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Articles on Vaccine hesitancy

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Medical students’ backgrounds often reflect the diversity of local communities, which can allow them more access and trust for vaccination efforts. Bryan Goodchild/UMass Medical School

We’re building a vaccine corps of medical and nursing students – they could transform how we reach underserved areas

One university is showing how the vaccine corps concept can speed up vaccination rates, including launching a large-scale vaccination site staffed by hundreds of students and volunteers.
Maria Saravia, a worker at the University of Southern California’s Keck Hospital, adjusts her mother’s mask before her COVID-19 vaccination. Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Why the next major hurdle to ending the pandemic will be about persuading people to get vaccinated

Getting a vaccine is proving difficult for many older people now, but the mad rush for the vaccine won’t last long. Many people don’t want to get one at all, and that will impede herd immunity.
Vaccine hesitancy is a growing public health problem. Sharon Seretlo/Gallo Images via Getty Images

South Africa’s immunisation record risks being dented by anti-vaccination views

Vaccine hesitancy has resulted in multiple vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks. Research on vaccine hesitancy in South Africa is limited. But growing evidence suggests that it’s becoming a problem.
Establishing public trust is now central to any decisions regarding the inoculation of our child population. (Shutterstock)

Should children get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Historically, we immunized children against diseases like polio that were a clear danger to them, but COVID-19 is usually mild in children. However, herd immunity is unlikely without vaccinating kids.
If too many Americans refuse to take the COVID-19 vaccine, achieving population immunity will be difficult. Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Americans have unrealistic expectations for a COVID-19 vaccine

Two in five Americans say they don’t want a COVID-19 vaccine, which is a problem. Finding out what Americans do want from a vaccine might help.
Francesca Passer, a registered pharmacist technician, carefully fills a syringe with the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 mRNA vaccine at a vaccine clinic during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on Dec. 15, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Can COVID-19 vaccinations be mandated? Short answer: Yes

Employers could require their workers to get vaccinated against COVID-19 via both workplace policies and existing laws. Neither option, however, is simple or straightforward.
The drug maker company Pfizer says its COVID-19 vaccine is 95% effective with no serious side effects. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/VIEW press/Corbis News via Getty Images

Coronavirus vaccines: health experts identify ways to build public trust

The United Nations recently asked a group of experts across the world to recommend ways to persuade people to take a COVID-19 vaccine. Here is a summary of their suggestions.

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