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Articles on Vaccine hesitancy

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Even if Alberta was motivated to increase vaccination rates through direct government intervention, the measures may not succeed given conservatives’ lack of faith in the province, the premier and the cabinet. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Financial insecurity and right-wing beliefs drive COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among Albertans

We surveyed Albertans, and while most were vaccinated, we found certain groups were less likely to be vaccinated than others. Those being people facing economic hardship and political affiliation.
Bundhurr Marburumburaay Miilgi Ngalgarra (lighting, thunder, rain, shine)- no matter how big, strong or scary the storm the sun will shine again. Artist Renae Lamb, Wiradjuri Wongabong. Owner Midnight Dreaming. Used with permission. Provided by author

10 ways we can better respond to the pandemic in a trauma-informed way

The COVID-19 pandemic is a stressful time for all, and even more so for people experiencing trauma-related stress. How can public health emergency responses avoid further trauma for vulnerable people?
An anti-vaccine protester and a vaccine supporter demonstrate in from of a Montréal hospital in September, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Why ensuring trust is important in reducing COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy

Trust is needed to curb vaccine hesitancy. Governments need to explain vaccines and other public health measures, while also speaking to the broader purpose of caring for the community we belong to.
Sticking to your beliefs in a rapidly changing world isn’t necessarily the best choice. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Changing your mind about something as important as vaccination isn’t a sign of weakness – being open to new information is the smart way to make choices

People tend to stick with their stated beliefs. But here’s how external forces like vaccine mandates can push people to do something they don’t want to do – and provide some face-saving cover.
An anti-vaccination protester holds an upside down Canadian flag during a demonstration outside the venue of a Liberal Party election campaign event, in Newmarket, Ont. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

The anti-vax movement is being radicalized by far-right political extremism

Vaccine hesitancy has been a subject of intense study in the field of scientific communication. Anti-vaxxers’ recent radicalization needs to be looked at.
Sometimes facts and statistics aren’t enough to convince someone to get the COVID-19 vaccine. PeopleImages/E+ via Getty Images

A direct recommendation from a doctor may be the final push someone needs to get vaccinated

There are a variety of reasons why people do or don’t want to be vaccinated. Depending on how they frame their messaging around vaccination, doctors can often be the deciding factor.
In the reluctance to vaccinate, there is a lack of trust and understanding of the scientific process. Better communication would help rebuild bridges. The Canadian Press/Paul Chiasson

A researcher’s view on COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy: The scientific process needs to be better explained

Before the pandemic, the public perceived science as infallible and inaccessible. But the opening up of research to the general public has changed that perception.
Protesters gather at Indiana University in June 2021 to demonstrate against mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations for students, staff and faculty. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Forceful vaccine messages backfire with holdouts – how can it be done better?

Subtly shifting the crafting and delivery of public health messaging on COVID-19 vaccines could go a long way toward persuading many of the unvaccinated to get the shot.
Intensive care physicians are yet again facing ICU bed and staff shortages as severe COVID-19 cases rise. gorodenkoff/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Medicine is an imperfect science – but you can still trust its process

A critical care doctor brings a frontlines perspective to the frustration of dealing firsthand with vaccine hesitancy and discusses the limitations of science and medicine.
By better communicating how vaccines boost the immune system’s long term “memory”, manufacturers could address vaccine hesitancy. i_am_zews/Shutterstock

COVID-19 vaccines produce T-cell immunity that lasts and works against virus variants

Cell-mediated immunity is particularly effective at eradicating viruses, and more durable. This is important in the fight against COVID-19.

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