilled trades will be key to winding down the industry and building up new lines of work.

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